REPORTS FROM EARLY CAT SHOWS IN ROCHESTER (LOCKEHAVEN CAT CLUB)

ROCHESTER

1901 ROCHESTER CAT SHOW

CONCERNING CATS - Democrat and Chronicle, January 3rd, 1901
Many Noted Prize Winners Entered for the Coming Show — How to Ship Pets.

The entries for the forthcoming cat show, which opens next Tuesday at Fitzhugh hall, are about all in, and Rochesterians will have an opportunity of attending the first cat show ever held in this city. Judging from the interest which has been manifested, there is little doubt that the exhibition will be among the social events of the season. The show is to be in charge of the Rochester Wellesley Club and the Beresford Cat Club, and the arrangements made for the affair insure its success. The entry list contains the names of many of the famous felines in the country, and the total number of entries runs well up into the hundreds.

The entries include a number of prize winners at other shows, and representatives of the most noted cat breeding establishments in the country. The entries in the Persian, Angora and Manx classes are especially numerous, and the exhibit of the latter promises to be of exceptional interest. But the fact that these blue-blooded representatives of catdom are entered, should not deter owners of ordinary cats from entering their pets at the show. Several classes for ordinary breeds have been arranged, and the show of local animals is expected to be one of the most interesting of the many features of the exhibition.

Among the premiums to be awarded at the show are special medals offered by the Beresford Cat Club, of Chicago. The medals are made from a special die owned the club, and the owners of the animals which carry off the medals will have reason to congratulate themselves.

The Cat Journal, a monthly devoted to those interested in cats, has the following suggestions to offer to persons intending to forward animals for exhibition: “Too much care cannot be taken in shipping cats. We urge better boxes and crates to be used than most of those from afar sent last year. A common box opened on the top is not a good form of crate. A little door can be made with a hinge and secure fastening on top, but the box should be high enough for the cat to stand, sit or lie down, and have a slat opening at one end of the front side of the box, so that the cat can move to that end and look out and realize what is going on, and see a kind face and get the true meaning of the familiar or unfamiliar sounds. It wants very little: light and air, and a warm, dark corner in which to retire and rest. It is well to place sawdust first in the bottom of the box, and cover this thickly with a bed of clean straw or hay, and a drinking or feeding pan or cup should be hung inside, so that water or food can be given to the cat. The matter of getting the cat to the express is all important.

“Any careful owner will not trust his pets to a long, cold ride in the regular express company's wagon, but take it to the express company's agent at the train just a little while (say an hour or so) before the train starts, thereby avoiding unnecessary exposure. It is really cruel, and past all understanding, how some owners ship their cats.”

THE CAT CELEBRITIES – Democrat and Chronicle, January 4th, 1901
They Are All Expected at the Show Next Week in Fitzhugh Hall. At the meeting of the Wellesley Club, held yesterday afternoon, the final arrangements for the much heralded cat show were made. The show, which opens next Tuesday, will bring together many celebrated prize winners. Among the recent entries are to be mentioned Swampscott, acknowledged to be the longest haired cat In America, and Teddy Roosevelt, famous in name and breeding.

It Is expected that Rochester will make a sort of one half way meeting ground between East and West, so that those unable to go all the way to Boston, or Eastern cats not able to go to Chicago, can meet and compete with Western cats at Rochester. At a very early date entry blanks and premium lists were asked for, and the interest In the fancy meet is growing, for the show was hardly talked of before promises of entries were given.

There will be fifty three classes catering to all breeds and colors, and an endeavor will be made to give fair play to all. There are 223 specials divided among the cats.

Miss Louise Wetmore, of No. 108 South Fitzhugh street, Rochester, is secretary, and E. N, Barker, of No. 39 Washington avenue, Albany, will Judge all classes. No pains will be spared to make all welcome. It is not too late to enter your cat today.

The show will be open daily from 9 A.M. to 9. P.M., and the members of the Wellesley Club will be on hand at all hours to receive their friends. It is expected that the list of long-haired cats will be larger than shown at Philadelphia last month, and will include the cat celebrities of the continent.

PUSSY’S EXPOSITION – Democrat and Chronicle, Jan 6, 1901
It would not be surprising if the approaching cat show in this city were liberally sustained. Despite all the newspaper jokes about cats and all the objurgations and other missiles hurled at them from windows in the dead of night, old maids and dowagers are not the only persons who take an interest in what we may be permitted to call felinity.

The cat show was incidentally mentioned to some street car passengers yesterday, and it was surprising to notice the enthusiasm over cats the suggestion evoked. There was an instant discussion of favorite Toms and Tabbies. Men are a little shy, ordinarily, about betraying interest in this subject, but when they believe their confidence will not be abused they own up to a soft regard for the furry, purring creature which takes so much comfort at their firesides.

The domestic cat in its normal state is a miniature and harmless representative of the huge cats of the jungle when they are not on the trail for food or at bay against their enemies. What a soft, sleek, comfortable creature pussy is! What sound produced by animals is more soothing than its rhythmical purr! What flexibility and pliancy of body and limb! How noiseless is its tread! How daintily will it pick its way over questionable ground! If there are no boys or dogs within sight, a cat will cross a muddy street as circumspectly as a lady in satin slippers.

Of pussy's vocal performances at night it is not necessary to speak. They have long been celebrated in song and story. Every newspaper wit has shied his keenest shafts at the artist and every back fence bears the scars of domiciliary pro-jectiles which have invariably missed their mark. But for a few days — or nights — these oratorios will be suspended. The cats that once on the garden wall the soul of music shed, will rest as mute in Fitzhugh hall, as though that soul had fled [note: a play on “The Harp That Once Through Tara’s Halls]

NUMBER OF ENTRIES FOR THE CAT SHOW - Democrat and Chronicle, January 6, 1901
Many of the kings and queens of catdom came to town yesterday morning. They were genteel in appearance and conducted themselves with great dignity in the presence of those to whom a peep was permitted. Prominent among the arrivals was Robin Hood, a handsome Persian brown tabby. The arrangements for the show are nearly complete, and the cats will all be in place by Tuesday morning. The indications are that the show will be the largest in point of entries of the year. The entries in the several classes that have already reached the city are as follows:

Long-haired Cats.
Class 1. white males — four entries.
Class 2. white females — one entry.
Class 3. black males or females — three entries.
Class 4. blue males — two entries.
Class 5. blue females — no entries.
Class 6. orange or yellow, marked or unmarked, no white — two entries.
Class 7. cream or fawn, no marks, no white — no entries.
Class 8. brown tabby males, no white — one entry.
Class 9. brown tabby females, no white — three entries.
Class 10. gray tabbies, males or females, no white — one entry.
Class 11. silver tabbies, males or females, no white - two entries.
Class 12. chinchilla or shaded silver, as unmarked as possible, no white males — no entries.
Class 13. chinchilla or shaded silver, females — no entries
Class 14. smoke males — no entries.
Class 15. smoke females — one entry.
Class 16. brown or gray tabby with white, males or females —two entries.
Class 17. orange or silver tabby with white, males or females - no entries.
Class 18. tortoiseshell with or without white, males or females — two entries.
Class 19. any other color, no white — one entry.
Class 20. any other color with white — eight entries.
Class 21. best white, black, or blue, solid colors — no entries.
Class 22. best orange or yellow, marked or unmarked, cream or fawn, no white — no entries.
Class 23. best brown gray, or silver tabby — no entries.
Class 24. best silver, silver tabby, or smoke — no entries.

Altered Cats.
Class 26. best white, blue, or black — one entry.
Class 27. best tabby, any color, no white — four entries.
Class 28. best any other color — six entries.

Short-haired or Ordinary Cats.
Class 29. white, males or females — one entry.
Class 30. black, males or females — one entry.
Class 31. blue or maltese, males or females — one entry.
Class 32. brown tabby, males or females, no white — one entry.
Class 33. gray tabby, males or females, no white — one entry.
Class 34. silver tabby, males or females, no white - one entry.
Class 35. orange or yellow tabby, males or females, no white —one entry.
Class 36. tortoiseshell with or without white, males or females — one entry.
Class 37. brown or gray tabby with white, males or females — two entries.
Class 38. silver, orange or yellow tabby with white, males or females — three entries.
Class 39. blue and white or black and white, males or females — three entries.
Class 40. any other color with or without white — four entries.

Manx.
Class 41. Male — two entries.
Class 42. Females — two entries.
Class 43. altered or gelded — one entry.

Class 44. Russian blue, males or females— no entries.
Class 45. Siamese, males or females — no entries.
Class 46. any other foreign variety — one entry.

Kittens.
Class 47. best white, black, or blue — two entries.
Class 48. best tabby, any colors, no white — no entries.
Class 49. tortoiseshell with or without white, or tabby with white — two entries.
Class 50. best any other color — no entries.

Altered Cats.
Class 5l. best white, black, blue, or maltese - three entries.
Class 52, best tabby, any color, no white - three entries.
Class 53. best any other color — eight entries.

THE CATS ARE IN TOWN - Democrat and Chronicle, January 8, 1901
The great event is at hand. The cat show opens to-day. This morning Fitzhugh hall will see such an aggregation of aristocratic felines as was never dreamed of before. Everyone’s darling tabby will he there, in her best ribbon and collar, and it is expected that this enterprise under the auspices of the Wellesley College Club will be not only a great success financially, but socially as well. It isn't often that Rochester has the pleasure of gazing familiarly at the handsomest felines in this country, with pedigrees, and it is expected that the general public will take advantage of this unusual privilege.

But the entries are not all confined to the aristocracy in the feline line, as witness the entry of one Teddy Roosevelt of breed unknown, and owned by a Rochester fancier. This Republican of democratic tendencies expects to land at least a blue ribbon, it is stated. A list of Rochester society women who are to act as patronesses at the big show was published in yesterday’s issue of the Democrat and Chronicle. Nothing has been left undone to make the show a success.

THE CAT SHOW AT FITZHUGH HALL – Democrat and Chronicle, January 8, 1901
This week promises to be a most interesting and novel affair. The announcement that it is not the only cat show in the city this week will not keep away any patrons of pussy. There is another cat show on. This one is at Rundel’s art gallery, 9 West Main street. You can see the various styles of new century cats in Mr. Rundel’s show window all this week. If you desire to take one of them home with you, do so. Prices will not prevent. Don’t fail to see this exhibition.

PUSSY INSTALLED AT FITZHUGH HALL - Democrat and Chronicle, January 9, 1901
The cat show which opened yesterday at Fitzhugh Hall, under the auspices of the Wellesley College Club, is the event of the season. All day long there was a string of visitors at the hall, who came to admire, to pet or to purchase the beautiful specimens of feline loveliness which are on exhibition. It is said to be, by a fancier, the best and the largest cat show held in this country since that held in New York in 1896.

The arrangements are specially good. Fitzhugh Hall proves an ideal place for an exhibit of the kind, and every precaution seems to have been taken for the care and protection of milady's pets.

Prizes were awarded yesterday by E. N. Barker, of Albany, a former breeder of cats and dogs, and owner of the once famous King Humbert. It is claimed that the only cat there with a perfect tail is Locksley, owned by Mrs. Mix, of Chicago. He is a beauty in yellow and white, with a large bushy tail, more like that of a red fox, and which any cat might well envy. Most of the pets yesterday afternoon, when visited by a reporter of this paper, were suffering from ennui, evidently, for they scorned the many flattering remarks and the wholesale admiration of which they were the object. Most of them were snugly curled up in a corner, and intent upon their afternoon siesta, show or no show, and they didn't intend to be disturbed. When they were aroused by friendly prods or by having their dainty ears tickled, they would get up and stretch open their big eyes in mild surprise at such an indignity, and immediately curl up again, and prepare for another nap.

They are arranged in comfortable wire cages, in which food and water are placed; everything is scrupulously clean, and the furry beauties are more or less adorned with bows of satin ribbon of various color; some have collars with tinkling bells, and a few are without ornamentation of any kind. Some are provided evidently by fond and loving mistresses, with dainty silken cushions upon which they lie contentedly, but the others owned by breeders are not so luxuriously housed.

There are some outrageous flirts, as was to be expected among so many beauties, and Miss Tabby does not hesitate to sing sweetly to Mr. Tortoise across the way, and many fetching glances are exchanged between the pair. They are both aristocrats, and a coal black gentleman close by divided his attentions between a beautiful white Angora, and one of less pretentious pedigree, in black and white, creating jealous disdain in the breast of the white Angora.

Among the visitors were many small children, who delighted in fondling the pussies whenever an opportunity was offered them. It is evident that the exhibit is to be the most popular attraction offered in this city for many moons.

Mr. Baker stated that the show of short-hairs is exceptionally good, and the last two classes, which are mostly from Rochester, are the best in the show. Some of the most celebrated cats in the country are here, including Champion Mete, the big winner from New York; Torti, from Chicago; Swampscott, the big white cat, and Treasure. Miss Moreau, of New York, sent nine manx, or tailless cats, and Mrs. Thurston, from Newport, sent five longhaired cats, most of which took prizes, and some the most valuable special prizes. Mr. Jones, of Palmyra, has the largest collection both in long and short- haired cats at the show, and he takes the prize for the best cat at the show, a brown Persian tabby from imported stock, named Robin Hood. The prizes awarded yesterday by Mr. Baker were as follows:

LONG HAIRED CLASS, WHITE MALE: First prize awarded Swampscott, owned by Mrs. Fred Everett Smith, of Chicago. Second prize, awarded Puff, owned by Miss Taylor, Rochester. Third prize, awarded His Majesty, owned by Mrs. M. B. Thurston, Newport, R.I.

WHITE FEMALES: First prize, awarded Jewel, owned by Mrs. Thurston.
BLACKS: First prize, Magic, owned by Mrs. Thurston. Second prize, awarded Nig, owned by Mr. Coolidge, Phelps, N.Y.
BLUES: Second prize, awarded Jimmykins, owned by Mr. Jones.
ORANGE OR YELLOW: First prize, awarded Angora owned by Mrs. Joseph Pressey, Rochester.
BROWN TABBY: First prize, awarded Robin Hood, owned by Mr. Jones. Second prize, awarded no name, owned by Mr. Jones.
BROWN TABBY FEMALES: First prize, awarded Goozie, owned by Mr. Jones. Second prize, awarded Happy Day, owned by Mr. Jones,
Third prize, awarded Treasure, owned by Mrs. F. E. Smith, Chicago.
GRAY TABBY: First prize, awarded no name, owned by Mr. Jones.
SILVER TABBY: First prize, awarded Witchwood, owned by Mrs.
Kate Lorraine Gage, Brewster, N.Y.
SMOKE MALE: First prize, awarded no name, owned by Mr. Jones.
SMOKE FEMALE: First prize, awarded Cossitt, owned by Mrs. M.B. Thurston, Newport.
BROWN AND WHITE TABBY: First prize, awarded Kilpie, owned by Mr. Jones. Second prize, awarded Kippie, owned by Mr. Jones. First prize, awarded no name, owned by Mr. Jones.
TORTOISE-SHELL: First prize, awarded Miss India, owned by Mrs. Thurston. Second prize, awarded Juliet, owned by Mrs Sage. Third prize, awarded Meme, owned by W.H. Nellis, Rochester.
BEST WHITE, BLACK OR BLUE KITTEN: First prize, awarded Flashlight, owned by Miss Hurlburt, Tompkinsville, S.I.
BEST BROWN OR GRAY KITTEN: First prize, awarded no name, owned by Mr. Jones.

ALTERED CATS – BEST WHITE, BLUE OR BLACK: First prize, awarded Fuzzy Wuzzy, owned by Mrs. Richard Harlan, Rochester. Second, awarded Toodles, owned by Mrs. Meade, Rochester.
BEST TABBY, ANY COLOR: First, second and third prizes awarded Mr. Jones’s cats.
BEST ANY OTHER COLOR: First prize, awarded Locksley, owned by Mrs. H.A. Mix. Akin, N.Y. Second and third prizes awarded Mr. Jones’s cats. Highly commended, Mrs. Meade’s William McKinley.

SHORT-HAIRED OR ORDINARY WHITE: First prize, awarded Mrs. Schlitzer’s cat, Rochester. Second prize, awarded Chester Coquette, owned by Mrs. L.C. Morran, Southampton, L.I.
BLACK: First prize, awarded no name, owned by Mr. Jones. Second prize, awarded Topsy, owned by Mr. Mallory, No. 142 State street, Rochester, N. Y.
BLUE OR MALTESE: First prize, awarded Petie, owned by Mrs. Thomas Jackson, Rochester.
BROWN TABBY: First prize, awarded Major, owned by A. H. Black, Rochester.
GRAY TABBY: First prize, awarded Baby, owned by Mrs. Jackson. Rochester.
SILVER TABBY: First prize, awarded Sylvia, owned by H. S. Draper, New York city.
ORANGE OR YELLOW TABBY: First prize, awarded Mete Champion, owned by Mr. Draper. Second prize, awarded Orange, owned by Mr. Jones.
TORTOISE-SHELL: First prize, awarded Torti, owned by Mr. Draper.
BROWN OR GRAY TABBY: First prize, awarded no name, owned by Mr. Jones.
SILVER OR ORANGE: First prize, awarded Bunny, owned by Mrs. N. M. White. Rochester. Second prize, awarded Chester Curprise, owned by Mrs. Morran.
BLUE AND WHITE OR BLACK AND WHITE: Second prize, awarded Beauty, owned by Richard P. Randolph.
ANY OTHER COLOR: First prize, awarded Trust, owned by Mr. Draper.

MANX: First prize, awarded Duke of Chester, owned by Mrs. Morran. Second prize, awarded Chester Caprice, owned by Mrs. Morran.
MANX FEMALES: First prize, awarded Chester Carmen, owned by Mrs. Morran. Second prize, awarded Chester Chiffon, owned by Mrs. Morran.
ALTERED MANX: First prize, awarded Chester Coquette, owned by Mrs. Morran.

SHORT-HAIRED KITTEN: First prize, awarded Chester Bride, owned by Mrs. Morran. Second and third prizes, awarded Mr. Mallory’s cats.
TORTOISE-SHELL: First prize, awarded Chester Prince, owned by Mrs. Morran. Second prize, awarded Lassie of the Second, owned by Mr. Draper.

ALTERED CATS — BEST SOLID COLOR: First prize, awarded Dewey, owned by Mrs. Ashton, Rochester. Second prize, awarded Turquoise, owned by Miss Hurlburt. Third prize, equal between Max, owned by Mrs. G. B. Hall, Rochester, and Mrs. J. E. Lavery. Rochester.

TABBY ANY COLOR, NO WHITE: First prize, awarded no name, owned by Mr. Stebbins, Rochester, Second prize, awarded Jim Corbett, owned by Miss Townsend, Rochester, Third prize, awarded Tiger, owned by Mrs.P.H. Kline, Rochester. Highly commended, Zenda Vesta, owned by Mrs. Brandon, Rochester; Ginger, owned by Mr. Jones; and Thomas, owned by Miss Hurlburt.
BEST ANY OTHER COLOR: First prize, awarded Petsey, owned by Miss Taylor, Rochester. Second prize, awarded Beauty, owned by Mrs. Kinney, Livonia, N.Y. Third prize, awarded Tiger, owned by Miss Miriam Lawrence, Rochester. Highly commended, Mr. Cole’s John; Mrs. Ryan’s Tiger; Mrs. Bragdon's Zarra Adter.

BERESFORD CAT CLUB PRIZES:
Long haired, best blue, prize awarded Mr. Jones’s cat.
Best white, prize awarded Swampscott, owned by Mrs. Smith.
Best silver, prize awarded Witchwood, owned by Mrs. Gate.
Best smoke, prize awarded Cosset, owned by Mrs. Thurston.

BEST TABBY: Prize awarded Robin Hood, owned by Mr. Jones.
BEST ANY OTHER COLOR: Prize awarded Miss India, owned by Mrs. Thurston.
BEST SHORTHAIRED MALE: Prize awarded Orange, owned by Mrs. Jones.
BEST SHORT HAIRED FEMALE: Prize awarded Mr. Jones’s cat.

The show will continue to-day and tomorrow, and will be open evenings, so that all will have an opportunity to see the famous pussies now domiciled at Fitzhugh hall.

PRETTY, POPULAR PUSSY - Democrat and Chronicle, January 10, 1901
Fitzhugh Hall Again Drew Immense Crowds at Wellesley Club Cat Show.
The cat show has proven so far one of the most successful undertakings that has been attempted in this city in some time. Yesterday there was a phenomenal attendance, and at the busy seasons of the afternoon and evening it was almost impossible to get near enough to see pussy favorably. There was a large attendance of society people, as well as little folks and real cat lovers. Financially the show is a big winner, and the young ladies of the Wellesley Club who had the pluck to go ahead with the enterprise have every reason to congratulate themselves.

Everyone was asking to see Robin Hood, a lovely brown, long-haired tabby, the greatest prize winner, considered the best cat of all at the show, and owned by Mr. Jones, of Palmyra. The long-haired pussies attracted a great deal of attention, especially the great white Angoras. Several sales were reported, and many prospective purchasers were trying to decide just which special puss best suited their purse and their taste. Certain it is that the points of the various favorites are being carefully canvassed, and Mr. Barker, the judge, has been kept pretty busy explaining the marks of superiority that led to the award in the several classes.

An incident of the show which is worthy of special mention happened yesterday afternoon, when Miss Blanche Nolds, a dainty but timid little miss of 9 years, appeared at the show bringing her pussy. Miss Nolds had heard of the show, and wanted her kitty to be entered. Here is her application which she handed in, together with the pussy cat:

This kitten's name is Lady Washington. This kitten has a record of catching 20 mice in 20 minutes her Mistress Is Blanch Nolds city.

Lady Washington has not taken a prize, being a very nondescript sort of an animal, but she has attracted no little attention, and Miss Nolds is very proud of her just the same.

To-day is the closing day of the show, and the morning and afternoon will be given up to the entertainment of the little folks especially. Many a little tot is looking forward to a view of these famous prize cats. To-night there will be a special musical programme and the award and presentation of the prizes. The members of the Wellesley Club will give a reception to their friends. No one ought to miss the cat show for it is well worth going to see, and judging from the attendance of last night few will miss it.

Following is a list of prize winners which was not published in yesterday’s issue of the Democrat and Chronicle, all of which are special:

BEST PAIR OF BLACK KITTENS: Prize awarded kittens owned by B. L. Palmer. Rochester.
BEST SHORT-HAIRED MALE: First prize awarded Meme, owned by H. S. Draper, New York city.
BEST SHORT-HAIRED FEMALE: Prize awarded Chester Carmen, owned by Miss Moreau, Southampton, L.I.
BEST ROCHESTER CAT: Prize awarded Dewey, owned by Mrs. Ashton.
BEST FAMILY OF KITTENS: Prize awarded Mr. Mallory's cat, Rochester.
BEST CAT OWNED BY BOY OR GIRL NOT OVER 14 YEARS: Prize awarded Beauty, owned by Richard Ludolph.
BEST CAT FROM CANADA: Prize awarded Pete, owned by Mrs. Thomas Jackson, Rochester.
BEST LONG-HAIRED CAT IN SHOW FROM ROCHESTER: First prize awarded Puff, owned by Miss Taylor. Second prize awarded Fuzzy Wuzzy, owned by Mrs. Richard Harlan. Third prize awarded Aurora, owned by Mrs. Joseph Pressey.
A silver cup was given as a prize for the best cat in the show, of which Robin Hood was winner. A prize given by Mr. Jones was won by one of his own cats, also Robin Hood.

BEST LONG-HAIRED FEMALE: Prize awarded Miss India, owned by Mrs. Thurston, from Newport.
BEST SMOKE FEMALE: Prize won by Cossitt, owned by Mrs. Thurston.
BEST NOVICE UNDER ONE YEAR OLD, NEVER BEFORE EXHIBITED: Prize won by Flashlight, owned by Miss Hurlburt, Tompkinsville, S.I.
BEST DISPLAY OF MANX CATS: Prize awarded Miss Moreau.

Dossenbach’s orchestra is a great attraction at the show in the evening, and the pussies seem to prick up their ears and display animation at the sound of the popular selections of this popular orchestra. To-day will be the last opportunity for those who have not already visited Fitzhugh hall.

CLOSE OF THE CAT SHOW – Democrat and Chronicle, January 11, 1901
To-day it is a thing of the past — that cat show, concerning which so much has been said and read and written and printed. The event was planned and carried to a successful culmination by the Rochester Wellesley Club, the members of which will meet some day next week to discuss the affair in its various after-lights, financial, social, and philanthropical — for it must be remembered that the governing thought in arranging the exhibition was the attainment of sufficient funds to found a scholarship at Wellesley for some deserving young woman of Rochester. The club’s officers were not ready to say last night just how much progress towards the $5,000 wanted had been made through the proceeds of the show. This end of the enterprise will be considered at next week’s meeting of the club.

It is not yet known whether the club will establish itself as the official backer of Rochester cat shows. That is another matter to be considered at the meeting. The event that ended last night was considered a success, both in point of attendance by patrons and in point of number and excellence of entries.

It was largely an affair of social note; the patronesses are all members of the best circles. This aspect of the function, it is figured by persons interested, will increase with each succeeding cat show. It has been suggested also that this tendency would be largely developed if the cat-fanciers and the florists could see their way clear to uniting on an annual show, so that the attractions could be combined at a single exhibition. The prophecy was made last night that if the combination should be formed Fashion would adopt the an-nual exhibition and in time give it a fame like unto that of the New York horse show.

Several sales were made yesterday, mostly of Angora kittens and short-hair cats. The prize-winners received their awards last night, and later in the evening the Rochester exhibits were carried away in baskets by owners or by (more or less) willing escorts. The exhibits from out of town remained another night at Fitzhugh hall, in care of Harry Jones, of Palmyra, who will ship the cats to their various destinations to-day, and then go home to clear his ears of mingled mews and music, the former of the felines and the latter of Donnelly's orchestra, which furnished some excellent entertainment lust night.

GATHERING OF THE CATS - Democrat and Chronicle, January 11, 1901
The much talked of cat show which is to open at Fitzhugh hall to-morrow morning promises to be one of the social successes of the season, as well as affording the general public an opportunity to inspect the finest cat flesh the world has produced. The Wellesley Club of this city is holding the show for a charitable purpose, and the patronesses are Mrs. Fred Allen, Mrs. Henry F. Burton. Mrs. Harry Langdon Brewster, Mrs. J. Warren Cutler, Mrs. Newton M. Collins, Mrs. Henry G. Danforth, Dr. Kazabeth Denio, Mrs. A. O. Fenn, Mrs. Albert H. Harris, Mrs. Sumner Hayward, Mrs. John Howe, Mrs. Max Landsberg, Miss Alida Lattimore, Mrs. George Loomis, Mrs. Alexander M. Lindsay, Mrs. W. A. Montgomery; Mrs. Henry Perkins. Mrs. J. Harry Stedman, Mrs. W. R. Taylor, Mrs. James Watson, Mrs. Warham Whitney, Miss Clara Wilder, Mrs. Frederick Will and Miss Marion Wright.

The event will be the occasion of many “cat parties,” and the hall will be the popular meeting place for society people during the days of the show. Apart from this, interest centers in the really excellent cats which will grace the show. The Beadle, from Mrs. Locke’s Chicago collection, was a notable arrival of yesterday. The Beadle has taken prizes almost without number on both sides of the Atlantic, and is a magnificent Angora, weighing thirty pounds or more. Swampscott Victor, Gauzie, Crystal and a whole string of the celebrities are here anxiously awaiting the competition.

The Beresford Cat Club, of Chicago, which has offered a number of valuable medals, will be well represented. Already the hotels are beginning to fill up with cat fanciers from all parts of the country. The show has brought together about every kind of a cat from the common feline of the back alley to the aristocratic resident of milady’s boudoir, and will be well worth going to see.

STOLE ANGORA CAT FROM SHOW - Detroit Free Press, January 11, 1901. George H. Herring, the chiropodist at 204 Woodward avenue, was placed under arrest, by Special Officers Rutledge and Saal yesterday afternoon upon a charge of larceny. It is alleged that he stole a handsome Angora cat from a cage at the cat show Wednesday night and that the cat was found in his rooms. The officers state that he admitted having stolen the feline but did not consider it criminal.

CATS DREW WELL – Democrat and Chronicle, January 12th, 1901
The cats have all gone to their homes, and the Rochester Wellesley Club, under whose auspices the cat show was given, is figuring up where it stands financially. The work is very pleasant, because already matters have been shaped enough to know that the figure is on the right side of the column and a good sized one. Miss L.S. Wetmore, secretary of the club, said last night that she presumed the proceeds would show $600 clear gain. There were 1,100 paid admissions the first day, 2,200 the second, and between 900 and 1,000 the third day and night.

The society is greatly pleased with the result financially and otherwise, and so much so that another show next year is contemplated. The money realized is to be used toward establishing a scholarship at Wellesley College for a Rochester girl: no girl in particular but any one who may prove herself worthy. It will require $500 each year for this expense. The money thus realized will not be paid over, nor the young woman started at the college until next September.

The cat show was the first to be held in this part of the state. New York has held them, but It remained for Rochester to be the second city in the state to have the honor of being host to pussy. The cats were all in splendid condition when they left for their homes, and meowed requests that they might return next year and again display their points of excellence. Some 150 of the cats died at the last show held in London, England, but then a “London fog will kill a dog,” and sometimes a cat. Yesterday Miss Wetmore was sending away the prizes that had been won. Several purchases were made during the exhibit here, and a few of the pussies remained behind as personal property of Rochesterians. There are more cats of pedigree in Rochester to day than before the period of the cat days.

PREPARATIONS BEGIN FOR ANNUAL CAT SHOW – November 8th, 1901
Pussy is going to pay Rochester another visit. She made her debut in this city about a year ago under the auspices of the Wellesley Club, and so warm was her reception and so favorable an impression did she leave, that it has been decided to repeat the visit. The dates announced for the show are November 20th, 21st and 22nd, at Fitzhugh hall, and all entries must be in by Friday, November 15th.

In connection with the cat show there will be a cavy exhibit, and John Robinson, of New York, has been engaged to judge the animals. It is intended to furnish entertainment aside from the exhibit of aristocratic and plebeian felines, so there will be a “European cat circus,” in which numerous highly intelligent pussies will do numerous startling acts.

It was stated by E. N. Barker, one of the principal judges last year, that the show produced the finest collection of short-haired cats he had ever seen. It is hoped that everyone in Rochester who possesses a cat will enter it in the show. What are known as “common cats” are quite as acceptable as those of long pedigree and aristocratic lineage. Entry blanks may be secured by applying to Miss Louise Wetmore, No. 84 South Fitzhugh street, or Mrs. Joseph Dodge, No. 129 Thayer street. The cost of each entry will be $1. The entrance fee for cavies will be 50 cents. Following is a list of prizes and medals which will be awarded:

SPECIAL PRIZES.
The Beresford Cat Club will donate four club medals, two to cats owned by members of the club, and two to cats owned by non members. Altered cats not eligible for these medals.
To the best male cat in the show, owned by a member of the B. C. C. of A., a Beresford club medal.
To the best female cat in the show, owned by a member of the B. C. C.. of A., a Beresford club medal.
To the best male cat in the show, owner not a member of the B. C. C.. of A., a Beresford club medal.
To the best female cat in the show, owner not a member of the B. C. C., of A., a Beresford club medal.
To the best long-haired queen, owned by a New York number of the B. C. C., of A., a silver cup, Mrs. Clinton Locke.
To the best short haired female, one year’s subscription to Poultry Monthly
To the best smooth-haired cat, solid color, one year's subscription to Poultry Monthly.
To the best short-haired kitten, one year subscription to Poultry Monthly.
To the best long-haired kitten, one year subscription to Poultry Monthly.
To the best long-haired cat in the show, silver cup, Sibley, Lindsay & Curr Company.
To the best short-haired cat in the show, silver cup, Sibley, Lindsay & Curr Company.
To the best long-haired solid white cat, Madras jardiniere, L. S. Foulkes.
To the best neuter cat, long-haired, one year subscription to Field and Fancy.
To the best neuter eat, short-haired, one year subscription to Field and Fancy.
To the best black female, photographs of himself and family, Menelik III.
To the best mother with family, of kittens, short-haired, $5 in gold, Horace McGuire.
To the best brown tabby, male, photographs of himself and family, Menelik III.
To the best Rochester cat, $5 in gold, George Peer.
To the best out-of-town cat, not owned by fancier or breeder, silver dish, Miss Ellzabctz Gibbard.
To the best team of long-haired kittens, book. “Concerning cats." Lansing Wetmore.
To the cat most unusual in coloring, silver cup, Hiram H. Wood.
To the best exhibition of long-haired cats outside New York state, $5 In gold, E. L. Howe.
To the best short haired black kitten, silver cup, Henry J. Moore.
To the best cat owned by boy or girl not over 14 years old, $3, Miss Marion Wright.
To the homeliest [least attractive] cat in the show (cats entered in this class must be sound and well), gold locket. Humburch Brothers.
To the best short-haired cat, owned by a member of the Rochester Wellesley Club, silver cup. Horace McGuire Jr.
To the best collection of Manx cats, silver medal, Rochester Wellesley Club.
To the best long-haired novice, silver modal, Rochester Wellesley Club.
To the best Persian cat, silver medal, Rochester Wellesley Club.
To the best tortoiseshell cat, silver medal, Rochester Wellesley Club.
Other special prizes will be announced later.

The judges will be E. N. Barker, who was here in charge of the show last year, and John Robins, of New York. The patronesses are: Mrs. Frederick T. Allen, Mrs. George Loomis, Mrs. Henry F. Burton, Mrs. Alexander M. Lindsay, Mrs. J. Warren Cutler, Mrs. William A. Montgomery, Mrs. Newton M. Collins, Mrs. Henry Perkins, Mrs. Henry G. Danforth, Mrs. J. Harry Stedman, Dr. Elizabeth Denio, Mrs. H. W. Sibley, Mrs. Albert O. Fenn, Mrs. William R. Taylor, Mrs. Albert H. Harris, Mrs. James Watson, Mrs. Sumner Hayward, Mrs. Warham Whitney, Mrs. John Howe. Miss Clara Wilder, Mrs. Max Landsberg, Mrs. Frederick Will, Miss Alida Lattimore, Miss Marion Wright.

The money realized from the «show will be added to the fund established by the club last year for the purpose of creating a scholarship in Wellesley College to aid worthy Rochester young women ambitious for a college education.

THE CAT SHOW IS FOR A GOOD CAUSE – Democrat and Chronicle November 10th, 1901
College alumni the world over are anxious always to work for alma mater and the different clubs vie with each other in the variety and elaborateness of the entertainments constantly offered by them. The most unique undertaking of its kind was announced last year when the Rochester Wellesley Club advertised a cat show. The result of this exhibit, when announced, inspired the club to start s fund which, when complete, would give them the privilege of a scholarship at Wellesley which is to be devoted to some Rochester girl.

Preparations now under way for this second annual cat show, which is to be held in Fitzhugh hall from noon Wednesday, November 20th, to noon Saturday November 23d. It is surprising how rapidly the interest in raising and owning fine cats has increased in this country the last few years. England has long been the home of pedigreed cats and from there the fancy came to this country. Though the raising of high class cats started in New England, Chicago is now the cat center in this country. There the Beresford Cat Club of America, has its headquarters, and the Wellesley Club has secured patronage of this organization for their exhibit and have received from them four handsome silver medals and a silver cup to be given as special prizes. The entire premium list for the coming show is very attractive. Every class has been provided for by the regular cash prizes of S4 and $2, and firsts and seconds. The special list is even longer than last year and shows how much interested the local business firms and friends are in having the cat show success and the Rochester scholarship founded at Wellesley. It seems as though any feline pet could cover itself with glory and prizes at Fitzhugh hall next week. That many will certainly do so is evinced by the rapidity with which the entry blanks are being sent in. Everyone wants Mr. Barker, of Albany, the best judge of cats in America, to see their finest cat or cats. And this applies not alone to the longhaired Angora, but to the short-haired or “ordinary” cat, which proves many times not to be ordinary at all. Mr. Barker is specially appreciative of short-haired cats and has offered his five specials to these alone.

But cars are not everything at this show. The National Cavy Club, lately established, has added a new interest to pet stock exhibits [. . .]. And not by any means the least attraction which will claim your attention at this show is Monsieur Dubec and his troop of trained animals. There is to be a performance every afternoon and evening and Saturday morning. Cats are extremely difficult to train, as their independent, yet sensitive spirit resists persuasion and resents force. Monsieur Dubec has achieved wonderful success in this direction and Spectators will see pussy, among other wonderful feats, calmly walking a tight rope or gingerly picking her way over live mice at every step.

The management is extremely anxious that this year’s exhibit shall even surpass that of last year and asks for the healthy co-operation of every cat owner, whether fancier or breeder or simply master or mistress of a pet cat. A large entry from New York state is especially desired. Everything possible for the health and comfort of the animals will be done and great care taken in unpacking and re-packing any pets sent. Premium list and entry blank will be sent on application, or may be obtained from Miss Louise Wetmore. No. 84 South Fitzhugh street or from Mrs. J. HI. Dodge, N. 29 Bayer street. All entries must be in by Friday, I November 15th.

ENTRIES FOR CAT SHOW – Democrat and Chronicle, November 13, 1901
The List of entries for the cat show which opens at Fitzhugh hall next Wednesday is daily increased by the addition of names of feline celebrities, and those who take pleasure in a congregation of cats of high degree are promised a treat in that event. The entries will be grouped in two general classes for short-haired and long-haired cats. The short-haired animals include the common kinds and the longhaired breeds are fancy stock.

The Siamese, the Russian blue and the Abyssinian, the latter supposed to be descendants of the cats worshiped by the Egyptians, are short-haired, but are considered fancy stock. The Indian, Persian, Egyptian, Chinese and Angora are longhaired. Persian cats command high prices. The Angora in its native places has curly hair, but the curl soon disappears from the hair of those bred in this country. A cat from Thibet has long hair and blue eyes; this breed is rare. Cat-breeders give much attention to short ears, a round head, short body and a firm coat.

Cats much pass a physical examination before being admitted to quarters in the hall. Dr. George Legg has been appointed to oversee this work. It is expected that all the cats will be in the city on Wednesday morning. E. N. Barker, of Albany, is to be Judge of the exhibit.

ENTRIES FOR CAT SHOW. - Democrat and Chronicle, November 14th, 1901
No entries to the cat show to be held at Fitzhugh hall on Wednesday, Thursday, Friday and Saturday of next week will be received after to-morrow night. It is desired that especial attention be called to this fact, and everyone who wants to enter cats is urged to have them listed by to-night.
The list of classes has been made up. There are fifty-five in all, and in each one there are two prizes. In every class the first prize is $4 and the second prize $2. Following is a complete list of the different classes:

LONG-HAIRED CATS.
Class 1 — White male.
Class 2 - White female.
Class 3 — Black male or female
Class 4 — Blue male.
Class 5 — Blue female.
Class 6 — Orange or yellow, marked or unmarked, no white.
Class 7 — Cream or fawn, no white.
Class 8 — Brown tabby male, no white.
Class 9 — Brown tabby female, no white.
Class 10 — Silver tabby, male or female, no white.
Class 11 — Chinchilla or shaded silver, as unmarked as possible, no white, male.
Class 12 — Same as class 11, female.
Class 13 — Smoke male.
Class 14 — Smoke female.
Class 15 — Brown or gray tabby, with white, male or female.
Class 16 — Orange or silver tabby, with white, male or female.
Class 17 — Tortoise shell, with or without white, male or female.
Class 18 — Any other color, no white.
Class 19 — Any other color, with white.

LONG-HAIRED KITTENS.
Class 20 — Best white, black or blue, solid colors.
Class 21 — Best orange or yellow, marked or unmarked, and best cream or fawn, no white.
Class 22 — Best brown, gray or silver tabby.
Class 23 — Best silver or smoke.
Class 24 — Best any other color.

LONG-HAIRED ALTERED CATS

Class 25 — Best white, blue or black.
Class 26 — Best tabby, any color, no white.
Class 27 — Best any color tabby with white.
Class 28 — Best any other color.

SHORT-HAIRED CATS.
Class 29 — White, male or female.
Class 30 — Black, male or female.
Class 31 — Blue or maltese, male or female.
Class 32 — Brown tabby, male or female, no white.
Class 33 — Gray tabby, male or female, no white.
Class 34 — Silver tabby, male or female, no white.
Class 35 — Orange or yellow tabby, male or female, no white.
Class 36 — Tortoise shell, with or without white, male or female.
Class 37 — Brown or gray tabby, with, white, male or female.
Class 38 — Silver, orange or yellow tabby, with white, male or female.
Class 39 — Blue and white or black and white, male or female.
Class 40 — Any other color, with or without white.

MANX.
Class 41 — Male.
Class 42 — Female.
Class 43 - Altered or gelded.
Class 44 — Kitten.
Class 45 — Siamese, male or female.
Class 46 — Siamese kitten.
Class 47 — Any other foreign variety.

SHORT HAIRED KITTENS.
Class 48 — Best white, black or blue.
Class 49 — Best tabby, any color, no white.
Class 50 — Tortoise shell, with or without white, or tabby with white.
Class 51 — Best any other color.

SHORT HAIRED ALTERED CATS.
Class 52 — Best white, black, blue or maltese.
Class 53 — Best tabby, brown or gray, no white.
Class 54 — Best silver tabby or orange, no white.
Class 55 — Best any other color.

To those unfamiliar with the terms employed by cat fanciers, some elucidation of them may not be unacceptable. White must be entirely white, with no marks, and eyes generally bine or yellow. Black must be quite black, and orange eyes are especially prized in this class. Blue or maltese are without white and are especially beautiful when they have orange or yellow eyes. A tabby is any cat which is barred, striped or mottled. Brown, blue, gray, silver or yellow animals, marked with black or darker color, go in tabby classes. Manx cats have no tails, and appear in all colors. Long-haired cats are Persian, Angora, Indian, etc. The silver, smokes and creams are peculiar to longhaired cats, the characteristic appearance being due to the shading of the hairs from the dark at the ends to the light at the bodies. Chinchilla is a name frequently applied to shaded silver.

MANY ENTRIES RECEIVED – Democrat and Chronicle, November 15th, 1901
Entries are being dally received by the secretaries of the cat show to be held under the auspices of the Wellesley Club at Fitzhugh hall, beginning at noon next Wednesday and closing at noon of November 23d. Among the famous prize cats entered are
Sweetheart and Ladylove, from Southern New York and Menelik III., from Washington, D.C. Chiefton, a foreign importation, will also be here. Rochester honors will be contested for by a larger number even than at the show last year. Among these are Jupiter and Juno, the prize Angoras of East avenue, who came here this summer from the coast of Maine. Two famous beauties that will be here are General Otis and Queen Victoria. Entry blanks and prize lists may be had of Mrs. Joseph Dodge, No. 29 Thayer street, or of Miss Louise Wetmore, No. 84 South Fitzhugh street. Entries close Saturday night.

ABOUT THE CAT SHOW - Democrat and Chronicle, November 17, 1901
The people of Rochester, old and young, have become so interested in cats and so well versed in cat-kind that it is necessary but to mention the dates of the coming cat show, from noon, Wednesday, November 20th, to noon, Saturday, November 23rd, to have those days set apart for visits to Fitzhugh hall. There, in dainty cages, will be found cats of high and low degree, each, according to the fond owner's opinion, worthy of at least one, if not all four prizes awarded to each class; not to mention several specials.

Admiral Dewey, a handsome and noble black cat, has presented himself with all due modesty for exhibition. Oom Paul, a Rochester cat noted for his lighting propensities, offers himself as a match for any other cat in the show. It is hoped that he will not be overcome in any encounter between now and Wednesday as to unfit him for the final “prize fight.” “Topsy II” and "Everham,” both of whom took prizes as kittens last year, will seek on Wednesday their reward» for entering the world of full-grown cats.

Every baby is worth thousands of dollars to someone, but few people have the opportunity of seeing one, sent all alone from Massachusetts, for exhibition; “Baby,” a beautiful tortoise shell cat, valued at $1,000, will be seen at Fitzhugh hall next week. All these and many more invite you to come.
Besides the cats there will be cavies, or guinea pigs, of all sorts and colors. A fine exhibition of gold fish, Japanese and American, and singing canaries will add to the entertainment. Monsieur Dubeck’s trained cats will give a performance each afternoon and evening, and Saturday morning, during the show.

[. . .]A Utica cat, emulating the example of a Lockport feline, short-circuited a powerful electric current the other day, but, unlike her Lockport sister, came out of the experience alive and well. This tough Utica pussy should have a place in Rochester’s cat show.

ALL SORTS AND CONDITIONS OF CATS TO BE EXHIBITED – Democrat and Chronicle, November 18, 1901
The cat show will soon be here. Rochester cannot boast of an annual horse show, but it can boast of its cat show. Cats of all descriptions, from far and near and of many climes, are to take up their abode the latter half of this week at Fitzhugh hall. The gifted press agent furnishes this interesting and entertaining advance notice of the cat congress:

“In addition to the exhibition pussies, which have nothing to do but look charming, there is to be a troupe of trained cats, brought all the way from Europe to furnish entertainment particularly for American small boys and girls, though, incidentally no doubt, they will amuse the big ones as well. These wonderful pussies walk tight ropes, enact thrilling dramas and do other unusual things. Whatever they do, it is bound to be novel, for though we have heard of all sort of creatures being trained to perform in public, even to the unslothful ant, few of us have had the pleasure of seeing performing cats.

That the children will be delighted goes without saying. All children love kitties and will want to see them, as who will not? Everyone loves to see a well-kept cat about the house. There is an air of contentment about the purring creature lying in a sunny corner that nothing else can give. The old-fashioned New England kitchen was not complete without its sleek, well-fed tabby.

“Such cats are an ornament to society, but let no one think there is any relationship between these dignified and discreet animals and that set of outcasts known as the back fence variety, whose screeching invectives at dead of night awaken honest folk from sleep and call forth the most unchristian thoughts and language. These are the Anarchists of cat society, who go howling about at midnight, inciting and denouncing in their fierce caterwauling, reminding one of Rudyard Kipling’s ‘wall- eyed, yellow frame house of a horse,’ that came up to the back pasture, trying to incite a revolt against man, the oppressor, among the more respectable, law-abiding horses.

“The cat that appeals to the more practical-minded of us, it must be confessed, is the useful mouse catcher. The cat that goes cheerfully about the business of ridding the house of mice is a public benefactor. Nothing is too good for that cat, not even mice. But in the cat world, as elsewhere, utility is not all, and beauty claims her accustomed tribute. We lay our hand in blessing on the head of the mouse catcher, but we adore her charming sister, whose face is her fortune.

“Both kinds will be seen at the cat show, and the fancy kinds especially, in most pleasing variety. The tortoise shell cat, or Spanish, with its pleasing mixture of black, white and yellow; the Chartreuse, of a bluish gray color; the angora, with its long, silky hair of dusky white, the favorite drawing room pet; the twisted-tailed cats of Madagascar and the red colored breed of Tobolsk — all or nearly all of these famous breeds will be there, including the prize blue-ribbon cats of other shows, while by their side, undaunted by her rivals, the "homeliest cat” will lift her unblushing face.

“All of you know by this time that the cat is a very ancient institution, dating back for thousands of years; but while the subject of cats is an old one, the cats at the coming show will not be ancient subjects, even though they have their reputed nine lives with them. At any rate they will not be so old as to have ceased to be interesting. At the same time, it is to be hoped they will not have the same paralyzing effect in Rochester that they once had in Egypt, when the shrewd general of an opposing army, knowing the superstition of the Egyptians, headed his army with cats, whereupon the horrified natives fell back, not daring to touch the sacred felines, and the army marched into the city.

“But cats, the useful, the beautiful and the wonderful, do not end the list of attractions at the coming show. There will be a fine display of goldfish, Japanese and American, and last but not least, there will be cavies (guinea pigs) of all sorts and colors. Just here the committee wishes to have corrected the report that the exhibition is to include a collection of calves, a mistake arising doubtless from a misunderstanding of the word cavies. Not that the committee would be understood as considering an exhibition of calves in the least objectionable, except as the subjects might not appear graceful in cages; of the sizes that must be used in the show.”

It is promised by the committee of the Wellesley Club, under whose auspices the cat show is to be given, that the entertainment will be most unique and pleasing. I No one should miss paying a visit to Fitzhugh hall during the exhibition, which opens at noon Wednesday and continues until noon Saturday. Besides receiving more than the worth of their money, those who attend will have the gratification of knowing they are contributing toward a Rochester scholarship at Wellesley College, which will be something for Rochesterians to be proud of.

HIGH-BRED CATS – Democrat and Chronicle, November 19, 1901
The following patronesses have been announced for the cat show which will commence to-morrow noon at Fitzhugh hall; Mrs. Frederick P. Allen, Mrs. Henry F. Burton, Mrs. Harry Langdon Brewster, Mrs. J. Warren Cutler, Mrs. Newton M. Collins, Mrs. Henry G. Danforth, Dr. Elizabeth Denio, Mrs. A. O. Fenn, Mrs. Albert H. Harris, Mrs. Sumner Hayward, Mrs. John Howe, Mrs. Max Landsberg; Miss Alida Lattimore, Mrs. George Loomis, Mrs. Alexander M. Lindsay, Mrs. W. A. Montgomery, Mrs. Henry Perkins, Mrs. J. Harry Stedman, Mrs. H. W. Sibley, Mrs. W. R. Taylor, Mrs. James Watson, Mrs. Warham Whitney, Miss Clara Wilder, Mrs. Frederick Will and Miss Marion Wright.

A feature of the show will be a number of “cat parties,” and interest grows daily In the exhibition, which will absorb the attention of local society the remainder of the week. The variety of feline tribes that will be up for inspection by the general public is large and the show will be exceedingly entertaining and instructive, even to people not well up on the subject of fancy breeds of cats.

SECOND ANNUAL SHOW OF CATS AND CAVIES – Democrat and Chronicle, November 21, 1901

The second annual cat show, and cavy and ornamental fish exhibition, under the patronage of the Wellesley Club of this city and the Beresford Cat Club of Chicago, opened in Fitzhugh hall yesterday. The greater portion of the afternoon was devoted to arranging the exhibits, but in the evening the show had been gotten well under way and was enjoyed by a very large number of visitors.

In a general way there are many more feline exhibits than at the very successful show held at the same hall one year ago. It was also the opinion of many visitors that the individual merits of candidates for ribbons ranked higher than at the first exhibition, which is saying much. Certain it is that there are many cats of high degree now purring and posing for the admiration of visitors to the big exhibition hall. There are long-haired cats and short-haired cats, maltese and tabby cats, tortoiseshell cats, cats from Persia and the land of the Turk and tailless Manx cats. In fact, the collection is the largest ever brought together in Rochester, and is said to include some of the most valuable cats in the world. The number of exhibits from out of town is very large.

The collection of cavies, or guinea pigs, while not so large, is very attractive to lovers of those animals, and includes many interesting specimens. The collection of ornamental fish, exhibited by George W. Smith, of this city, attracted much attention yesterday afternoon and last evening, and is said to be the largest collection ever shown here.

Perhaps the rarest specimens of cats are in the tortoise-shell family. It seems that male tortoise-shell cats are so scarce that they are almost unknown. It was stated by E. N. Barker, one of the judges, that he had never seen but three male tortoiseshell cats with white, one of which is in the present collection, and had never before seen a male tortoise-shell cat without white, and had only hteard of two before. The present collection contains one without white. Usually, it is explained, only take on the peculiar turquoise [sic. tortoise?] markings.

Mrs. Kimball’s male tortoise-shell Baby, which is valued at $1,000, but which could probably not be purchased at any price, has the distinction of being one of the three male tortoise-shell cats with white known. It is a magnificently marked animal and attracted much attention. It bears a first-prize ribbon.

Mrs. Mix of Aiken, N.Y., exhibits the male tortoise without white. It is smoke colored and is finely marked. It is a large animal, three or four years old. It was imported from England, where it took five first and two championship prizes. Mrs. Mix exhibits two valuable female tortoise shells.

There is a good general collection of short-haired or ordinary cats, which were not reached by the judges yesterday. They receive their awards of vari-colored ribbons to-day, in accordance with their merit.

The display of Persian cats is very large and generally meritorious. One, pure white, with blue eyes, attracted much attention. It is an importation from Turkey, and is 2 years old. It is exhibited by Miss Detroit.

John Robin, of New York, exhibits two very handsome blue Persians, and Mrs. Bond shows a notable specimen of the black Persian, which is nearly the largest animal in the collection. Then there are brown tabbies, imported from England, and many other varieties, some of which have yet to be visited by the judges.

A very notable exhibit, and one which elicits much admiration from judges of cats of high degree, is Silver Chieftain, a light Silver male, imported from Persia. It took the first prize at the Crystal Palace at London. It is entered by Mrs. Conlisk, of Buffalo. It was the proud possessor of a first prize ribbon last evening.

The awards, so far as announced, are given below:

LONG-HAIRED CATS
Class 2, white female - Miss Detroit, first; Miss Wright’s Lilith, second.
Class 4, blue male - Mr Robbin's Simon D., first; Mr. Robbin’s Robert J. second.
Class 6, orange yellow – Mrs. Chapman’s Rufus, first; Red Arthur, second.
Class 7, cream or fawn, no white – Mrs. Mix’s Dairy Maid, first.
Class 9, brown tabby, female, no white – Mrs. Edith K. Neel’s cat, first; Mrs. Bond’s Shadu’h Mulk, second.
Class 11, chinchilla or shaded silver – mrs. Conlisk’s Silver Chieftain, first.
Class 14, smoke female – Mrs. Mix’s Lady Love, first; Mrs. Conlisk’s Katiedid, second.
Class 15, brown or gray tabby – Peggy, first.
Class 17, tortoiseshell, with or without white – Mrs Mix’s Tootie Diana Fawe, first; Rupata, second.
Class 18, any other color, no white – Mrs. Mix’s Kink [King?] of the Silvers, first; Mrs. Chapman’s Miss Ophelia, second.

LONG-HAIRED KITTENS
Class 20, best white, black or blue, solid colors – Mr. Robins’s Blue Girl, first; mr. neye’s Dimple, second.
Class 22, brown, gray or silver tabby – Mrs. Chapman’s tags, first; Sargent Force’s Jupiter, second.
Class 23, silver or smoke – Mrs. Mix’s Jack Frost, first; Mr. Robin’s Rosa, second.
Class 24, any other color – Mrs. Mix’s Oriole, first; Mrs. Charles Smith’s Colonel, second.

LONG-HAIRED NEUTERS
Class 26, white, blue or black – Mrs. Chapman’s Little Billee, first.
Class 27, any other color, tabby, with white – Charles Smith’s Rossie, first; Miss Wetmore’s Bennie, second.

SHORT-HAIRED OR ORDINARY CATS
Class 29, white male or female – Mrs. J. Schlitzer’s Trilby, first; Cat, second.
Class 30, black male or female – Mallory & Thomas’s Topsy II, first; Louis Pierce’s Nig, second.
Class 31, blue or maltese, male or female – Elsie Caring’s Jack, first; Walter E. Copp’s Tiddlewinks, second.
Class 32, brown tabby, male or female, no white – Miss Florence Williams’s Boots, first; Mrs. Shellhorn’s Minnie, second.
Class 33, gray tabby, no white, male or female – Mr Draper’s Tommie, first; Mr rabbitt’s Otis, second.
Class 35, orange or yellow tabby, male or female, no white – Mr Draper’s Mete, first.
Class 36, tortoise shell, with or without white, male or female – Mrs. Kimball’s Baby, first; Mr Draper’s Lassie second.
Class 37, brown or gray tabby, with white, male or female – Mr Dodge’s Topsy, first; Mrs. Dransfield’s Collins, with her family, second.
Class 38, silver, orange or yellow tabby, with white, male or female – Miss Dodge’s Queen Mab, first; Fuzzy, second.
Class 39, blue and white, or black and white, male or female – Richard Ludolph’s Beauty, first; Cox’s Cure, second.
Class 40, any other color, with or without white – Miss Dukelow’s Pug, first; Mr Draper’s Smut, second.

MANX
Class 41, male – Mrs. Terwilliger’s Bob, first.

KITTENS
Class 42, white, black or blue – Sam B. Palmer’s Topsy, first; Mr. Draper’s Jet, second.
Class 43, any other color – Miss Brown’s Topsy, first; Miss Townsend’s Queen Victoria, second.

Other prizes will be awarded today. During the evening a very pleasing entertainment was given by a company of trained dogs, monkey’s cats and white rats, under the management of M. Dubec. The animals performed numerous feats which amused some of the older visitors as well as the children. The exhibition will remain open during the remainder of the week.

PUSSY’S LAST APPEARANCE – Democrat and Chronicle, November 23rd, 1901

The cat show at Fitzhugh hall closes at noon to-day. School children of all ages wil1 be admitted for 10 cents, and they should not fail to see the cat circus, the last performance of which will be given at 11 o'clock this morning. Each child will be given an opportunity to vote for his or her favorite cat, at a cost of 1 cent, or six votes for five. One little enthusiast yesterday put in 72 votes for one cat.

An interesting event occurred Thursday night at the hall, in the birth of two tiny cavies, the mother of which is very proud. It only takes six hours for cavies to reach the stage of development at which they “take notice,” and at the end of that period these little ones were cheerfully gnawing carrots. They were the objects of much admiration yesterday.

The attendance was unusually large last night and yesterday afternoon, the largest since the show opened. The way to see the animals in comfort is to go early before the crowds begin to pour in.

A special prize was given yesterday to Mrs. Miller’s Jerry. It was a silver cup: “ from Pussy’s friends.” The cats were all lively last night, the kittens especially being very playful. Two white kittens that look like animated snowballs were centers of attraction.

In class 52 were four cats any one of which was worthy of first prize. It was therefore decided to divide the prizes among them, giving two first and two second prizes. They were Mrs. Hollway’s William McKinley, Mrs. Ashton’s Dewey, Miss Ross's Admiral Dewey and Mrs. Van Houten's Malty, the last two taking second prizes.

Last evening the famous Wellesley cat was disposed of at auction to George Peer for $10. There were many bidders.
The show has been a gratifying success in every respect. There will be a substantial sum which the Wellesley Club will be able to add to its scholarship fund, as the result of the show, which has given the people of Rochester, the children in particular, so much genuine pleasure.

CLOSE OF CAT SHOW – Democrat and Chronicle, November 24, 1901
Fltzhugh hall was crowded yesterday up to the closing of the cat show at noon. The animal circus attracted a great number of little folk, and each child was allowed to vote for his favorite cat at a penny a vote. The famous Wellesley cat was sold at auction to George Peer for $10. A silver cup was given on Friday to Mrs. Miller’s “Jerry” as a special prize. The show has been a success in every respect, and it is believed that a substantial sum has been realized and will go to the Wellesley scholarship fund.

1902 ROCHESTER CAT SHOW

BABIES, PONIES, CATS AND DOGS – Democrat and Chronicle, December 7th, 1902
It was stated yesterday that it has been definitely decided that the Young Woman’s Christian Association of this city will, through its Gymnasium Committee, hold a two weeks’ Pet Show and Fair in this city during the first two weeks of February. This project has been under discussion for several days, but it was not until yesterday afternoon that a decision was reached.

The Gymnasium Committee held a meeting yesterday afternoon at which A. R. Rogers, who is the owner of Jim Key, the horse on exhibition last week at Fitzhugh Hall under the auspices of the Rochester Humane Society, was present. A contract was signed with him, and there will be a meeting of the committee the first thing this week to get the work started at once. The plan and scope of the undertaking will be laid out immediately. The ladies are enthusiastic and unanimously agreed to undertake the enterprise. It is hoped to make it one of the largest events ever held in Rochester, to raise the sum of between $3,000 and $10,000 for the use of the association.

The Pet Show and Fair will be held in Fitzhugh Hall, and, for the purpose of utilizing all possible room, the galleries and space between will be floored over. In addition to this, the large rooms that are located in the so-called attic will be fixed up and thus the entire floor space that can be used will exceed 7,500 square feet.

The plans have not yet been made in detail, of course, but on Wednesday, Thursday, Friday and Saturday of the first week in February, a Cat Show will be the special attraction. On the first four days of the second week in the month, the special attraction will be a Dog Show. On the two remaining days the public will witness a Pony Show. On each evening there will be special features planned for the entertainment of the people. Among those already under way is a musical concert for the first evening. On the second evening it is thought there that may be a gymnasium exhibition by the association classes, including a basketball contest by two opposing teams of young ladies.

The Cat Show will be given under the national rules of the American Cat Show. The dog show will be governed by the American Kennel Club rules.

TO ORGANIZE A CAT CLUB – Democrat and Chronicle, December 17th, 1902
On Thursday afternoon at 4 o'clock there will be a meeting held in the Young Woman's Christian Association building for the purpose of forming a cat club. The club will be organized under the rules of the American Cat Club, and all interested are urged to be at the meeting. The club will give a cat show at the Pet Fair and Show to be held in February by the Gymnasium Committee of the association.

BABIES, CATS AND DOGS - Democrat and Chronicle, December 24, 1902
Show Under Auspices of Y. W. C. A. to be Held February 9th to 21st.
The date of the Pet Fair and Show to be promoted by the Gymnasium Committee of the Young Women‘s Christian Association has been fixed. The fair will be held February 9th to 21st at Fitzhugh Hall. On the 17th, 18th, 19th and 20th a dog show will be held under the auspices of the Rochester Kennel Club. These dates have been chosen that the dogs exhibited in New York under the auspices of the American Kennel Club may be brought direct to this city at the close of the New York show, and from here be sent to Buffalo and on to Chicago, all of which shows will be held under the rules of the American Kennel Club.

The new club will apply at once for admission into the American Cat Association, and the cat show in connection with the Pet Fair and Show will be held under the auspices of the newly organized club, according to the rules of the American association. Cats from all parts of the country are expected. The dates of the show are February 11th, 12th and 13th. The other dates of the Pet Fair and Show will be devoted to babies and ponies. It is expected this will be the biggest fair of the kind ever held in Rochester. Those back of the enterprise are very enthusiastic and believe it will be a great success.

FAMOUS CATS TO BE HERE – Democrat and Chronicle, December 30th, 1902
Exhibit of Rochester Club Will Attract Many Pussies of High Degree.
The Rochester Cat Club, recently organized, is planning to hold its first annual show in connection with the pet show and fair of the Y. W. C. A. in Fitzhugh Hall in February. The cat show will be held on February 9th, 10th and 11th. An Executive Committee, composed of Mrs. W. W. Armstrong, Miss Louise Wetmore and Mrs. Joseph Dodge, has been appointed, and its first work was to mail to all of the country's cat clubs the local club’s premium list. The club has applied for membership in the American Cat Association and there are now about fifty members.

At the exhibition next month Mrs. Clinton Locke, president of the Chicago club, will show her cat, the Beadle, the winner of many championship ribbons. Another cat from Chicago will be Sentimental Tommy, the son of Champion King Max. King Max is considered the finest cat in Boston. He has held for three successive years the first and special prizes of the Boston cat show. Some of the cats to be shown are owned in Rochester. One is Bonnie, owned by Miss Louise Wetmore, vice-president of the newly organized club. Bonnie is the son of Wychwood, owned by Miss K. L. Gage, of Brewster. N. Y. He was the second prize winner at the last Rochester show. Prince Royal, owned by Mrs. Joseph Dodge, secretary of the new organization, is also to be shown. He is a grandson of Royal Norton, one of the finest white cats in this country, owned at present by Mrs. Leland Norton, of Chicago, who was one of the judges of the cat show at the Pan-American Exposition.

Menelik III., owned by Mrs. Mabel C. Bond, of Washington, has been seen in Rochester before, and he will be shown next month. He is considered the finest black cat in America. He received the first prize at the Rochester show last year. The president of the local club, Mrs. Edith K. Neel, will exhibit many well-bred cats. At the Washington cat show, which was held recently, she captured several first prizes with her “string.”

1903 ROCHESTER CAT SHOW

PLANS FOR PET SHOW AND FAIR – Democrat and Chronicle, 18th January, 1903
POSTER COMPETITION TO ADVERTISE IT - MONEY PRIZES 0FFERED - Dogs and Cats of High "Degree Will be Shown - Tabbies Who Travel With Hot Water Bottles to Protect Them - Kennel Club Arrangement

Work is progressing rapidly and arrangements are nearing completion for the pet show and fair to be given by the Gymnasium Committee of Young Women's Christian Association from March 2d to 14th, inclusive at Fitzhugh Hall. Nearly all the chairmen of committees have been appointed, and each is making strenuous efforts to have her part of the affair the most successful feature, while gradually the vast undertaking is beginning to assume definite form.

Already the entries of cats promises the largest and best cat show ever held here, and Rochester has seen some pretty good cat shows under the arrangement of the Wellesley Club, which are fresh in the minds of the public. Some of the prominent exhibitors will be Mrs. H.A. Mix, of Old Port Akin; Mrs. E N. Barker, wife of the editor of Field and Fancy; Mrs James Conlisk, of Gowanda; Mrs. A. S. Lincoln, Worcester, Mass; Mrs. Lloyd M. Hallenbeck of Catskill, who brought the first Manx cat to this country; Mrs. J. P. Dickinson, of Morgansville, and Mrs. Mary C. Gross, of Keyport.

Mrs. W. S. Hofstra, of Garden City, L.A , president of the Atlantic City Cat Club, will be a very large exhibitor Mrs. Hofstra owns some of the finest cats In this country, and will bring them all to Rochester. One of them, an Oriental cat, traces Its ancestry direct from the palace of the King of Slam, therefore claiming royal birth. When the Crown Prince of Siam left home he took with him to Europe two favorite cats, and their grandchildren are those owned by Mrs. Hofstra. They are valued at $1,000. They are black, sleek and shining, with not a single white hair. They travel in warm baskets surrounded by hot water bottles to prevent them taking cold, to which their Eastern extraction makes them very susceptible. Mrs. Hofstra has also two chocolate and cream Siamese cats, purchased from Lady Beresford, of England; a blue Persian Toma, prize winner at the Richmond show last summer, and for which she paid $250. Then she has four brown tabbies, grandchildren of Persimmon, of London, the most famous cat in the world. Besides these there are many fine local cats which will have no reason to feel ashamed of their more aristocratic company in Fitzhugh Hall.

PET SHOW AND FAIR – Democrat and Chronicle, 28th January, 1903
How Rochester Enterprise is Regarded in Other Cities.
The following article published In the New York Daily America, a leading sporting paper, shows that A. R. Rogers who has charge of the Pet Show and Fair to be given in this city In March, is the “right man in the right place.” [. . .] “Mr. Rogers’ next enterprise will be at Rochester, N. Y., lasting two weeks. March 2 - 14. It will be given under the auspices of the Gymnasium Committee of the Young Women's Christian Association. This will be a cat show under the American Cat Club rules, lasting three days, by the Rochester Cat Club, at which 300 cats are expected. A dog show, lasting four days, under the A. K. S. rules by the Rochester Dog Club, at which Spratt is arranging to bench 600 dogs. An automobile and bicycle show, a pony show by the Pony Club, and, In addition, during the two weeks, there will be a food fair, merchants’ fair and sportsmen’s show.

“Mr. Rogers has his hands full, and has promised the Y. W. C. A. $10,000 profit. This pet show fair Is something of a novelty. There have been cat shows, dog shows and pet stock shows, but these are the first shows that cover the entire field. Mr, Rogers is a member of most of the kennel clubs, cat and cavey clubs, and there is a big field open in this line.”

SPECIAL MEETING OF LOCKHAVEN CAT CLUB – Democrat and Chronicle, 3rd February, 1903
To Be Held This Evening at Headquarters Pet Show and Fair, No. 118 Franklin Street.
A special meeting of the Lockhaven Cat Club has been called for this afternoon, at 3 o’clock, at the office of the Pet Show and Fair, in the Young Women’s Christian Association building, No. 118 Franklin street. Mr. Rogers, superintendent of the cat show, which is to be held during the first week of the Pet Show and Fair, in March, will make a report, and reports from the various committees will also be submitted.

The members of the club feel very much encouraged over the coming cat show, which will not only be the largest ever held in Rochester, but is expected to be the largest ever held in America. The many applications for entries that are being received not only from the residents of Rochester but from New York, Boston and Chicago, show that the interest is widespread. The only fear is that the managers will be unable to care for as many cats as will be entered, as Fitzhugh Hall space is limited.

Many beautiful prizes have been offered by friends and cat lovers, the latest one just received being a set of Empire coops or cages in which cats are exhibited.

Cat owners as well as those interested in cats are invited to attend this meeting, so that they may know the general plans of this, the third championship cat show ever held in Rochester. Mr. Rogers reports that over fifty ladies from New York and Boston have promised not only to bring their cats, but to come themselves, and many have never exhibited outside of their own city. One of the rules that may be of Interest to cat lovers is that cats may be taken home at night. It would be wise for those desiring to exhibit their cats, if they would send their applications at once, as all classes are limited.

Rochester is celebrated for its short- haired cats. E. N. Barker, editor of Field and Fancy, who judged at the cat show last year, said that he had never seen at any show so many fine short-haired cats as he had seen in Rochester. It is a fact that in many homes there are cats which the owners do not realize are very valuable, and would carry away all the caps and prizes at any show.
In arranging the cat show this year the committee has made two divisions in each regular class. One known as the novice, and the other as the open. The novice class is for cats that have never won a first or second prize. The open is for any cat, prize-winner or not. The advantage of this to the local cat which enters in a novice class is that it does not have to compete against prize winners. The committee will be very glad to see at the meeting this afternoon all those who desire to enter their cats, or are interested in the cat show. All members are earnestly requested to be present.
The classification of both long- and short- haired cats is a very large one. It includes every known breed, and many that are not known. There are thirty-two classes of the open class, long-haired cats, and sixty-two classes of the novice class, long-haired cats. In the classification of short-haired cats, there are ninety classes of the open class and 117 of the novice class. The classes are divided according to sex, color of fur, color of eyes, etc. Some of the best known breeds are white, black, blue, brown or gray tabby, and other colored tabbies, tortoiseshell, smoke, Siamese, Manx, Maltese, etc.

SILVER CHALLENGE CUPS FOR CAT SHOW PRIZES CLUB – Democrat and Chronicle, 4th February, 1903
Beresford Club of Chicago Will Offer Them - Classification of the Toms and Tabbies.
The members of the Lockehaven Cat Club of Rochester, which is to hold a three days’ cat show at Fitzhugh Hall during the Pet Show and Fair given under the auspices of the Gymnasium Committee of the Young Women’s Christian Association, held a meeting yesterday afternoon at the fair headquarters, No. 118 Franklin street. A. R. Rogers, superintendent of the show, was present, and made a report of the progress of events to date. Many premiums have been promised by merchants of the city, as well as clubs and individuals from out of the city. It is hoped the list will be completed as soon as possible.

The Beresford Cat Club of Chicago, one of the patrons of this show, has wired to the Cat Committee in charge of the cat show that it will offer beautiful silver challenge cups for the first time outside of Chicago for competition. Rochester is considered to have the finest short-haired cats in the country, for which special prizes and cups will be offered.

The judges of the cat show have been appointed. Mrs. E. N. Barker, wife of the editor of Field and Fancy, who judged the last two cat shows held in Rochester, will judge the long-haired cats. She is considered one of the very best judges iu the country of this class. Mrs. Lane, of Chicago, well known to all cat lovers and who has judged all the big shows in the West, will act as judge for all kittens and neuters. T. Farrar Rackham, of Newark, N. J.. the greatest judge of short-hairs in the world, has been engaged to judge the short-hairs at the coming show.

One special feature will be appreciated, and one of many innovations that will be introduced at this cat show, is that no judge will be allowed to exhibit any of his or tier own cats. The entry fee for cats is $1. Entries for cats may be sent to Mrs. J. H. Dodge, secretary, No 168 Harvard street, or to Miss Louise S. Wetmore, No. 84 Fitzhugh street. The entries will close the 25th of this month to be catalogued. The following are the classifications of cats, by carefully looking over which cat owners may see at a glance in which class his or her cat belongs:

The long-haired cats are classified in the open class, any cat except neuter eligible to enter, and the novice class for cats never having won a first prize. The open class will admit the following thirty-two varieties:

All comers, males, any color:;all comers, female, any color; white, males, blue eyes; white, females, blue eyes: white, males, golden eyes; white, females, golden eyes; black, male; black, female: blue, male; blue, female: cream, male; cream, female; orange, male; orange, female; orange tabby, male; orange tabby, female; smoke, male; smoke, female; silver, male; silver, female; silver tabby, male; silver tabby, female; brown or gray tabby, male; brown gray tabby, female; tortoiseshell, male: tortoiseshell, female; tortoiseshell and white, male: tortoiseshell and white, female; any color tabby and white, male; any color tabby with white, female; any other color, male; any other color, female.

The novice class will admit of the following: White, males, blue eyes; white, females, blue eyes; white, males, golden eyes; white, females, golden eyes; black, male; black, female, blue, male; blue, female; cream, male; cream, female; orange, male; orange, female; orange tabbv, male; orange tabby, female: smoke, male; smoke, female; silver, male; silver, female; silver tabby, male; silver tabby, female; brown and gray tabby, male; brown or gray tabby, female; tortoiseshell, male; tortoiseshell, female; tortoiseshell and white, male; tortoiseshell and white, female; any color tabby with white, male; any color tabby with white, female; any other color, male; any other color, female.

The open class for short-haired cats admits: All comers, males, any color; all comers, females, any color; white, males; white, females; black, male; black, female, blue (Maltese), male; blue (Maltese), female; brown or gray tabby, male; brown or gray tabby, female; orange or orange tabby, male; orange or orange tabby, female; silver tabby, male; silver tabby. female: tortoiseshell, with or without white, male; tortoiseshell, with or without white female; smoke, male, smoke, female; any color tabby with white, male; any color tabby with white, female; any color cat, with or without white, male; any other color cat, with or without white, male; any other color, cat, with or without white, female.

Foreign cats: Siamese, male; Siamese, female: Manx, male; Manx, female; any other variety; wild cats

The novice class for short-haired varieties admits the following: All comers, male, any color; all comers, female, any color; white, male; white, female; black, male- black, female; blue (Maltese), male; blue (Maltese), female; brown tabby, male; brown tabby, female; orange or orange tabby, male; orange or orange tabby, female; silver or gray tabby, male; silver of gray tabbv, female; tortoiseshell, with or without white, male; tortoiseshell, with or without white, female; smoke, male, smoke female; any color tabby with white, male; any color tabby with white, female; any other color cat, with or without white, male; any other color cat, with or without white, female.
Foreign cats: Siamese, male; Siamese, female; Manx, male; Manx, female; any other variety.

ATTRACTIONS OF PET SHOW-FAIR – Democrat and Chronicle, 18th February, 1903
The cat show, which will follow on March 4th, 5th and 6th under the auspices of the Lockehaven Cat Club of this city, will be the largest event of its kind ever held in America, so the management confidently announces. It is given under the patronage of the Beresford Cat Club of Chicago and the Atlantic Cat Club of New York city. All entries that are to be published in the official catalogue of the show must be made before February 25th. Any inquiries may be sent to the secretary at the Y. W. C. A. building, No. 153 Clinton avenue north. The entry fee for each cat or kitten is $1, and a free admission ticket for the three days of the show is given each person entering a cat. The show is given under the rules of the American Cat Show Committee.

It is not necessary that a cat or kitten to enter the show should be listed, or have a pedigree. There are many fine short-haired cats in Rochester, and if your cat has never been exhibited before, it may win a prize or a ribbon at the coming show. A great number of special prizes bare been offered at this show. They include a gold piece for the best male or female of the long-haired variety, given by Mrs. D. Cutler, of Detroit, Mich.; a $5 gold piece for the best silver longhaired male or female bred in America, given by Mrs. F.G.S. Sarmiento, Detroit, Mich., and a $5 gold piece for the best brown longhaired tabby, female, given by Mrs. L. W. Barren, Detroit, Mich.

PRIZE LIST IN THE CAT AND DOG SHOWS – Democrat and Chronicle, 19th February, 1903
The cat prize list, which consists of twenty-eight pages, is being mailed to-day, and is not only handsomely illustrated but contains six pages of prizes, rules and classification and general information. There are many classes of kittens and neuters, and in addition, there are special classes of brace of kittens and cats, teams of kittens and cats, and classes for cats shown by firemen and policemen, and a special class for the best office cat found in Rochester, also a special class of the homeliest and the handsomest cat exhibited by a school child. This is the most elaborate prize list that has been issued by any cat show, and can be secured by calling upon Mr. Rogers. In regards to cats Mr. Rogers wants to also emphasize the fact that in judging them the judge does not look to the pedigree, but judges entirely on the merit of the cat.

KING AND QUEEN OF THE CATTERY – Rochester Democrat and Chronicle, 22nd February, 1903

It is expected that dainty puss will be the most talked of animal in Rochester on March 4th, 5th and 6th, during the annual cat show of the Lockehaven Cat Club, of this city, given during the Pet Show and Fair of the Gymnasium Committee of the Young Women’s Christian Association, at Fitzhugh Hall, from March 24 to 14th, inclusive. If she doesn’t have her head completely turned by all the admiration which she will receive, and the singing of her praise by the daily press, to say nothing of the thousands who will go to pay her homage, it will be because she is so accustomed to that sort of thing that she has come to expect it as a matter of course, and would feel strange without it.

The accompanying cats show some of the magnificent specimens that have been entered at this cat show, kings and queen of famous catteries. “Teddy Roosevelt” is a Paris kitten, particularly proud of his splendid tail, as he has a right to be. He is owned by Mrs. L.C. Kemp of Huron, S.D. He has blue eyes, a perfect hearing, was sired by Paris, and has taken first prize. Zodac and Zenda are two cunning kittens, two months’ old, grandsons of Teddy.

The two little bright-eyed dark kittens are named “Bully Boy” and “Lady Love” and are from Mrs. Mix’s “Old Fort Cattery,” Akin, N.Y. Mrs. Mix is a very large importer and breeder of some very fine stock. She refused $500 for one kitten at the recent New York cat show. Mrs. Mix will be a large exhibitor at the Rochester show.

“Oma,” the beautiful white cat of aristocratic bearing and an expression of ennui, as if wearied with so much adulation, is owned by Mrs. C.H. Marlleng, of Nashville, Texas.

These are only sample cats, so to speak, of the many beautiful pets that will be exhibited at the show which [it] is expected will be one of the largest ever held in America.

Entries for the Rochester Cat Show, to be published in the catalogue, must be in not later than Wednesday, February 25th. There are many beautiful short-haired cats as well as long-haired ones owned in this city, and it is expected that there will be a large entry of local cats. As the Pet Show and Fair, under whose management the cat show is conducted, gives a season pass during the cat show, to everyone that enters his or her cat, which includes the caging and feeding of the animal while at the show, many are sending their cats, as it will cost more to buy admissions each day than it would to pay the entry fee. Besides, there is the chance of winning some of the handsome prizes.

It takes over five pages in the prize list to enumerate the many beautiful prizes that have been offered by cat lovers and friends of the Lockehaven Cat Club, under whose auspices the show will be given. Mrs. Joseph Hampton Dodge, No. 168 Harvard street, the secretary, and Miss Louise Wetmore, No. 84 South Fitzhugh street, vice-president, have entry blanks and prize lists, or these can be secured of A.R. Rogers, superintendent, at the Y.W.C.A. building, No. 153 Clinton avenue north.

The cat show this year will contain many more classes than they have in the past, and there are special classes for cats to be exhibited by school children, which is expected to draw a large entry, and to cause a great deal of interest. The prizes are two handsome kodaks to be given to the pupil in the schools of Rochester who exhibits the homeliest cat and the handsomest cat. A special entrance fee of only fifty cents is charged the children, which includes a ticket of admission.

Another special class is for cats exhibited by policemen or firemen. Quite a number of entries have been received in each of these classes, especially from the station houses and fire engine houses, and keen rivalry is expected as to which has the best cat.

Many entries in long-haired varieties are being received from out of the city, and some of the most valuable cats in the United States will be on exhibition here.

The committee is receiving word daily from lovers and owners of cats, that they expect not only to send their cats to Rochester, but to come themselves. Special arrangements are being made for the care of the cats during the show. The Spratt Company cages have been engaged, and every attention that can possibly be given them in feeding and handling will be looked after. A special feature that has never been in use at any other cat show is having an inclosed run made in the building, so that cats can get exercise. All cats are caged separately, unless requested to be caged together, and they can be taken home nights if so desired.

Intending exhibitors should get their entries in immediately, so as to have their cats properly catalogued.

The official poster for the Pet Show and Fair is out and is exceedingly clever. It shows Mrs. Cat riding in an automobile pushed by Mr. Dog. Seated beside Mrs. Cat on the front seat is little Miss Cavy. They are on their way to “The Pet Show and Fair,” and in the distance is seen the pony doing a clever stunt. It is an excellent design, and very prettily developed in the most posteresque manner. Large colored posters advertising both the cat, dog and pony show will soon decorate the whole city. They are most attractive and cannot fail of their mission.

The poster contest which all artists were invited to enter will close the 25th of this month. Entries have been coming in daily to Miss M. Louise Stowell, chairman of this committee, whose studio is in Powers building, where all posters should be addressed. The prizes given in this contest are very liberal, the first one being $20. Mechanics Institute students are urged to enter this contest and all others who are interested.

PET SHOW AND FAIR – Democrat and Chronicle, 23rd February 1903
W. J. Gram to Close Entries with Boston Exhibitors - Cats and Cavies.
W. J. Gram, secretary of the Rochester Kennel Club, has been sent by the Pet Show and Fair to Boston and left last night to attend the Boston Dog Show which is on this week. [. . .] A. R. Rogers, the superintendent, will be at the office of the Pet Show and Fair, Y. M. C. A. Building, every day this week as well as Tuesday and Wednesday evenings, and will give any information and help exhibitors [need] in making out their entry slips. No entries for dogs can be received after Wednesday [25th] at 12 o'clock midnight.

Entries for cats can be sent either to Mr. Rogers, to Mrs. Joseph Hampton Dodge, No. 168 Harvard street, or to Miss Louise Wetmore, 84 South Fitzhugh street. It is desired by the Lockehaven Cat Club that exhibitors will try and get their entries for cats in by Wednesday, February 25th, so that they will be able to get them properly catalogued.

One important point In connection with the Cat Show is that a cat to enter the show need not be registered nor have a pedigree. The ordinary well trained household pet will be as cordially welcomed to a place in the exhibit as the cats of the longest and purest lineage. There are classes for every breed of cats as well as for dogs, so that every household that has a dog or a cat may be sure there is a place for their pet in this pet show.

The Cat Show and Cavy Show Is to be held Wednesday, Thursday and Friday of the first week, three days only, and the Dog Show four days of the following week, March 10th, 11th, 12th and 13th. Both the cats and dogs will be fed and taken care of by the committee, unless the exhibitor wishes to feed them himself. Cats will be kept in clean cages that are thoroughly disinfected, and the dogs are benched in thoroughly disinfected benches or kennels. One item that many do not seem to know Is that both dogs and cats may be taken home at night by the owners, if they so desire.

CATS OF HIGH DEGREE – Democrat and Chronicle, 28th February, 1903
Among the cats entered for the pet show next week are two valued at $1,000 each. One Is “Baby," the famous short hair tortoiseshell cat, owned by Mrs. F. Kimball, of Natick, Mass. “Baby" is acknowledged by cat fanciers to be the best specimen of the tortoise-shell cat ever shown in America. She has won first prizes at the last three annual fairs at Boston, also first prizes at Worcester, Providence, Hartford, Buffalo, Washington and Philadelphia. The other $1,000 rat to be shown here next week is a blue Persian, "Champion Lupin,” owned by Mrs. C. A. White, of Chicago, Ill.

The entries for cats will not close until Wednesday morning, the opening day of the cat show. The committee wishes to remind the school children of the special prize of a Kodak, which has been offered for the best cat shown by either boys or girls, also the special prizes offered for the best cats shown by policemen and letter carriers.

The list of patrons and patronesses for the pet show is not yet completed, but among the prominent citizens of Rochester and other parts of the state who have consented to act are the following: Lieutenant-Governor and Mrs. Frank W. Higgins, Senator Jotham P. Allds, Hon. and Mrs. Frederick Cook. Hon. and Mrs. John Van Voorhis Mr. and Mrs. Granger Hollister, Mr. and Mrs. Warham Whitney, Mr. and Mrs. William N. Cogswell, Mr. and Mrs. Charles P. Barry, Mr. and Mrs. G. D. B. Bonbright, Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Farley, Mr. and Mrs. John O. Brewster, Mr. and Mrs. Frank H. Clements, Mr. and Mrs. William C. Walker, Mr. and Mrs. Henry A. Strong.

PET SHOW AND FAIR OPENS MONDAY NIGHT –Democrat and Chronicle, 1st March, 1903
Governor and Mrs. Odell Are Among the Patrons.
The Pet Show and Fair, about which so much has been said for so many weeks past, will open to-morrow evening at Fitzhugh Hall, and continue for two weeks, under the auspices of the Gymnasium Committee of the Young Women s Christian Association. Expectation is on the qui vive, for much has been promised for this entertainment, which bids fair to eclipse anything of the kind ever attempted here before. For months past, Mrs. W.W. Armstrong .chairman of the Pet Show and Fair Committee, and A. K. Rogers, of New York, superintendent, have been busy perfecting their plans and appointing committees and making arrangements. Now everything is completed, and as stated, tomorrow will be the opening night of what will comprise a cat and cavy, dog and pony show as well as a fair of no ordinary character.

Some of the best known people of the city have lent their names as patrons of the enterprise and yesterday it was announced by Mrs. Armstrong that Governor and Mrs. Odell were among the patrons. Other names received to those already published in the Democrat and Chronicle are Mr. and Mrs. Hiram W. Sibley, and Mrs. Henry G. Danforth.

[. . .] Beginning Wednesday afternoon, the cat show will open, and the Pet Show and Fair will be on “Full Blast,” so to speak. The cat show will be given under the management of the Lockhaven cat Club, and the American Cat Show Committee rules will prevail. The entry list in this contest remains open until Wednesday. The present officers of the Lockhaven Cat Club are: President, Mrs Edith k. Neel, Urbana, NY; first vice-president, Miss Louise S. Wetmore, Rochester, NY; secretary, Mrs Joseph Hampton Dodge, Rochester, NY; treasurer, Mrs Alfred Jackson, Rochester, NY; Executive Committee, Miss Louise S Wetmore, chairman; Mrs Joseph Hampton Dodge, Mrs Alfred Jackson, Mrs William W Armstrong, Mrs Edith K Neel. Albert R Rogers, of New York City is the superintendent.

Albert R Rogers, superintendent of the show, on behalf of the committee, has issued the following statement: “The management of this cat show has made a decided innovation in the matter of prizes. It will be noticed that no cash prizes are offered but in addition to the beautiful ribbons and the handsome medals and challenge cups offered by the cat clubs, a very large number of specials will be offered – many of which we are unable to announce at the early date on which we print this list. The stand which we take after consulting with over fifty prominent cat lovers and exhibitors, officials of cat clubs, editors and judges, is as follows:

“The cat lover and owner does not send his cat to a cat show to see how much money he can make out of it, but purely from his interest in cats and a pride in his own pets. That the owner of a cat cares more for the blue rosette or piece of plate or whatever the prize is that he wins than for $2 or $3 cash all agree (except a few whose only interest is dollars and cents). We desire to eliminate the professionalism [meaning exhibiting as a business or only for financial gain] from this cat show; we are aware that there are a few catteries who look at it only from the monetary side; these we may not have. But the lovers of the cat who are not only interested in them but are proud of their pets - the lady or gentleman who does not aspire to be a professional - we expect will take even more pains and make greater effort to enter their cats than they would if we offered a big premium in cash to pay them for coming.”

PET SHOW OPENS WITH GYMNASTICS. CATS HOLD SWAY TO-NIGHT SHOW – Democrat and Chronicle, 2nd March, 1903
Many Rochester Pussies Entered for This Exhibit Which is to Continue to Friday — Long List of Special Prizes Offered.
The managers of the pet show and fair will give their special attention until Wednesday of this week to receiving entries of cats, an exhibition of which will open the show. It will continue to Friday night. A number of Rochester cat lovers have already entered their pets for the show, though it is expected the list of exhibitors will be much larger before the show opens. Last year there were nearly 100 Rochester cats entered for the show and this season, when preparations are on a much larger scale and when the Atlantic Cat Club, of New York, and the Beresford Cat Club, of Chicago, are participating in the exhibition, there should be 200 cats from Buffalo.

Among the entries which have already been made are the following:
Mrs. Emil R. Roller. No. 334 Garson avenue, short-hair black, Peter.
Miss Clara Bogner, No. 232 Hudson avenue, blue, Honey.
Miss May Bragdon, No. 34 Hubbell park, orange and white short-hair, Zoro.
Mrs. George C Bragdon, No. 34 Hubbell park, orange tabby, short-hair, Zenda.
Walter P. Copp, No. 34 Holmdel place, blue-and white maltese, John Thomas.
Miss Elizabeth Cramer, No. 10 Grove street, short-haired cat,Chubb.
Miss Marjorie Fowler, No. 272 Alexander street, manx, Prudheim.
Miss Elizabeth B. Fitch, No. 35 Harper street, gray angora tabby, greylocks.
Miss F. M. Hibbard, Hubbard Park Orphan Asylum, common solid black Topsy, and common blue maltese, Malta.
Mrs. Alfred Jackson, No. 143 Meigs street, black Persian, Prince Chub.
August F. Kuehler, No. 391 Lyell avenue, short-haired, Nellie Bly.
Miss Grace R. Lawrence, No. 725 Troup street, silver tabby, Romeo.
Mrs. Andrew Ludolph, No. 8 Chamberlain street, short-hair. Beauty.
Mrs. J. D. McFiggins, No. 4 Sterling street, short-hair cat, Jack, gray and black stripe cat, Sam.
Mrs. C. S. Pickett, No. 66 Pierpont street, Tweeters.
Mrs. Clara U. Smith, No. 852 St. Paul street, tortoise-shell and white, Tiger Lily.
The Misses Wehle, No. 675 Main street, longhair silver, Lord Southampton.

Following is a list of special prizes:

Atlantic Cat Club challenge cups (New York city) — No. 1. best long-haired white; No. 2. best long haired black; No. 3. best long haired blue; No. 4. best long-haired silver; No. 5. best long-haired smoke; No. 6. best long-haired orange or cream; No. 7. best long-haired silver tabby; No. 8. best long haired brown tabby.
An Atlantic Club medal will be given outright to each challenge cup winner.
The Beresford Cat Club offers its six challenge cups.
The Beresford Cat Club of America offers the following challenge cups; First prize winning males in the open «lass, belonging to members of the Beresford Cat Club of America, and shown under the American cat show rules in any city the club may designate. Each cup to be won three times before becoming the property of the winner. The winner to belong to the same owner or cattery and a cat of the same color, but not necessarily the same cat. At least one win to take place in Chicago.
The Beresford Cat Club offers four Beresford medals — No. 1. best long-haired white male or female: No. 2, best longhaired orange, male or female, belonging to the B.C.C. of A.; No. 3. best Rochester cat, long haired; No. 4, best Rochester cat, short haired.
The Pet Show and Fair, desirous of making this the popular class of the show, offer four fine cameras or kodaks as prizes, one in each of the four all-comers classes.
A.R. Rogers offers a handsome sterling silver cup, value $50, to winner of best display. The name of winner and a picture of a cat will be etched on the cup.
The Empire Cooping Co., Fultonville, N.Y. offer a standard size, double cat cage, special design, solid veneered ends, partition and back, built to order, to second best display under same rules.
Mrs. Fred Everett Smith offers a handsome cat-carrying case for the best and largest number of cats shown from one cattery.
The Pet Show and Fair offer a feeding bowl (silver plated) for best brace of cats, providing there are three entries.
The Pet Show and Fair offer a feeding bowl (silver plated) for best team cats, providing there are three entries.
The Pet Show and Fair offer a feeding bowl (silver plated) for best brace of kittens, providing there are three entries.
The Pet Show and Fair offer a feeding bowl (silver plated) for best team kittens, providing there are three entries.
Best school children’s cat owned In Rochester — The Pet Show and Fair offers under this class: An Eastman kodak for homeliest cat; an Eastman kodak, for handsomest cat.
A special will be offered for the best cat in the show entered by a Rochester policeman, provided there are three entries.
A special will be offered for the best cat in the show entered by a Rochester postman, provided there are three entries.
A special will be offered for the best office cat owned in Rochester, provided there are three entries.
A special prize will be given for the best long-haired neuter.
A special prize will be given for the best short-haired neuter.
Mrs. W. W Armstrong offers a cup for the best short-haired cat in the show.
Mrs. James Conlisk (Gowanda, N.Y.). offers a cup for the best long-haired cat in the show.
A special prize will be given for best cat in the show.
Mrs. Everett Davis offers a piece of Cloisonne for the best kitten in the show.
Mrs. D. Cutler, of Detroit, Mich., offers a $5 gold piece for best cream male or female long-haired.
Mrs. F. J. S. Sarimento, of Detroit. Mich., offers a $5 gold piece for best long-haired silver male or female, bred in America.
Mrs. L. W. Bowen, of Detroit, Mich., offers a $5 gold piece for best brown tabby female, long-haired.
Miss E. L. Burritt offers a hand-painted miniature cat head for the best orange male.
Miss Larrabee offers a silver cup for the best blue-eyed white male.
Mrs. William Chapman of Cusic Cattery offers a silver spoon for the best orange female.
Mrs. W. F. Kimball offers cash for the best short-haired tortoise-shell female, any age, with or without white.
Mrs. Florence Dyer offers an Empire coop for the best cream male.
Mrs. Edith K. Neel offers a special, to be announced later, to the best silver tabby, male.
Mrs. Edith K. Neel offers a special, to be announced later, to the best brown tabby male bred in America.
Ivanhoe "Othello” offers a silver nut dish for the best long haired black queen.
Mrs. B. P. Robinson of Chicago offers a wash drawing for the best long haired blue kitten.
Mrs. C. H. Lane, of Chicago, offers a Feverile glass vase for the best long-haired cream queen.
Mrs. Clinton Locke offers a silver cup for the best long-haired queen in the show.
Mrs. Arthur Jackson offers a handsome piece of hand painted china, for best longhaired black male.
Mrs. R. Ottolengui (New York) - Handsome sterling silver cup, for best silver male (long hair).
Miss Lucy C. Johnstone (Chicago) — Backus puppy crate, for best cream kitten, long-haired.
The gymnasium department of the Y.W.C.A. offer a very handsome sterling silver medal to the winner in each class, both long and short hairs, under the following rule: The best cat, male or female, in the kitten, novice and open classes of each designated color, to compete together for the winners’ prize in its class. The best cat of the three to be known as the winner and to be awarded the medal. These medals will be given provided two classes of three each are filled in each color. I.e. If in the silvers, the novice and open classes fill, and the kitten class did not fill three kittens, the best cat in the novice, the best in the open and the best kitten of the two, or if one only enters, it to compete, and the best of the three adjudged the winner.
Other specials are to be announced later.

A CONCERT OF HIGH STANDARD PRELIMINARY TO THE PET SHOW AND FAIR – Democrat and Chronicle, 4th March, 1903
One of the best concert programmes heard in Rochester this winter was presented last evening at Fitzhugh Hall under the auspices of the Pet Show and Fair. This concluded the two preliminary entertainments to the big animal show which begins at 1 o'clock to-day. [. . .]

At I o'clock to-day opens the cat show under the auspices of the Lockehaven Cat Club, of this city. Already the aristocratic pusses are arriving, all beautiful specimens of the feline. They came in in crates and luxurious cages yesterday afternoon, apparently none the worse from their long journey, several having come from Chicago. They were delighted, however, to be released and fed, and purred their appreciation at being permitted to stretch themselves and enjoy the fresh milk provided. Workmen were busy until a late hour last evening arranging and setting up the cages and to 1 o'clock to-day everything will be in readiness, and Miss Puss will have on her best ribbon and be all ready to receive the dear public, under the auspices of the pet show and fair, given by the Gymnasium Committee of the Young Woman's Christian Association.

[. . .] After to-day the cats and cavies will be on exhibition from 10 A. M. until 10 P. M., with a continuous performance. A new feature is announced for the cat show, and which was decided on yesterday. School children entering cats will be admitted free, and the cats will be admitted free up to the number of 100. They must all be in before 10 o'clock this morning. First come, first received. Special prises have been awarded this class. A handsome kodak will be given the homeliest cat and the handsomest cat owned by a school child, both boys and girls.

The following ladies arrived yesterday from Chicago, members of the Beresford Cat Club, under whose patronage the cat show is being given: Mrs. Charles Hampton Lane, first vice-president of the Beresford Cat Club, and judge of neuters and kittens: Mrs. Elwood H. Talman, exhibitor and treasurer of the club: Mrs. Blanche P. Robinson, director and delegate from the club; Mrs. Fred Everett Smith, delegate and exhibitor; Mrs. Josiah Cratty, exhibitor. The ladies are stopping at the Livingston Hotel.

The names of the owners who [to date] have entered cats follow: Harold E. Akerly, Mrs. M. Ashton, Mrs. Stella M. Bader, Clara Boguer, Mrs. Emma R. Boiler, Mrs. George C. Bragdon, Miss May Bragdon, Burton Brewing Company, Miss R. Frances Chapin, Mrs. Walter B. Copp, Miss Elizabeth Cramer, Master A. J. Doud, Miss Elizabeth B. Pitch, Miss Marjorie Fowler, Miss F. M. Hibbard, Mrs. Alfred Jackson, August F. Kuehler, Miss Grace B. Lawrence, Mrs. Andrew Ludolph, E. C. Mallory, Mrs. G. D. McFiggins, W. H. Mooers, Mrs. Penny, Miss Elizabeth C. Perrin, Mrs. C. S. Pickett, Salter Brothers, Mr. and Mrs. Schellhorn, Miss Maud Schellhorn, Mrs. Charles M. Smith, the Misses Wehle, Miss Florence M. Williams, Mrs. Stella Williams and Mrs. Alma J. , Wright, all of Rochester.

Mrs. J. Bain, North Chatham, N. Y.; Miss Alice Barnes, Ypsilanti, Mich.; Mrs. Maud C. Blount, Wayne, Mich.; Mrs. B. Brown, Brooklyn. N. Y.; Mrs. H. M. Brown, Fairport; Mrs. F. D. Brown, Millerton, N. Y.; Mrs. E. L. Burritt, Washington. D. C.; Mrs. W. M. Chapman, Romeo, Mich.; Mrs. J. Copperberg, West Simsbury, Conn.; Mrs. Josiah Cratty, Oak Park,Ill.; Mrs. Dwight Cutler, Detroit, Mich.; Mrs. Florence Dyer, South Weymouth, Mass.; Mrs. O. L. Dosch. Dayton. O ; Mrs. J. V. Gotwalts, Pottstown, Pa,; C. M. Hanington, Rockland, Me.; Mrs. W. F. Higgins, South Framingham, Mass.; I. A. Hix, M. D., Binghamton, N. Y.; C. H. Jones, Palmyra, N. Y.; Mrs. F. Kimball, Natick, Mass.; David S. Kindell, Philadelphia; Mrs. J. P. Mallorie, Waterside, Tunis Mills. Md.; Mrs. Mason Morrow, Allen Hill, N. Y.; Mrs. H. A. Mix, Akin, N. Y.: Mrs. Edith K. Neel, Urbana. N. Y.; Dr. Howard Stout, Neilson, New York; Mrs. Elizabeth Norton, Williamtown, Mass.; Mrs. Frank Norton, Cazenovia. N. Y.; Miss Emma E. O'Neill, Washington, D. C.; Mrs. E. R. Pierce, Cincinnati, O.; George E. Rowland, Jersey City, N. J.; Mrs. F. J. Sarmiento, Detroit, Mich.; Miss Elizabeth Sill, Geneva; Mrs. F. E. Smith, Chicago; Mrs. Edward H. Tolman, Chicago; the Misses Ruth and Estelle Ward, Brooklyn; Frank B. Wedow, Marshall, Mich.; Mrs. C. A. White, Chicago, C. W. Wurster. Ithaca.

CATS AND CAVIES THE ATTRACTION – Democrat and Chronicle, 5th March, 1903
Yesterday was a lively day at Fitzhugh Hall. It was the opening of the big cat show of the Pet Show and Fair given by the Gymnasium Committee of the Young Woman's Christian Association, whose posters have for many days decorated the windows of the downtown stores. The cat show is under the auspices of the Lockehaven Cat Club of this city, and under the patronage of the Beresford Cat Club of Chicago and the Atlantic Cat Cluh of New York, the following members of which are present: Mrs. Helena A. Mix, Akin, N.Y.; Mrs. James Conlisk, Gowanda, N. Y.; Mrs. Alma J. Wright, Phelps, N. Y.

There are about 200 beautiful cats now entered, which are receiving the adulation of the crowds who are flocking about the cages. Many fond owners help to swell the ranks, and wait close by to hear the nice things said of their pets. Yesterday morning all sorts and conditions of people were on hand to enter their cats at the last moment. They brought them in baskets and they brought them in bags, they were old and young, shabby and well dressed, all with the one common object of getting a prize for the beloved family cat.

It is safe to say that never have there been handsomer cats or more of them entered at any show in this city. Among the finest and most admired are the beautiful silver tabbies, with long, soft hair, big, intelligent eyes, and affectionate dispositions. There are several proud pussies of this class that have won innumerable blue ribbons and prizes in other shows. They wear their honors gracefully, with no undue showing of “puffedupness.”

Yesterday the judges were busy all day and last evening, both on the cats and the cavies. They will not conclude their work until this evening. Mrs. E. N. Barker, of New York, is the judge of all long-haired cats; Mrs. Charles Hampton Lane, of Chicago, is judge of the short-haired cats, kittens and neuters, and T. C. Turner, of New York, is judge of cavies. Walter O. Filley, of Rochester, is judge of school children’s cats.

About half the animals have been judged, and the awards will be made this evening. There were a number of sales yesterday of fine cats, among them being one for $75 to Mrs. Michelson, of Tarriffville, Conn., "Rob Roy;” and one to Mr. Cutler, “Belle,” for $25.

One of the strangest sights at the show is the affection between a big black cat and a large white rat. They occupy a cage together, and are the greatest chums. When they go to sleep the rat lies snuggled close to the cat, with his head on the cat’s neck. Everyone stops to see this unusual affinity. [. . .]

An Incident occurred yesterday morning that, while amusing to the onlookers, was not so pleasant to Mr. Jones of Palmyra, one of the largest exhibitors at the show. An immense cat arrived in a crate, said to be one of the largest cats ever shown. Mr. Jones put his hand in the crate to take Mr. Cat out, when the animal sprang at him and bit and scratched so viciously that the cat was crated up, and immediately returned to its owner. It was not considered safe to keep It around.

Some of the handsomest badges issued have been made for the Pet Show and Fair. The premium ribbons are also very elegant and elaborate and the cat or cavy who wins one of these will have something worthwhile. The entire arrangement of the fair is on the most elaborate scale, and too much cannot be said In praise of the efficient management. Mr. Rogers has been untiring in his efforts to make the affair a success, as has also Mrs. Armstrong, chairman of the Pet Show and Fair Committee, and the officers of the Lockehaven Cat Club. It is expected to-day will be the banner day of the cat show, and an immense crowd is expected. Those who come early will stand a much better chance of seeing the dainty pets without crowding.

BATTLE ROYAL AT PET SHOW – Democrat and Chronicle, 6th March, 1903
There was trouble yesterday among the animals at the Pet Show and Fair at Fitzhugh Hall. During the night the raccoons escaped from their cage, and made things lively around the hall. It seems that raccoons look upon rats as their special prey, and the skin of the rat as a great delicacy, not to be sneezed at. Then there was trouble. As soon as the raccoon gained his liberty he sniffed at the great white rat, which is the chum of the big black cat. The raccoon made love to the white rat in a manner that was anything but pleasing to the big black cat. The big black cat resented this familiarity, and of course there was a battle royal between the raccoon and the black cat, the latter coming out ahead and saving the life of its chum, the white rat. At late accounts the raccoon had not been recaptured. One of them was found and returned to its cage, but the other is still as liberty, probably hiding under the platform of the stage.

The attendance yesterday afternoon and evening was very large in spite of the unfavorable weather. The main feature of the afternoon was the reception held in the Oriental room by the managers of the Pet Show and Fair to the out-of-town exhibitors. This was a most enjoyable occasion, and very much appreciated by the guests and their entertainers [. . .] Mr. Rogers made a very happy speech in which he said that this, the third cat show held in Rochester, is in many ways the best. At none has greater care been exercised in the attention shown the cats, and their comfort, and to devise rules and classes for the cats that would please all interested.

The innovation in the matte of prizes has met with universal favour, in that no cash prize is offered. “The cat owner and lover does not send his cat to the show to see how much money he can make,” declared Mr. Rogers, “but purely through his interest in cats, and his pride in pets.”

Next year Mr. Rogers said he wishes to promote an international cat show to be given by the cat fanciers all over the country, at some central point, either in Rochester or Buffalo, so that cats from the East and from the West will have equal opportunity to compete. This he would make an exclusive ribbon show, and run by Eastern and Western clubs, so that all will be equally represented in the management. Judges, he said, should be at least three in each class, and if thought best a judge should be brought from Europe. Mr Roger’s remarks along this line were received with enthusiasm.

He took occasion to speak very highly of the work done by Miss Wetmore in behalf of the Lockehaven Cat Club, and of Mrs. Armstrong’s ability and efforts to make the enterprise a success.

[. . .] One cat was also sold by Mrs. Charles Smith to Mrs. F.L. Hughes, a kitten, “Tiger Lily,” for $12. The happiest and proudest person at the show yesterday was little Julia Balo, of No. 6 Woodford street, a pupil of No. 8 school, whose cat “Peter,” a beautiful tiger, won the first prize in the special class for school children. Julia received a Kodak and a beautiful blue ribbon, and the cat was the admired of all admirers.

The awards on the cats were not completed until a late hour last evening, so it was impossible to get them out in time for the press.

1904 ROCHESTER CAT SHOW

CAT SHOW IN JANUARY – Democrat and Chronicle, 15th October, 1903
The Lockehaven Cat Club is going to have a cat show in January, according to a decision reached at the annual meeting held yesterday afternoon at the home of Mrs. Alfred Jackson, No. 143, Meigs street. Many things of interest, to cat lovers were discussed and preliminary plans wore laid for putting the coming show on a larger scale than any previously held. From the fact that the exhibitors from all over the country were so well pleased with last year’s exhibition it is beyond question that the entry list will be doubled in January. Rochester is so admirably situated as to be a central point between the Eastern and Western clubs, and the local club is assured that its exhibition will attract the entry of the best cats in America. The following officers were elected yesterday: President, Mrs. Alfred Jackson; vice president, Dr. Emil Knight; secretary, Miss G.R. Lawrence; treasurer, Mrs. Richard Gardiner.

CAT FANCIERS MAY HOLD SHOW – Democrat and Chronicle, 10th January, 1904
Whether or not there will be a cat show in Rochester this season is a question. Several members of the Rochester Cat Club are anxious to hold one, but they realize from past experience the amount of work that accompanies such an exhibition. This city is the headquarters of the Lockhaven Cat Club, members of which are scattered throughout the country from the Atlantic coast to Chicago. Its president is Mrs. Alfred Jackson, of Meigs street, Dr. Emil Knight is vice- president, and Miss Edith Lawrence, secretary.

The Rochester members suggest that some organization of a charitable nature combine with them in carrying on a show, as they would cheerfully share the profits if they could divide the work. As far as high breed cats are concerned, the Flower City has its share. In various homes there are felines of an ancestry that reaches back so far that their aristocracy is beyond doubt. The pretty creatures also bear evidences of this, for, as the old saying goes, “blood will tell.” Various letters of inquiry have been received asking If Rochester will not have another cat show, as outsiders wish to participate.

MEETING OF CAT LOVERS – Democrat and Chronicle, 19th January, 1904
All cat lovers in Rochester are invited to attend a meeting of the Lockhaven Cat Club, which will be held at the home of Mrs. Alfred Jackson, No. 143 Meigs street, this afternoon, at 2:30 o'clock. At this time it will probably be determined whether or not it will be advisable to hold a cat show. If a sufficient enthusiasm is manifested and adequate pledges of support are received at this afternoon's meeting, such a show will probably be held.

CAT FANCIERS MEET – Democrat and Chronicle, 20th January, 1904
The Lockhaven Cat Club held a meeting yesterday afternoon at the residence of its president, Mrs. Alfred Jackson, No 143 Meigs street. The principal decision reached, was that of making an effort to have Mrs. Jackson appointed as one of the committee of three to serve on the management of the cat exhibit at the Louisiana Purchase Exposition at St. Louis. In order to accomplish this, the club will use its influence with Hon. F. D. Colburn, general manager of livestock for the fair. The appointment will be considered an honor by those interested in high bred cats, the raising of which is coming more and more into vogue.

In the event of Mrs. Jackson's appointment, the presence of her name upon the committee would give enviable fame to the Lockhaven Club, four officers of which live in Rochester. They were all at the meeting yesterday, and include Dr. Emil Knight, vice-president; Miss Grace R. Lawrence, secretary; Mrs. Charles Mann, treasurer. The reports of the last two showed the prospects of the club to be encouraging. The Lockhaven Club is believed to be the largest In the United States. The club also adopted resolutions to be sent to Manager Colburn. In substance they expressed the desire that cat fanciers in America and in foreign countries lend their hearty co-operation and sympathy to the exhibit at the St. Louis fair, to the end that the display might be worthy of the occasion.

There is now some prospect of Rochester having a cat show this winter. If one is held, Dr. Knight will doubtless be the manager. As the Lockhaven members are scattered over a large part of the country, cats would be shown from Chicago, New York, and many other cities. It would probably be held about the last week in February. There is a prospect that the club will combine with some philanthropic organization, dividing the proceeds and responsibility. The club decided to charge only the initiation fee of $1 to new members from now until after the show. It has been the custom to charge both this fee and also a yearly tax of $1, but the latter will at this time be omitted. The society desires all interested in cats to join, whether they own one or not.

LOCKHAVEN CAT CLUB – 26th January, 1904
A special meeting of the Lockhaven Cat Club, to which all cat lovers, regardless of affiliation with the club, are cordially invited, will be hold at the home of Miss Elizabeth C. Perrin, No. 103 St. Paul street, at 12 o’clock noon to-day. At this meeting further plans will be decided upon for the cat show to be held under the auspices of the club in Fitzhugh hall, February 24-26th. Mrs. Alfred Jackson, who was last week indorsed by The Lockhaven Club as one of the three delegates to the World’s Fair, yesterday received the information that the Beresford Cat Club, of Chicago, has also indorsed her, together with Dr. C. D. White, of Chicago, and a Mr. Chapman, of Romeo, Mich.

FOR THE CAT SHOW – Democrat and Chronicle, 30th January, 1904
Miss Grace R. Lawrence, secretary of the Lockhaven Cat Club, desires that all wishing to enter cats for the show which will probably be held the last of February, to notify her at once, stating the number of cuts they wish to exhibit. She will be at her home, No. 1025 Troup street, from 10 to 11 o’clock In the morning and from 1 to 2:30 o'clock every afternoon excepting Wednesdays and Saturdays. She may be reached over the Rochester telephone. No. 4049.

ABDUCTION OF SAM - Democrat and Chronicle, 2nd February, 1904
The near approach of the annual cat show in Rochester has caused would-be exhibitors to cast about for specimens of the feline tribe with which to capture the coveted blue ribbon. “All’s fair at cat shows, as well as in love and war,” seems to be the motto that at least one of the fair sex has adopted at this time, and her tactics have brought mourning to the household of W.H. Mooers, of No. 65 Emerson street.

On Sunday afternoon “Sam,” a silver tabby who had taken prizes at cat shows in former years, was skylarking on the pavement in front of the residence, when a well dressed female approached, picked up the tabby and commenced to fondle it. Sam is partial to ladies, and enjoyed the caresses; but while lavishing her endearments on the cat, the female did not cease to continue her rapid walk, and soon arrived at the corner, where she took the Sophia street car bound for the city, with Sam still in her arms. Mr. Mooers saw the woman pick Sam up, but did not just at that moment recognize the animal. When the fact that Sam had been forcibly abducted dawned on his perception, he said things which, if overheard by the fair abductress, would have caused her ears to tingle.

Sam’s milk saucer (which is hand painted china, by the way) is neglected, and his snug nest in the boudoir of his mistress is unoccupied, and there is deep gloom in the house, which will only be dispelled by Sam’s return. If the lady, who so cruelly and wantonly separated Sam from his owners, will return the animal before the cat show opens, all will be forgiven. If not, then there may be trouble in store for pussy’s abductress, as she is known.

CAT CLUB TO MEET – Democrat and Chronicle, 7th February, 1904.
Mrs. Alfred Jackson, president of the Lockhaven Cat Club, is desirous that all members be present at a meeting to be held to-morrow morning in the supervisors’ committee room of the Court House at 11 o’clock. The meeting will be important as further arrangements will be made for the prospective cat show. The place for holding the exhibit has not yet been decided upon.

If the show is held there will be some very fine specimens of the feline race displayed, as a number have already been promised. Within the past few days Mrs. Jackson has received two silver tabby kittens from the famous kennel at Sandusky, O. These were the kittens of Queen Irene, the finest silver tabby in the United States, who is the daughter of Rob Roy, the English prize winner of Avondale, England. The kittens’ father is Sir Henry Irving, of Chicago fame. The little creatures arrived during the recent blizzard, after a journey that occupied twenty-eight hours instead of twelve, in which time the trip is usually made. They will surely be entered if Rochester has a cat show and they survive the winter.

Mrs. Elizabeth C. Perrin, of St. Paul street, has recently imported three French tortoise-shell Angoras that have amber eyes. They have historical names, Napoleon, Eugene and Napoleon II. Other beauties who will contest for honors are Mrs. Perrin's Roger, a Chinchilla, and a number of his offspring. Emerald is one, and she has a noble ancestry, being the daughter of the famous Green Eyed Monster and grand-daughter of Lord Southampton.

NO PLAN FOR CAT SHOW – Democrat and Chronicle, 9th February, 1904
At the meeting of the Lockhaven Cat Club, held yesterday in the supervisors’ committee room in the Court House, a committee was appointed to make arrangements for the proposed cat show. The members of the committee are: Dr. Emil Knight, chairman; Mrs. Andrew Ludolph and Mrs. Charles P. Mann. While It has been decided to hold the show, the place and time have not been determined. Many matters have come up which command careful consideration. It is probable that a meeting of the owners of the club will be held this afternoon for further consultation.

CAT SHOW CALLED OFF ON ACCOUNT OF THE COLD – Democrat and Chronicle, 18th February, 1904
Several Prize Winners Exhibited in Madison Square Garden Contract Pneumonia and Die — Show Next Fall.

[Note: it is more likely that the cats contracted a viral infection at the show]

There will be no cat show in Rochester this winter. The Lockhaven Cat Club reached this decision after learning of the high mortality among the thoroughbreds exhibited last month at the cat show in Madison Square Garden, New York. The number of deaths directly traceable to cold supports the claim of those fanciers who hold that high-bred cats cannot withstand the exposure incidental to long journeys. But the Lockhaven club has by no means given up the idea of promoting a show. It plans to hold a large one next November. It is expected that a large territory extending from the Atlantic coast to the Far West will be represented in the finest specimens of feline blood the country has produced.

The number of cats that died as a result of exposure at the Madison Square Garden exhibition was large. There were twenty-seven deaths, nearly every one from pneumonia. Among the victims was the famous Sir Thomas Upton, owned by Mrs. Gotwaltz. Sir Robert, a handsome prize winner belonging to Dr. Ottolengui, is seriously ill. Others who lost valuable pets are Mrs. Groff, from whom the epidemic took seven; Mrs. Estelle Ward, of Brooklyn, who was deprived of five; Mrs. Brian Brown, three, and Mrs. Hofstra, whose five Siamese cats all succumbed. Nearly all of these animals were in the cat show held in Rochester a year ago.

It is believed that the Lockhaven members who live in Rochester will have all the better show by waiting until next fall, at the same time avoiding the risk of bringing an untimely death upon valued pets. When the exhibit does take place many of the cats will come hundreds of miles, as the most noted ones are owned in Eastern cities or in Western towns. The club has purchased a challenge cup and several specials have been donated for the cat exhibition to be held at the St. Louis Fair.

>WILL PLAN FOR CAT SHOW - Democrat and Chronicle, 7th June 1904
An important meeting of the Lockhaven Cat Club will be held to-day at 3 P.M., at the home of the president, Mrs. Alfred Jackson, No. 143 Meigs street. Members are urged to be present, as plans will be discussed for the cat show which the club will conduct in November. All persons interested in cats are invited to attend the meeting.

PLANNING FALL CAT SHOW - Democrat and Chronicle, 8th June 1904
The Lockhaven Cat Club met yesterday at the home of the president, Mrs. Alfred Jackson, in Meigs street. Arrangements for the cat show in November were discussed. The members feel confident that they will be able to hold a show that will rank among the finest ever conducted in the country.

Mrs. Jackson will visit the St. Louls fair during the cat exhibition. She expects to meet there cat fanciers from both sides of the water, and will improve the opportunity to obtain entries for the Rochester show.

The Rochester members are talking of holding a card party this month to raise funds for the exhibition. As much work must be done before the show takes place, the club requests all cat lovers in the city to join in the preparations.

ENTRIES FOR CAT SHOW – Democrat and Chronicle, 8th September, 1904
Rochester numbers of the Lockhaven Cat Club who attended the Royal Cat Club show in Toronto have returned. Mrs. Jackson, president of the Lockhaven Club, entered her Edward VII, a beautiful brown tabby, the daughter of Queen Irene, and Neptune, a brown tabby kitten. Edward received honourable mention. Neptune took first prize. He is the son of Chub, also owned by Mrs. Jackson.

While In Toronto Mrs. Jackson arranged for important entries for the Lockhaven Club show to be held in Rochester November 17th to l9th. Valuable cats owned In Chicago, Detroit, Cleveland and other cities are promised. Prominent fanciers whom Mrs. Jackson met were interested in the exhibit and some will doubtless attend. Rochester members feel confident that they will be able to procure many prize winners from the East and Middle West. Mrs. Jackson says that the Royal Club is especially strong in brown tabbies, but not in any other variety.

PLANS FOR CAT SHOW - Democrat and Chronicle, 22nd September, 1904
“We can promise Rochester the best cat show it has ever witnessed," said Mrs. Alfred Jackson, president of the Lockhaven Cat Club, last night. The club is preparing for the show, which will be held from November 17th to 19th. Mrs. Jackson has just returned from New York, where she saw Dr. Ottolengui, corresponding secretary for the Atlantic Cat Club, who promised the best show to be found in the United States. The entries made by his club will include a number of champion prize winners.

The best cats owned by Chicago fanciers are also engaged for the show. Entries are promised from Detroit, Cleveland and cities in all parts of the West. Cats from Canada will also be exhibited. The Atlantic Club will offer champion cups and several specials. All the fanciers whom Mrs. Jackson has met are interested in the Rochester show.

Members of the Lockhaven Club wish that persons in the city and surrounding towns, who have cats to enter, would write to the secretary. Miss Grace R. Lawrence. They will receive personal replies. The club is also desirous that persons interested should offer prizes for the show.

IMPORTANT MEETING OF CAT CLUB - Democrat and Chronicle, 29th September, 1904
The Lockhaven Cat Club will meet tomorrow afternoon at 2:30 o'clock at the home of the president, Mrs. Alfred Jackson, No. 143 Meigs street. Owing to the fact that the secretary, Miss Grace R. Lawrence, is out of the city, the members will not be notified by card. A large attendance is urged as arrangements will be discussed and committees appointed for the cat show in November. All persons interested in the show are invited to attend the meeting.

CAT FROM WHITE HOUSE - Democrat and Chronicle, 1st October, 1904

Important plans for the cat show in November were discussed at a meeting of the Lockhaven Cat Club yesterday afternoon at the home of the president, Mrs. Alfred Jackson, at No. 143 Meigs street. In addition to the many high-bred pets that have been promised from various parts of the United States and Canada, it is possible that the show will have as an attraction a cat from the White House. Mrs. Jackson will write to Miss Alice Roosevelt asking her to exhibit the handsome cat recently presented to her. All the proceeds of the show above a certain amount the club will donate to the Humane society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals for the purchase of an ambulance.

The Lockhaven Club invites all persons in neighboring towns who are interested in cats to join its membership. It also desires the hearty co-operation of city people in making the show a success. The club is getting out its premium list and catalogue and getting advertisements for the catalogue.

Among those at the meeting were the vice-president, Dr. Emil Knight, and the treasurer, Mrs. Charles Mann. Mrs. Mary S. Sage, lecturer for the Humane Society, was made a member of the club.

PREPARING FOR CAT SHOW – Democrat and Chronicle, 23rd October, 1904
The Lockehaven Cat Club is actively engaged in preparing for the cat show that is to be held in Fitzhugh Hall November 17th, 18th and 19th. The challenge cups of the Beresford and Atlantic Cat clubs are to be here, and more than fifty prizes will be awarded. It is expected that some of the best cats in this country and Canada will be exhibited. Equal attention will be given by the procurers of the show to long and short-haired cats.

The judges for the show are to be Mrs. Charles Hampton Lane, of Chicago; H.F. Vidal, of Grimsby. Ontario, and Dr. Emil Knight, of Rochester. The committees that have the show in charge are:

Show — Mrs. V. W. Armstrong, chairman; Mrs. Alfred Jackson, Mrs. J.C. Urquhart, Mrs. John Hampton Lane, Dr. Emil Knight, Mrs. Elizabeth L. Brace, Mrs. Charles Mann.
Reception — Mrs John Force, chairman; Mrs. J.J. Pippart, Mrs. Harry Love, Mrs. Andrew Ludolph, Mrs. J. T. Moshier, Mrs. Charles Partridge, Miss Elizabeth Perrin, Miss Grace Lawrence.
Food - Mrs. Andrew Ludolph, chairman; Mrs. W.H. Sage, Mrs. Alfred Jackson, Mrs. John Force, Miss Emma Perrin, Miss Katherine Klein, Miss Grace Lawrence.
Sales - Mrs. Oscar Pardo, chairman; Mrs. John Force, Mrs Alfred Jackson, Mrs. W.W. Armstrong. Mrs. W.D. Hayes.
Press - Miss Anderson, Miss Purcell.
Veterinarian — Emil Knight. V.M.D.

NEEDN’T HAVE PEDIGREES – Democrat and Chronicle, October 25, 1904
Plans for the exhibit to be given by the Lockehaven Cat Club in Fitzhugh Hall, November 17th, 18th and 19th, are progressing and some attractive offers in the way of prizes will be made. Although there will be many pedigreed animals in the exhibits, the club desires it to be known that there will be several special prizes for the more common house pets, whose hair is not so long and whose ancestry does not date so far into the remote past.

Prizes will be awarded to the best cat owned by a policeman, the best owned by a fireman and to the best office cat; also to the oldest and to the largest cat. Inducements will be offered also for school children to bring in their pets. This will be the twelfth grand championship exhibit of the club. Some of the finest felines from the Walnut Ridge Farm of Boston will be entered, with others that are sure to attract attention. The hall will be specially arranged for the exhibition. Birds and goldfish will be shown.

LOCKEHAVEN CAT CLUB - Democrat and Chronicle, November 9th, 1904
Enter your cats now and secure free ticket of admission, good every day of the monster championship Cat Show at Fitzhugh Hall, November 17th to 19th. Over 250 cash prizes, 500 handsome ribbons and special prizes. Special school children’s class for handsomest and homeliest cat. Entry fe 50 cents with free season ticket. Entries close Saturday, November 12th. For information and entry blanks, call on Mrs. E.L. Brace, No. 56 North street, Rochester 920, Bell 3640 Chase.

ENTRIES WANTED FOR CAT SHOW – Democrat and Chronicle, 13th November, 1904
The Lockhaven Cat Club desires that all persons having pet cats shall enter them for the cat show that is to open Thursday in Fitzhugh Hall. It is not necessary that a cat be of uncommon variety or that it have a pedigree. Prizes will be awarded for ordinary cats of all kinds. The prizes are displayed in the window of the Jackson book store, No. 14 State street. The club especially urges entries, because it wishes to have an exhibition that will do it justice In the estimation of other clubs in the country. Many of these will be represented at the show.

CITY HAS VALUABLE CATS - Democrat and Chronicle, 15th November, 1904
Some of the most valuable cats that will be on exhibition at the cat show in Fitzhugh Hall, Thursday, Friday and Saturday are owned by Rochester people. The Misses Perrin, of St. Paul street, will enter eight long haired cats, nearly all having pedigrees. Two, Roger and Emerald, are worth $1,000 each. The others are French cats.

Mrs. Alfred Jackson, president of the Lockehaven Club, will enter eight cats, including Chubb, Lady Floss, Cupid, Phyrne and Silver Bubbles. Mrs. J. C. Urquhart will enter five for competition and a mother and five kittens for exhibition. Mrs. W. W. Brace will enter Bill, a handsome brown and white. Mrs. Oscar Pardo and Mrs. S. J Smith will show orange cats.

Among those who will exhibit short-haired cats are Miss Grace R. Lawrence, Mrs. George Bragdon and Miss Elizabeth Pryor.
Edward C. Weeks, of Palmyra, will exhibit a trick cat that will perform every afternoon and evening. The cat performs on the trapeze and does other remarkable things. Mrs. F. C. Whitney, of this city, will show Ginger, a yellow trick cat.

The president of the club said last night that there were still twenty-five empty cages for the show and that entries would be received at No. 50 North street until Thursday. The show opens on that morning at 10 o’clock, up to which hour entries may be made.

TABBY AND TOM ON EXHIBITION - Democrat and Chronicle, 17th November, 1904
Cat Club have great expectations for the cat show that will open this forenoon at 10 o'clock in Fitzhugh Hall and continue through Saturday. They say this will be the cat show of all cat shows in the United States. High-bred cats with long pedigrees have been arriving hourly for days. Prize winners are here from Michigan, Chicago, Toronto, Boston, New York and many other places. Among them are champions that never have been second and don't know that the “also-ran” class exists. Rochester cat fanciers can boast of some of the finest specimens in the country. These will doubtless be adorned with their share of ribbons before the show closes.

Fine cages have been made for the exhibition. They have double screens, the outer one securing the cage door, the inner one having a space for food to be placed within. The cats behave remarkably well; much better, it is said, than dogs do under the same circumstances. Some of them seemed restless yesterday, but they seldom mewed.

Mrs. O'Toole, of Adrian, Mich., has brought a valuable family of cats. They are stopping at the Powers Hotel, where they were last night having a frolic on one of the balconies. One of the cats, Gay Lord Quex, cost his owner $300. He is a son of Arlington Hercules, who carried first prizes everywhere for being the finest brown tabby, until last year, when he was beaten by Lord Quex. As there are some remarkable brown tabbies in Rochester, Quex’s fate at this show will be awaited with interest. He has never been beaten. Mrs. O’Toole also has with her Princess Victoria and Chiffon. All three are Persian cats.

Dr. R. Otto Langue [Ottolengui], of New York, also arrived yesterday. He exhibits two blue Persian cats and two black ones. One of them is Osiris, a monster blue cat. The others are Lady Lola, Sir Robert and Dolly Dutton.

Near the hall entrance are four cats that arrived yesterday from Canada. Mrs. W.J.O. Malloch, or Toronto, owns three of them and came with her pets. Two are orange Persians, Sam and Yeto. They are half-brothers, sons of Furgo, who won a silver cup for being the best cat bred and owned in Canada. Mrs. Malloch’s other cat, Rex, has short hair. His ancestry is unknown, but he has taken six prizes, three firsts and three specials. Rex is a finely formed gray tabby and is almost faultlessly marked.

Another cat from the Dominion is Bijou, a pure white Persian with golden brown eyes. She is a dainty creature exquisitely neat. She greets visitors good naturedly, but evidently does not like solitary confinement, as she presses against the wires of her cage much of the time. Bijou is owned by Miss S.A. Cox, of Toronto.

Judge Togo, owned by C. William Wurster, of Ithaca, was among the out-of-town cats that arrived yesterday. Miss Grace R. Lawrence, of Rochester, will show Romeo, a short-haired silver tabby. He has won five prizes, four of them for being the best short-haired cat in Rochester. Romeo is reputed to be very wise.

Titus, son of the celebrated Ben Hut, of Boston, will be one of the ten cats exhibited by Mrs. J.C. Urquhart. He is valued at $50. He is a finely formed black and white Persian cat.

Mrs. Andrew Ludolph is to exhibit Beauty, a short-haired black and white cat. Beauty has taken first prizes at all three of the shows held in this city. Mrs. Ludolph will also show Keekee.

Other famous Rochester cats, previously mentioned in announcements of the show, will be show by Mrs. Alfred Jackson, president of the Lockhaven club, who owns some of the finest in America, and the Misses Perrin, who will exhibit nine, including the French cats valued at $1,000 each.

Fitzhugh Hall has never looked so attractive upon the occasion of an animal show as it does today. Every side of the hall is decorated with draperies in the national colors. Women of the club will be in the hall much of the time to receive visitors. Members of the Lockhaven club wish it understood that entries may be made up to 10 o’clock this morning. The price of admittance to the hall at 25 and 15 cents.

PRIZES AWARDED AT THE CAT SHOW. MRS. A. JACKSON’S CATS WIN THE MOST. NEVER WAS A BETTER SHOW. – Democrat and Chronicle, 19th November 1904
There were many proud persons in the crowd that walked away from the cat show in Fitzhugh Hall last night, because their pets were wearing ribbons awarded by the judges. There was an opportunity for almost everyone who made an entry to take some sort of prize, about 200 being offered. Few decisions hd been made by the judges until afternoon, and they did not finish their work until nearly 11 o’clock at night. Long-haired cats, short-haired cats, those having pedigrees and those having none all came in for honors.

“I have attended many cat shows,” said C.H. Jones, last evening, “three or four in Chicago and as many in New York, but I never saw a better lot of cats exhibited than those shown here.” Mr. Jones is the editor of the Cat Journal.

The cats looked as if they felt their importance. They must know by this time that they are not ordinary cats, after listening for two days to the comments made by admiring visitors that pass their cages. They are surfeited with compliments. Those that travel over the country from one show to another, winning prizes, have doubtless, like artists of the stage, come to live on the applause of the public.

A case near the entrance to the hall contains five silver loving cups and numerous other attractive articles that will be awarded as prizes.

Beautiful pieces of burnt woodwork and decorated china are arranged in a pink booth on the north side of the hall. The woodwork is the work of Mrs. Luitwieler; the china of Miss Minnie Pauckne. The proceeds from the pieces that are sold will go to the Lockehaven Club. Prizes have been awarded as follows:

Neuter cats – Long-haired, Gampo Van Slyke,. Mrs. O.E Van Slyke, Rochester, first.
Short-haired, Romeo, Miss Grace Lawrence, first; Zenda, Mrs. George C. Bragdon, second; Christmas, Ernest Hart, third.

School children’s cats – Peter, Miss Julia Bale, first; Muff, Raymond Brown, second.

Specials –
Best short-haired female cat, Roly Poly, Mrs. Mary S. Sage.
Best long-haired neuter, Gampo Van Slyke,. Mrs. O.E Van Slyke.
Oldest cat in show, Romeo Bowden, Mrs. H.J. Bowden, Rochester.
Female cat with best eyes, Nita, Mrs. Luella Hodges.
Best marked long-haired cat, Napoleon II, the Misses Perrin.
Best long-haired kitten owned by a resident of Rochester, Golden Glow, Mrs. Oscar Pardo.
Largest cat in the show, owned by a resident of Rochester, Babe, Miss Katherine Klein.
Best short-haired female cat, Beauty, Mrs. Andrew Ludolph.
Best pair of brown tabby kittens, Inquisitive and Mouchette, George E. Rowland.
Best short-haired neuter, Rex, Mrs. W.J.O. Mallock, of Toronto.
Best long-haired tortoise-shell female, Nannette, Miss Lucy C. Johnstone.
Best long-haired silver kitten, Wolverine, Mrs. O’Toole, Adrian, mich.
Best long-haired tortoise-shell male, Dinah, Dr. J.C. Urquhart.
Best Siamese cat, Madison Calif, Miss Lucy C. Johnstone, Chicago.
Best blue Angora female, Lady Lola, Mrs. R.O. Lengui [R. Ottolengui], New York.
Best blue and white Angora male kitten, Sir Mortimer, Mrs. R.M. Pietz.
Best Short-haired cat owned by boy or girl under 14 years of age, Det. George Cooper.
Best pair of black long-haired cats, Sir Robert and Dollo [sic] Dutton, Mrs. R.O. Lengui [R. Ottolengui], New York.
Best printing office cat, Peter II, Mrs. Charles Mann.
Best short-haired neuter, Peter II, Mrs. Charles Mann.
Best cat or kitten sired by Prince Chubb and visiting queen, Jupiter, Mrs. Jane Smith, Detroit.
Best short-haired black cat, Nig, Mrs. James Watts.
Best long-haired cat, Nig, Mrs. James Watts [must be an error – Nig winning a short-haired and a long-haired class]
Best silver female kitten, Silver Bubbles, Mrs. A.S. Jackson.
Best long-haired cat from Canada, Albert Edward, Dr. J.S. Niven.
Best blue-eyed white female cat, Anita Wells, Miss Helen V.R. Wells.
Best solid short-haired cat, Billy Boy, Miss Maud H. Lamb.
Best female cat in show, Bitterne Chiffon, Mrs. James Conlisk.
Best brace of kittens, Alice A and Augusta A, Dr. J.S. Niven.
Best brown tabby, short-haired male, Billy Boy, Miss Maud H. Lamb. [Billy Boy won both a solid and a tabby class, so “solid” must mean “without white” in this case]
Best female brown tabby, Lady Bee, Mrs. W.R. Stone.
Best kitten of any color, Dot, George Cooper.
Best neuter, Romeo, Miss Grace R. Lawrence.
Best short-haired kitten, Dot, George Cooper.
Best white male, Bijou, Miss Cox.
Best short-haired neuter, any tabby with white, miss Grace Lawrence.
Best office cat, Peter II, Mrs. Charles Mann.
Best long-haired brown tabby, Chiffon, Mrs. E.W. O’Toole.
Best coated long-haired male, Wolverine, Mrs. E.W. Chapman, Romeo, Mich.
Best short-haired male, Madison Calif, Miss Lucy C. Johnstone, Chicago.
Best cat with kittens, Phroso, Mrs. J.C. Urquhart.
Best long-haired male, Titus, Mrs. J.C. Urquhart.
White male with blue eyes, Honorable Peter Sterling, C.H. Jones, Palmyra, first.
White female with blue eyes, Anita Wells, Miss Helen Van Rensselaer Wells, Palmyra, second.
White male with golden eyes, Bijou, Miss S. Cox, Toronto, first.
White female, golden eyes, Miss Bob White, Mrs Alma J. Wright, Phelps, N.Y.; Dorothy V. Wells, Mrs. Blanche D. Wells, Palmyra, third.
Black males, Saratoga Sir Robert, Mrs. R.O. Lengui [R. Ottolengui], New York, first; Paul Dunbar, Mrs. Edith Sears, South Haven, Mich., second; Prince Chubb, Mrs. A.S. Jackson, Rochester, third.
Black females, Saratoga Dolly Dutton, Mrs. R.O. Lengui [R. Ottolengui], New York, first.
Blue male, Osiris, Mrs. R.O. Lengui [R. Ottolengui], first; Albert Edward, Dr. J.S. Niven, London, Ont., second.
Blue female, Princess Victoria, Mrs. E.W. O’Toole, Adrian, Mich., first; Lady Lola, Mrs. R. Ottolengui, second; Queen Alexandra, Dr. J.S. Niven, third.
Silver males, Roger, Miss Elizabeth Perrin, Rochester, first; Sontag, Mrs. James Conlisk, Gowanda, N.Y., second; T.J.. Mrs. James Conlisk, third.
Silver female, Nita, Mrs. Luella Hodges, Pittsburg, first; Sweet Marie, Mrs. James Conlisk, second.
Shaded silver female, Roma, Mrs. Luella Hodges, first.
Silver tabby, male, Onyx of Gladdisfenn, Mrs. L.A. Woodward, Chicago, first.
Silver tabby, female, Argent Puff Ball, Mrs. L.A. Woodward, first; Sweetheart 2d, Mrs. George E. Rowland, Jersey City, second.
Brown or gray tabby, male, Sweet Caporal, Mrs. C.H. Jones, Palmyra, first; Gay Lord Quex, Mrs. E.W. O’Toole, Adrian, Mich., second; Califf, Mrs. A.H. Dickinson, Buffalo, third.
Brown or gray tabby, female, Chiffon, Mrs. E.W. O’Toole, first.
Tortoiseshell and white, male or female, Madison Nannette, Miss Lucy C. Johnstone, Chicago, first; C.H. Jones, Palmyra, second; La Tosca, Mrs Blanch D. Wells, third.
Any other color, male or female, Little Pal, Mrs. Luella Hodges, first; Titus, Mrs. J.C. Urquhart, Rochester, second; Bobolink, Mrs. I.R. Owen, Ithaca, third.
Black male, Othello, Mrs. Ellen C. Harrig, Rochester, first; Cupid, Mrs. Alfred Jackson, Rochester, second.
Black female, Lady Floss, Mrs. Alfred S. Jackson, first; Psyche, Mrs. Richard L. Gardiner, Rochester, second.
Orange male, Judge, C. William Wurnster, Ithaca, first.
Silver female, Silver Bubbles, Mrs. Alfred Jackson, first.
Brown or gray tabby, female, Queen Dido, Mrs. S. Jane Smith, Rochester, first; Bobolink, Mrs. A.S. Jackson, second; Pansy, Dr. J.C. Urquhart, third.
Any color tabby with white, male or female, Phroso, Mrs. Dr. J.C. Urquhart, first; Napoleon II, Miss Elizabeth Perrin, second.
Any other color, male or female, Priscilla, Mrs. Amy Baker, Ionia, N.Y., first; Coburn Wells. Miss Blanche D. Wells, second; Dinah, Dr. J.C. Urquhart, third.

Open class for short-haired cats:
White female, Trilby, Mrs. John Schlitzer, Rochester, second.
Blue female, Roly Poly, Mrs. Mary S. Sage, Rochester, first; Roxane, Mrs. M.W. Searl, Rochester, second.
Brown or gray tabby, male, Billy Boy, Mrs. Maud H. Lamb, Rochester, first; Dandy, Mrs. J.B. Smith, Rochester, second.
Silver tabby, male, San, W.H. Mooers, Rochester, first.
Any color tabby with white, male or female, Jack, Mrs. Annie Benfield, Rochester, first; Kew Kew, J. George Cramer, Rochester, second; Lady Bee, Mrs. W.H. Stone, Rochester, third.

Foreign Cats:
Siamese male, Madison Calif, Miss Lucy C. Johnstone, first.
Black male, Nig, Mrs. James Watts, Rochester, first.
Chuckle Head, W. Bly, Pittsford, N.Y., first. [doesn’t mention breed]
Any color cat with or without white, male or female, Toto, Miss M.E. Macpherson, Rochester, first; henry Tinklepaw, Mrs. J.F. Connor, Rochester, second; Topsy Loos, M. Camilla Loose, Rochester.

FELINES LEAVE FITZHUGH HALL. ANNUAL CAT SHOW IS NOW A THING OF THE PAST. SUCCESS IN ALL RESPECTS. – Democrat and Chronicle, 20th November, 1904
The fourth annual show of the Lockehaven Cat Club is over, and with the exception of a few lonesome felines whose owners were unable to remove them from Fitzhugh Hall last night. For three days the people of the Flower city and surrounding country have had the pleasure of viewing the pets. The show was successful in every respect, and much credit is due the officers of the club and members of the committees, who worked hard to make the event the best of its kind in the history of the organization. The decisions of the judges, Mrs. Charles Hampton Lane and H. F. Vidal, gave satisfaction.

The exhibitors numbered between seventy-five and 100, and the exhibited would total nearly 200 were they counted. Interest yesterday centered in the specials, which were awarded in number. The crowd that filled the hall from the time the doors were opened until closing time was the largest of the exhibition.

A Rochester man entered the box office last night and in a voice that plainly showed excitement asked his wife if she had seen Peggy. “No,” was the answer, “she was in her cage three minutes ago.” Then began a hunt for the missing cat. Suddenly one who had joined in the search exclaimed: “Wait a minute. I’ll bet I know where she is.” Going to one of the crates she was about to ship out of town, the woman pulled out the missing feline. She had taken the Rochester cat for her own, and did not discover the mistake until passing the cage in which her cat had been on exhibition, she noticed that her pet was still in its place.

Another exciting chase occurred when a large tabby escaped from its cage and made for an open door. The doorman headed the animal off and she started for a stairway. Again her path was blocked. Then she ran under the cages and was surrounded by six or seven women with widespread skirts, each calling to it in endearing terms. The cat made a sudden spring and they scattered. After about ten minutes it jumped into the cage from which it had escaped.

The special awards made yesterday follow:
Best blue eyed white male, The Honorable Peter Sterling, Mrs. Blanche D. Wells Palmyra.
Best black male, Saratoga Sir Robert, Mrs R. Ottolengui, New York.
Best silver or silver tabby male, Roger, Miss Elizabeth Perrin, city.
Best brown tabby male, Sweet Caporal, C. H. Jones, Palmyra.
Best cream male, Madison Major Independence, Miss Lucy C. Johnstone, Chicago.
Beresford Cat Club medal for best silver female belonging to member of B.C.C. of A., Bitterne Chiffon, Mrs. James Conlisk, Gowanda. N. Y.
Beresford medal for best long haired black kitten, Black Hawk, George E. Rowland, Jersey City.
Best short-haired neuter, Romeo, Miss Grace R. Lawrence, city.
Best long haired orange tabby, Woolverine, Mrs. W. M Chapman, Romeo, Mich.
Best cream kitten, Edward VII., Mrs. W. W. Brace, city.
Best white female with blue eyes, Anita Wells, Miss Helen Van Rensselaer Wells, Palmyra.
Best blue cat or kitten belonging to a member of the Black Cat Society of America, Saratoga Osiris, Mrs. R Ottolengui, New York.
Best long-haired white, Miss Bob White, Mrs. Alma J. Wright, Phelps, N. Y.
Best long-haired blue, Saratoga Osiris, Mrs. R. Ottolengui. New York.
Best long-haired silver, Roger, Miss Elizabeth Perrin, city.
Best long-haired marked silver, Little Pal, Mrs. Luella Hodges, Pittsburg.
Best longhaired brown tabby, Sweet Caporal, C. H. Jones, Palmyra.
Best long-haired silver tabby, Onyx of Gladdisfenn, Mrs. L. A. Woodward, Chicago.
Best long-haired stud, Saratoga Osiris, Mrs. R. Ottolengui, New York.
Best cat in the show, Saratoga Osiris, Mrs. R. Ottolengui, New York.
Best physician’s cat, Rex, Mrs. J. O. Malloch, Toronto.
Best short haired female cat, Roly Poly, Mrs. Mary S. Sage. city.
Best long-haired neuter, Gampo Van Slyke, Mrs. O. E. Van Slyke, city.
Oldest cat in the show, Romeo Bowden, Mrs. H. J. Bowden, city.
Largest number of cats, Mrs. Alfred Jackson. Rochester.
Female cat with best eyes, Nita, Mrs. Luella Hodges, Pittsburg.
Best marked long-haired cat, Phroso, Mrs. J. C. Urquhart, city.
Best long-haired kitten, Golden Glow, Mrs. Oscar Pardo, city.
Largest cat in the show, Babe, Miss Katherine Klein, city.
Individual exhibitor or cattery winning largest number of points, Mrs. Alfred Jackson. Rochester.
Best coated long-haired female cat, Madison Nanette, Miss Lucy C. Johnstone, Chicago.
Best short haired female cat, Beauty, Mrs. Andrew Ludolph, city.
Besr pair of brown tabby kittens, Inquisitive and Mouchette, George R. Rowland, Jersey City.
Best short-haired neuter, Rex, Mrs. W. J. O. Malloch, Toronto.
Best long-haired smoke female, Onyx of Gladdisfern, Mrs. L. A. Woodward, Chicago.
Best long haired tortoiseshell female, Madison Nanette, Miss Lucy C. Johnstone, Chicago.
Best longhaired silver cat from Canada, Albert Edward, Dr J. S. Niven, London, Ont.
Best marked long haired cat, Madison Nanette, Miss Lucy C. Johnstone, Chicago.
Cat coming from greatest distance, Madison Calif, Miss Lucy C. Johnstone, Chicago.
Best longhaired tortoiseshell male, Monsieur Beaucaire, Miss Elizabeth Perrin, city.
Best Siamese cat, Madison Calif, Miss Lucy C. Johnstone, Chicago.
Best blue Angora female, Saratoga Lady Lola, Mrs. R. Ottolengui, New York.
Best blue and white Angora male kitten, Sir Mortimer, Miss R. M Pietz, city.
Best short-haired cat, Dot, George Cooper, city.
Best pair of black long-haired cats Saratoga Sir Robert and Saratoga Dolly Dutton, Mrs. R. Ottolengui New York.
Best printing office cat, Peter II, Mrs. Charles Mann, city.
Best short-haired neuter, Peter II, Mrs. Charles Mann, city.
Best cat or kitten, sired by Prince Chub, Goldenrod, Mrs. Jane S. Smith, Rochester.
Best short haired black cat, Nig, Mrs. James Watts, city.
Best long-haired silver male, Roger, Miss Elizabeth Perrin, city.
Best coated short-haired cat (any class), Cupid, Mrs. Alfred Jackson, city.
Best silver female kitten owned by resident member Lockehaven Cat Club, Silver Bubbles, Mrs. Alfred Jackson, city.
Best blue-eyed white female cat from New York state, Anita Wells, Miss Helen Van Rensselaer Wells, Palmyra.
Best solid color short-haired cat owned by resident of Rochester, Billy Boy, Mrs. Maud Hollway Lamb, city.
Best female cat in show, Bitterne Chiffon, Mrs. James Conlisk, Gowanda, N. Y.
Best brace of kittens, Alice A. and Augusta A., Dr. J. S. Niven, London, Ont.
Best brown tabby short-haired male, Billy Boy, Mrs Maud Hollway Lamb, city
Best brown tabby female, Lady Bee, Mrs. W. R. Stone, city.
Best kitten, any color, Dot, George Cooper, city
Best neuter, Romeo, Miss Grace R. Lawrence, city.
Best short haired kitten, D>ot, George Cooper, city.
Best smoke, Sontag, Mrs. James Conlisk, Gowanda, N.Y.
Best white female, blue eyes (Anita Wells barred), Napoleon II, Miss Elizabeth Perrin city.
Best white male, Bijou, Miss C. Cox, Toronto.
Best short-haired neuter, Romeo, Miss Grace R. Lawrence, city.
Best office cat, short haired neuter, blue with white markings, belonging to member of Lockehaven Cat Club, Peter II., Mrs. Charles Mann, city.
Best long haired brown tabby, Chiffon, Mrs. E. W. O’Toole, Adrian, Mich.
Best coated long haired male, Woolverine, Mrs. W M. Chapman, Romeo, Mich.
Beat short haired male, Madison Calif, Miss Lucy C. Johnstone, Chicago.
Best blue cat, Saratoga Osiris, Mrs. R. Ottolengui, New York.
Best cat with kittens, Phroso, Mrs. J. C. Urquhart, city.
Best longhaired male, Titus, Mrs. J. C. Urquhart, city.

GINGER WON A PRIZE – Democrat and Chronicle, 21st November 1904
Through an oversight the name of Ginger, a cat owned by Mrs. F. C. Whitner, was omitted from the list of prize winners at the recent cat show in Fltzhugh Hall. Ginger took first prize in his class. He is a short-haired orange neuter cat with brown eyes. Though entered as a distinctly short-haired cat, the judges said he bore traces of Angora blood.

1905 ROCHESTER CAT SHOW

SPECIALS FOR THE CAT SHOW – Democrat and Chronicle, August 7, 1905
Mrs. Elizabeth L. Brace, of Greig street, who is secretary for the Lockehaven Cat Club, receives a large amount of mail relating to the show which the club is to hold in October. On Friday she received ten letters in which were many offers of specials. More than 150 specials have already been offered, besides prize money. As more than 400 cats have been promised, the local members believe they will have a fine exhibition. St. Cecilia, a silver chinchilla owned by Mrs. Alfred Jackson, president of the club, recently presented her consort, Prince Chub, with six kittens. St. Cecelia has a long pedigree.

COLONIAL HALL TO BE RENTED FOR CAT SHOW – Democrat and Chronicle, September 13, 1905
At a well-attended meeting of the Lockehaven Cat Club held yesterday, at the home of the secretary, Mrs. Elizabeth L. Brace, No. 42 Greig street, the coming show, which it is expected will be the largest ever held in this country, was the chief topic of discussion. It was decided to rent Colonial Hall. The show will open at noon November 14th and continue until the noon of the 17th. Cats famous on both sides of the ocean and cats with prize lists as long as their pedigrees will be on exhibition. Because of the large number expected the club will order 100 more cages than it had for last year's show.

Many cats are expected from Michigan and from Chicago. Mrs. William Chapman, of Romeo, Mich., will bring a string. One will be Wolverine, an orange that has never yet been beaten. Mrs. L. H. Bixby, of Chicago, proprietor of the Blue Coat Cattery, expects to enter some pets. Mrs. L. H Woodword, of that city, plans to show her Matthew of Durham, which she imported from England, where he was judged to be the finest cream in the country. He has won thirty first prizes. Mrs. Howard Alton, also of Chicago, expects to enter silver cats, of which she makes a specialty. Mrs. Dykehouse, of Grand Rapids, Mich , will bring eight or ten cats. Of these, none is more famous than Y Brenmin Gwyn, an imported white Persian. Mrs. Dykehouse is a member of the Lockehaven club. Mrs. Champion, owner of the largest Eastern cattery for silvers, who lives on Staten Island, will enter several cats. Dr R. Ottolengui, of New York, expects to show five or six. Miss Ava Pollard, of Elizabeth, N.J., a breeder of white Persians, will doubtless have a string on exhibition. A number of cats are expected from Canada

Miss Jane K Cathcart, of Oradell, N.J., the young woman with whom originated the idea of exterminating the tramp cat, will be at the exhibition and will show fifteen or twenty of her short haired pets. Miss Cathcart owns a cattery devoted exclusively to short haired cats and she has ordered an automobile built expressly to carry them from one show to another. It is expected that the car will be completed in time to bring the cats that will be shown in Rochester.

The club will have a tea room in Colonial Hall, for the accommodation of patrons. The fame of the Lockehaven Club is spreading far and wide. Not only is it the second largest cat club in America, but it is the first one to be incorporated. When the papers of its incorporation were filed in Albany recently Associated Press dispatches telling of this were sent as far West as Detroit.

CAT CLUB PLANS ANNUAL EXHIBIT. LOCKEHAVEN FANCIERS TO HAVE THREE DAYS' SHOW – Democrat and Chronicle, 11th October, 1905
When members of the Lockehaven Cat Club met yesterday afternoon at the home of the president, Mrs. Alfred Jackson, No. 143 Meigs street, they talked of preparations for the three days’ show to be held next month in Colonial Hall. It is expected that this exhibition will eclipse any ever witnessed in this part of the country. Letters offering prizes and specials are being constantly received by the secretary,
Mrs. Elizabeth L. Brace. The show will open at noon on the 14th and close at noon of the 17th. Champions of the cat world will be shown by fanciers scattered over a territory extending from the Atlantic coast to Michigan and a part of Canada. There will many valuable prizes.

A feature that will add to the social interest of the show will be a banquet to be held on the night of the 15th in the cafe of the Masonic Club. Dr, R. Ottolengui, of New York, will be toastmaster. The responses will be as follows: “Lockehaven Cat Club,” Mrs. Jackson; "The Waif," C.H. Jones, of Palmyra, editor of the Cat Journal; “Our Canadian Visitors,” Archie Burland, of Grimsby, Ont.; “The Cat Press,” Mrs. Oliver L. Dosch, of Dayton, O., editor of the Cat Review; “American Cat Association,” Mrs. Charles Hampton Lane of Chicago; “Long Haired Cat,” Miss Ethel Champion, of Staten Island; "Short-Haired Cat,” Miss Jane R. Cathcart, of Oradell, N.J., her toast to be read by Mrs. Mary S. Sage, of Rochester. The banquet will be attended by the members of the club and out of town visitors.

Five members to the club, already the second largest in America, were added yesterday. One is Madame Akabane, wife of the Japanese minister to Spain, who lives in Madrid. Madame Akabane has long taken a special interest, in cats and is a subscriber to the Cat Journal. The other new members were Mrs. Marion B. Moore, of West Trop, wife of a veterinary surgeon prominent in the East; Mrs. Dora B. Butts, of Albany; Mrs. Raiman Harris and Mrs. James G. Ardrey, of Rochester. Ella Wheeler Wilcox has been a member for some time. Mrs. Ardrey was made chairman of a committee to procure badges and ribbons.

Mrs. O’Toole, of Adrian. Mich., has offered a brown tabby, of which Gay Lord Quex and Bonnie are the parents, to be raffled off for the benefit of the club. An admission fee of ten cents will be charged for children. The club will not solicit advertisements for the catalogue, but will depend on the patronage of the public for money to defray expenses of the show. All patrons of the show will be mentioned in the catalogue and also their business, if they have one to be advertised. Children from the various orphan asylums will be admitted free to the show on certain mornings.

The recent death of Roger, the beautiful Persian Silver owned by the Misses Perrin, of St. Paul street, is a cause of regret among members of the club. Roger was valued at $1,000. He was the son of Tintagel and grandson of Lord Southampton. He had won many prizes. He had been shown in New York and in Chicago.

Rolly Polly, one of Mrs. Mary S. Sage's pets has received a medal from the Royal Canadian Cat Club for being the best solid colored short haired cat exhibited in the recent cat show in Toronto.

COMMITTEES FOR CAT SHOW – Democrat and Chronicle, October 18, 1905
About 150 Prizes and Specials Offered for Lockehaven Club Exhibition. The committees for the show to be held by the Lockehaven Cat Club, November 14th to 17th, in Colonial Hall are made up as follows:

Show Committee - Mrs. Alfred Jackson, chairman; Mrs. Andrew Ludolph, Mrs. Charles Mann, Mrs. Clarence Browning, Mrs, Elizabeth L. Brace, Mrs. Mary S. Sage, Mrs. W. W. Armstrong, Mrs. R. L Stoddani, Mrs J. C. Urguhart.

Reception - Mrs. Alfred Jackson, chairman; Mrs. William H. Stout, Mrs. M. W. Searl, Mrs, W. W. Armstrong, Mrs Charles Mann, Miss Elizabeth Perrin, Mrs. J.R. Lister, Mrs. James Ardrey, Miss Ida Louise Hayes.

Entertainment - Mrs, John Force, chairman; Mrs. Andrew Ludolph, Mrs. R.L. Stoddard.

Feeding - Mrs. W. R Stone, chairman; Mrs. Amy Baker, Mrs, Clarence J. Browning, Miss Katharine Klein, Mrs. H.H. Mosher, Mrs. James Watts, Mrs. William L. Petas, Mrs. William H. Banker.

Care of Cages - Mrs. Mary S. Sage, chairman; Mrs. R.L. Gardiner, Mrs. Charles Levis, Mrs. W. H. Mooers, Mrs. J. B Smith, Mrs. Harry Bowden, Miss Grace Lawrence, Mrs. Louis Groh.

Sales – Mrs. John C. Urquhart, chairman; Mrs L.B. Blackmer, Miss Louise Griswald, Mrs. H.H. Love, Mrs P.J. Luitwieler, Mrs. Peter Nell, Miss Emma Perrin, Mrs, S. J. Smith.

Catalogue - Miss Mary E. Hoyt, chairman; Miss Charlotte Clark, Miss Minnie Puckner, Miss Helen V Wells, Miss Olive Hogan,

Press - Mrs, Elisabeth L. Brace, chairman; Miss A. S. Anderson, Democrat ami Chronicle; Mr. E. A. Tusher, Union and Advertiser; Mr E. A Crochett, Post Express.

The judges are to be Mrs. Charles Hampton Lane, of Chicago; Mrs. Oliver L. Dosch, of Dayton, Ohio, and A.E Field-Marshall, of Beamsville, Ont.

About 150 prizes and specials have already been offered. Last night Mrs. Elizabeth L. brace, the secretary, received a letter from Mrs. H.G. Dykehouse, of Romeo, Mich., saying that she would offer a valuable silver cup for the best black female.

SPECIALS FOR THE CAT SHOW – Democrat and Chronicle, 2nd November, 1905
The Lockehaven Cat Club is constantly receiving offers of cups and specials to be awarded at the show to be held in Colonial Hall, November 14 to 17th. The offers already made include 151 specials and thirty four cups. Two gold lined souvenir spoons came yesterday from Mrs. M.H. Swift, of Chicago. The spoons will go for the best orange and white long haired cat and the best long-haired tortoiseshell. Three medals have been received from the Canadian National Exhibition Company.

When Mrs. Elizabeth L. Brace, secretary for the club, was in New York last week she took entries for twenty five cats owned by Miss Jane R. Cathcart, of Oradell, N.J., who conducts a cattery for short haired cats. Mrs. J. C Mitchelson of Tarrifville, Conn., has entered three cats. C.B. Baguley, of Chicago, will show Thomas Carter Harrison, said to be the best short-haired silver tabby in America. Thomas, it is understood, is looking forward to gaining his championship at the Rochester exhibit. An arrival at the show that will [cause] great excitement among the female beauties is Purity, owned by Miss Ava Pollard, of Elizabeth, N.J., and said to be the best longhaired white female in the world. Thirty or forty entries have been made by Rochester fanciers.

Mrs. Charles Mann has offered a prize for the best printing house cat at the show, as a memorial to Peter the II., who departed this life a few weeks ago, Peter was a prize--winner, having taken a valuable silver cup, and his death is a loss to the Lockehaven Club. It is expected that a printing house cat In Albany, William Togo, will be difficult to excel in the contest for this prize. William won first prize and three specials last winter at the show In Albany conducted by Mrs. Brace for a club of that city.

ROCHESTER CAT SHOW – Kansas Globe, 14th November, 1905
The annual exhibition of the Lockehaven Cat club opened in Colonial hall today and will continue until the end of the week. Several hundred aristocrats of the feline kingdom from Chicago, Toronto, New York, Buffalo and other cities are on display.

BEST CATS GET THEIR TROPHIES – Democrat and Chronicle, 17th November, 1905
Whatever suspense the owners of cats on exhibition at the show conducted by the Lockehaven Club in Colonial hall may have had concerning the fate of their pets in the judges’ estimation was dispelled yesterday afternon by the final de-cisions as to specials. It is acknowledged that, the judges have done their work with much care, spending hours before the cages in determining as to the relative merits of the occupants. They delayed their decisions for some time because of insufficient light, not as has been reported, because some of the cats were late in arriving. Mrs. Charles Hampton Lane, of Chicago; Mrs. Oliver L. Dosch, of Dayton O., and A. E. Field-Marshall, of Beamsville, Ont., awarded the prizes.

There is a glass case in the east end of the hall that looks as though it had been taken bodily from a jewelry store. In it is an elaborate showing of articles, most of them silver, which will be taken home to-morrow by the happy owners of winning pets. The loving cups are large and handsome enough to be the trophies for the victors in an important yacht race. Besides these are many smaller articles, such as silver spoons and bottles of perfume that will go to the winners of “specials.”

Scrambling in and out of soft lined baskets are two families of kitten» with their mother. The kittens are not entered, but they are in the show because their mothers are competing for prizes and had to bring the babies with them. The kittens show that they are not bothering their heads about prizes or tormented by the pangs of jealousy. They play about the cages »s though life were one long picnic. The cats are owned by Mrs. J.C. Urquhart. In one cage is Phroso. Besides the kittens with her she is the mother of three cats occupying cages opposite her, all of which have taken prizes this year. They were sold to Rochester fanciers when four months old, at last year’s show. Glancing across the aisle Phroso looks with motherly pride on her three successful sons.

A pretty short-haired black cat is Beauty, owned by Mrs. Andrew Ludolph. The cat wins first in her class always because of her perfect markings, which are four white feet and equally marked white cheeks. Another short haired winner is Dandy, owned by Mrs. J. B. Smith, of Windsor street. Dandy is a handsome brown tabby. Little Miss Camilla Loos, of Lyndhurst street, shows a beautiful brown tabby and white with stripes like seal skin, Topsy. One family of mother and three kittens, all pure white, is a pretty sight. Gill and her babies are owned by M. Lintz, Clinton avenue north. Mrs. Richard Hardy, of Pittsburg, exhibits Tamerlane, an orange tabby kitten that won first in the senior tabby class and second in the novice, Golden Rowan won second to Tamerlane.

One of the kittens entered by Miss Ava L. Pollard, of Elizabeth, N. J., has been sold for $75 to a Rochester woman. Miss Margaret Palmer, of Prince street, will receive the prize offered by the Lockehaven club to the little girl in Rochester who has taken care of the largest number of waifs in the past year. She has in that time found homes for ten wanderers. Persons who attend the show this morning will receive souvenirs of the exhibition in the form of pamphlets containing pictures of famous cats. The show will close at 12 o'clock this noon.

MANY CATS AND LONG PRIZE LIST PROMISED FOR LOCKCHAVEN SHOW NEXT WEEK. Democrat and Chronicle, 8th November, 1905
If results are in accordance with preparations, Lockehaven Cat club will next week hold one of the best exhibitions ever seen on the continent. It is said that this club is the only cat club in America that conducts exhibitions independent of other organisations. The Atlantic and the Beresford clubs, two of the largest, always hold their shows in connection with a poultry exhibition.

The show will be opened Tuesday noon in Colonial Hall and continue until Friday noon. It is impossible to tell yet how many entries there will be, because they are all the time arriving. Mrs. Elisabeth L. Brace, the secretary, yesterday morning received nineteen entries. Many fine prizes are offered. These are divided equally between the short-haired and the long-haired cats.

GET PRIZES AT CAT SHOW – Pittsburgh Daily Post, 23rd November, 1905
Mrs. Richard Hardy, of 7502 Trevonia avenue, Wilkins Place, Swissvale, returned yesterday from Rochester, N.Y., where she attended the fifth annual championship show of the Lockehaven Cat club, of Rochester, held last week. Only young Persian stock were entered by Mrs. Hardy, among the different kinds being sable tabbies, orange tabbies, blacks and tortoise-shell. They took four first prizes, four second prizes and two specials in novice and senior kitten classes in very close competition, 300 entries having been made at the show from catteries all over the country.

PREPARING FOR EUCHRE PARTY – Democrat and Chronicle, 24th December, 1905
The Lockehaven Cat Club is preparing for an elaborate euchre party on Thursday evening at Teall's. The club will give the party to defray in part the debt incurred by the recent cat show. A few tickets are still left. If any of the club's friends have been overlooked it wishes them to procure tickets by calling at the home of Mrs. Walter R. Stone, No. 101 South Fitzhugh street.

1907 ROCHESTER CAT SHOW

PLANNING FOR NEXT CAT SHOW – Democrat and Chronicle, 19 December, 1906
Lockehaven Club to Ask C. F. A. for Week in December, 1907. At a meeting of the Lockehaven Cat Club held yesterday afternoon in the home of its president, Mrs. Alfred Jackson, No. 143 Meigs street, the members decided to get from the Cat Fanciers’ Association a sanction for the first week in December of next year, for a cat show. The reason for obtaining the dates so far ahead is that this time is considered especially good for an exhibition, and would be likely to he engaged by other clubs.

Two persons were proposed for membership in the club. The secretary, Mrs. Elizabeth L. Brace, attended the Royal Cat club's show in Toronto last week. She entered her blue cat, Lady Gentian, which won first prise and three specials. She was the only Rochester cat in the show. Eight of Miss Jane R. Cathcart’s cats were shown by Mrs. Brace, who exhibits them for Miss Cathcart, who spends the winter in Paris, and all took prizes. Mrs. Brace will go the day after Christmas to Stamford, Conn., to ex-hibit Lady Gentian and Miss Cathcart's cats. After the show there she will return to Rochester, on Saturday of next week. New Year's night she will start for New York, where the cats will be exhibited in the Atlantic club's show, and from there she will take them to Detroit. Mrs. Jackson and probably other local fanciers will enter cats in the Atlantic show.

The Short Haired Cat Society has received from Dr. R. Ottolengui, of New York, a champion cup, offered for the best Manx cat. Mrs. Jackson served refreshments.

1908 ROCHESTER CAT SHOW

DISTINGUISHED CATS ARE COMING TO TOWN – Democrat and Chronicle, 2nd November 1908
Probably the most distinguished group of cats that ever came to Rochester will arrive on Thursday from Oradell, N.J. For several years Mrs. Elizabeth L. Brace, secretary of Lockehaven Cat Club, has had charge of the showing of Miss Jane R. Cathcart’s cats, and this season she will keep them with her in Rochester when they are not on exhibition. About fifteen are expected. Among them will be the pair of great English silver tabbies, Champion Silver Stripes and Champion Dame Fortune II., parents of Genesee Valley Jane, owned by Mrs. Brace. Genesee Valley Jane was the “best kitten" in the Connecticut Club «how held in Hartford last spring. She won over all the long haired kittens. This was the first case in which a short-haired kitten in this country had been best in the show. The judges said she was the most perfect specimen they had ever seen.

A pair of Abyssinian cats, the only ones In America, will come. Three Russian females and the only Russian male in thls country are booked for the trip. The male is Peterkin, owned by Mrs. Mary S. Sage, of this city, although he has been kept at the Oradell cattery this season. There will also be sent two Siamese males and a pair of white cats with blue eyes. All but one of the pets were imported and their average worth in money is said to b $100.

Mrs. Brace and Mrs. Sage returned a short time ago from Oradell, where they attended a large reception given by Miss Cathcart, at the cattery. Mrs. Sage spoke on “The Short- haired Cat Society of America.” She is vice-president of the national organization and regent of the Rochester chapter. The short haired cat is gaining in popularity and fanciers say that many former breeders of the long haired pussies are now raising short-haired ones.

ROCHESTER CATS PURR WITH PRIDE. COVERED THEMSELVES WITH GLORY AT SYRACUSE SHOW. Democrat and Chronicle, 7th December, 1908
Many Rochester cats carry their heads high now because of the many prizes they took in Syracuse last week, when the club of that city and the Lockehaven joined in holding the largest show ever held in America. Three hundred and thirty entries were made, sixty of which were from Rochester. The greatest prize winners were American bred, which is a triumph for home breeders, as the champions at former shows have nearly all been imported.

A number of fanciers from other parts of the country, who were at this show accompanied Mrs. Elizabeth L. Brace to this city and were her guests Saturday and yesterday, expecting to return to their various homes to-day. The visitors were Mrs O. B. Smith, of Cleveland; Mrs. O. L. Dosch, editor of the Cat Review, of Elizabeth, N. J.; Mrs. H. G. of Grand Rapids, Mich.; Mrs. F. G. Mathis of Noroton Heights, Conn, Joshua Copeland. Jr., of Ward. Pa.

On Friday night, these fanciers were entertained by Mrs. P. T. Luitwieler at her home in Savannah street. Mrs. W.A. Pets gave a luncheon for them on Saturday. Later in the afternoon the women who attend the show in Syracuse from Rochester and other places, gave a theater party at Cook’s. At 6 o'clock they had dinner and in the evening they were entertained by Mr. and Mrs. A. B. Hendricks, at their home in Gibbs street. The entertaining came to an end last night with a dinner at Mrs. Brace’s in Frost avenue, given by the women who went to Syracuse. Some thirty persons were present.

The cats that won prizes at the show were as follows: Mrs K. W. Miller's Fluff won first in a class of eleven, best in the show, also nine specials, including wins on two challenge cups and several medals. Fluff is a short-haired blue and white neuter. Gold Nugget, also owned by Mrs. Miller, won second and three specials. It is an orange tabby three months old.

Mrs. F. H. Dennis’s brown tabby kitten won first and eight specials. Cats owned by Mrs. C.J. Browning won several firsts and one blue kitten was “best long haired junior kitten in the show." This kitten also won the Syracuse challenge cup for best kitten bred and owned by an exhibitor. A black short haired kitten, owned by Mrs. William Alband, won first prize, J. T. Hagan’s black kitten, Strongheart Jr., won first in a class of seven and a medal. Cats shown by Misses Elizabeth and Emma Perrin won three first prizes and many specials. Dingley Potentate was best long-haired silver tabby In the show. Matilda Jane, shown by Mrs Florence E. Brockway, took prize for "best waif from Rochester.”

Genesee Valley Jane, a short-haired silver tabby, owned by Mrs. Brace, won the prize for second-best cat in the show, over every short haired and longhaired cat in the show, the best cat in the show being a blue-eyed white Persian owned by Mrs. H.G. Dykehouse, of Grand Rapids. Jane won two firsts, one in the open, over her mother. She also took thirty eight specials, among which were wins on twelve challenge cups and nine medals. Miss Cloe Strongheart, also owned by Mrs. Brace, won second in the novice class and second in a strong kitten class of seven.

Peterkin, a fine Russian short-haired blue owned by Mrs. Mary S. Sage, won a championship in the American Cat Association, also first and two medals. F. G. Holroyd exhibited five cats, four of which won firsts and seconds and many specials. A cat owned by Mrs. A. W Tallman won first and a special. Mrs. W. S. Russell's Manx male won first and a special and a win on the challenge cup for best Manx in the show. Mrs J.C. Urquhart's brown tabby female, Jewel, took first and a win on a challenge cup. Her kitten, Amy, Bosart, won first, and Glory, a black and white kitten, second and a medal.

Many of the Rochester women were on committees for the show. Those who attended were Mrs. E.W. Miller, Miss Emma Perrin, Mrs. F.H. Dennis, Mrs. E.L. Brace, Mrs. F. C. Whitney, Mrs. H.S. Taylor, Mrs. A.B. Hendricks, Mrs. J C. Urquhart, Mrs. D. Sumner Wilson, Mrs. Charles Mann, Mrs. P.T. Luitwieler, Mrs. Florence Ellis Brockway, Mrs. Nellie Webb and daughter, Lillian, Mrs. C. J. Browning, F G. Holroyd and Harry Jones.

The show closed with an elaborate banquet at the Jefferson Hotel. The ice cream was in the form of yellow cats. The menu was all in "cat language.” The table decorations were in Copenhagen blue, the color of the Syracuse show. Joshua Copeland, Jr., of Ward, Pa., was toastmaster.

HIGHEST HONORS TO IMPORTED CAT. Democrat and Chronicle, 9th December, 1909
Honoria of Highgate is bolding her head high, for the judges at the sixth championship show of the Lockehaven Cat Club, in progress at Convention Hall, have solemnly given forth the de-cision that she is “best cat in the show.”' She has also been declared the best longhaired female. These honors were not unexpected by Honoria, for such things have happenued to her before. About her cage are trophies of wins on both sides of the Atlantic. As told yesterday, her home until recently was in England. All around the outside of her cage hang orange ribbons with sunflowers for rosettes, bearing her name, that of the cattery where she lives, and her city, Elizabeth, N.J. Her owner is Miss Eva L. Pollard. Orange is also the shade of Honoria’s cage lining, which harmonises with her own color.

Sweeping over the magnificent array of Persians, with their long pedigrees, as well as the other short-hairs, Champion Silver Stripes comes out of the contest “best male in the show.” And what should happen to add to his triumph but that his consort, Dame Fortune, is declared the best short-haired female champion. These cats are both the property of Miss June R. Cathcart, of Oradell, N.J. Miss Cathcart has proved, in this case at least, her theory that if the ordinary short-haired cat has proper care it may b« cultivated to a high degree.

Wildow Worthy, owned by Miss S. Louise Mygrant, of Fanwood, N.J., comes out best long-haired male in the show. John Dunbar, owned by Mrs. Elizabeth L. Brace, manager of the show, has been pronounced “best stud judged by his get in the show." He wins five cups for best stud, which is the success breeders most value. Rex Basilins, owned by Mrs. Oliver H. Dosch, of Elizabeth, N.J., has the honor of being best silver in the show. Mrs. Dosch is editor of the Cat Review.

Pussies of high degree as far as ancestry goes don't get all the good things, for, like people, some with only “a lighting chance" in life have proved that environment wins. Such is the case with a number of the pets on exhibition. Tudelles, a short-haired, brown, tabby, was a waif until picked up in the street. Now he is the pet of Dr. Teed-Cramton. There is an interesting trait in this cat which astonishes some of the breeders - his care for his kittens, not common among the fathers. Madame Tudelles, being of a highly nervous temperament, doesn't like shows, and was left at home. Their two kittens, Tudelles II, and Zanzia, which are in the show, are cared for affectionately by their father. No better evidence of his disposition could be seen than in the fact that, if when he is asleep, one of them cries as if hurt, he wakens immediately and investigates the trouble. When the show closes for the night the kittens are put in his cage that he may guard them until time for the fanciers to come in the morning

Long ago Matilda Jane, whose story is known to many persons in this city, was found one cold winter morning with a broken leg. Her mistress, Mrs. Florence E. Brockway, took her in and gave her such care that Matilda is the equal of countless more fortunate cats and, besides is the mother of a good kitten. Ebony Boll, to which the judges will doubtless award something good in the line of specials.

Red Knight, owned by Mrs George Sharp, of Syracuse, is another waif. He took first prize in Syracuse and first and second prizes in the present show.

Some excellent Persians are shown by Mrs. J.B. Smith, of Cleveland. She has entered Concentry Alcaniara, the best tabby male; Rosalia, a white Persian, which took first prize, and Yancy, a big blue neuter. Mrs V. W. Onderdonk shows Buster, a long haired orange tabby with white, which takes a prize. Scotland Yet, owned by Miss. A.L. Pollard, is from Scotland and ranks high among the fine old sires with breeders.

1909 ROCHESTER CAT SHOW

PRIZES FOR CAT SHOW COME FAST. Democrat and Chronicle, 14th July, 1909
More than forty persons were present yesterday at the semi-annual meeting at the Lockehaven Cat Club, held in Seneca Park, where the members had luncheon at 1 o’clock. Plans for the show to be held in Convention Hall early in December were considered and there was everything to encourage the workers who have set about to raise funds months before the show season, as they are determined no effort shall be lacking to make the show a greater one than has been held in this country outside New York.

Challenge cups, medals and specials have been offered by clubs, societies and individuals, which, with the Lockehaven’s own, will make a total of almost three hundred awards. Cups have been offered by the clubs of Boston, Syracuse, Denver, Pittsburg, Connecticut, St. Louis and Washington, and by the Beresford and Royal Canadian Clubs; by the Short-Haired Cat, the Blue Cat and the Silver Cat Societies. Individual cups are offered as follows: Cat Review cup, Graves, Blue Coat, Agrette, Chorus Girl, Libolt, Dr. Clara E. Bowen, and the Van Vleet cups. Two medals will come from the Hartford Fair Association, two from the Blue Cat Association, one from the Silver Cat Society and a gold medal from Mr. and Mrs. W.C. Bell, of Toronto; a medal from Mrs. Clinton Locke, of Chicago; two from Miss Ella Braids, of Buffalo.

Members of the Syracuse Club have offered twelve cups, seven sterling silver medals and twenty-seven specials, and some of the members present yesterday told that there are more to come. Specials are offered by Mrs. W.J. Furness, Miss Laura G. Hopkins, Mrs. L.H. Graves, Miss Marion Johnson and Herman Johnson, all of New York. Miss Jane R. Cathcart, of Oradell, N.J., Mrs. J C. Ayres, of Watertown, and Miss Marion West, of Washington, Thomas C. Knott, of London, Ont., ’sends $5 for special prizes. Mrs. E. B. Cridler, of Dansville, offers the challenge cup, Daybreak; Miss Emma C. Flagler, of Auburn, a cup for the best orange and white short-haired neuter, and Mrs. Ada M. Travis, of New York, offers a cup.

Social affairs will be held frequently to raise funds for the show. Mrs. W.C. Green, Mrs. Sattler and Mrs. J.B. Hogan will give a picnic party on July 22d in Seneca Park. On the 28th Mrs. P.T. Luitwieler will give a novelty party. Mrs. Hinman S. Taylor will give a card party on the 27th.

Mrs. E.R. Boller and Mrs. Arthur C. Brace, of this city, and Mrs. W.J. Furness, a cartoonist, of New York, were admitted into the club's membership. Among those present from out of town were Miss E.M. Braids, of Buffalo; Mrs. F.L. Taylor and Mrs. P.A. Wilkinson, of Syracuse; Mrs. Mildred M. Hostetter, of Amigari, Ont., and E.B. Cridler, of Dansville. The hostesses were Mrs Elizabeth R. Brace chairman; Mn P.T. Lutwieler, Mrs H.S. Taylor, Mrs Irving W. Paul, Mrs. Arthur Neiner, Mrs L.A Sommerby, Mrs Nellie Webb, Mrs. D. Sumner Wilson, Mrs. C.D.U. Hobbie, Mrs. W.C. Green and Mrs. Satler.

THRONGS VISIT CHAMPION CATS – Democrat and Chronicle, 8th December, 1909
Such an array of cat aristocracy as greets visitors at the championship show opened by the Lockehaven Cat Club yesterday at noon in Convention Hall, not only gratifies fanciers directly interested in the exhibition, but delights as well all persons who like to see highbred animals. One not familiar with what in the judges estimation makes a valuable eat looks with admiration on some of the beautiful pussies here shown.

Shades of the cage linings are effective in setting off the beauties of the cats. Here is an instance of house furnishings harmonizing with the complexions of the occupants. White cats with blue eyes are in cages lined with blue or one cage lined with a conspicuous green precisely the correct shade. There is [one] at which one wonders until the pretty silver inside displays a pair of green eyes, set off to advantage by the unusual lining. Orange and some brown tabbies look well with shades of blue. There are cushions to match the linings or, at all events, to harmonize with them and with the fair pussy's complexion.

Twenty cats entered from Canada have not arrived. They are held in the custom house, and because of this delay their classes will not be judged until the cats come.

Many of the best short-haired cats are entered by Miss Jane R. Cathcart, of Oradell, N.J., owner of the Black Short-Haired Cattery and a pioneer in the breeding of the ordinary, short- haired American cat. She shows eighteen. One is Champion Dame Fortune and another is Bunny. She also exhibits a Manx cat, white with blue eyes. Miss Cathcart, originator of the plan for exterminating the stray cat by compulsory registration of all males, is a director of the Lockehaven Club. She has a winter home in France that includes a cattery.

This show has complimentary recognition by the Eastman Kodak Company in that it manufactured a slide for this week’s programme at the Hippodrome, where there comes out in connection with the advertisement a picture of Peter Pan, in all his glory, a shaded silver owned by Mrs. P. T. Luitwieler.

No finer kittens in their class are on exhibition than Mrs. C.J. Browning’s blues. Two are the kittens of Scotland Yet, a great sire owned by Miss Ava L. Pollard, of Elizabeth, N.J., and two others were sired by Honorable John Danbar, owned by Mrs. ElizaBeth L. Brace, of Rochester, manager of the show. Their mother is Carminilla, best blue junior kitten in the Syracuse show last year. Mrs. Browning also shows White Magnet and Silver.

One of the best cream cats in this country is exhibited by Miss S. Louise Mygrant, of Fanwood, N.J. This is Wilden Worthy, recently imported from England, now shown for the first time on this side. White Monk, winner of numerous prizes and specials, is in the same first-class condition that distinguished him when he was shown here four years ago. Monk doesn’t like his friends to pass without speaking. A young woman whom he has seen many times passed his cage yesterday without speaking, and he called her back promptly to apologize for the omission.

The Misses Perrin, well known locally as breeders, have some good entries. They show Dingly Potentate, a silver tabby that always has won first prizes. He is from the Dingly stock of England, himself imported, and his cage is hung with trophies. Heather Bell, a blue owned by the Misses Perrin, also takes first in her class.

Mrs. F. L. Taylor, secretary of the Syracuse Club, exhibits Beazer, of the Salina Cattery, a Siamese of remarkable shadings in brown from the darkest to leather or tan. Beazer has been the best short haired neuter in every show in which he has been entered and has won three challenge cups and a hundred ribbons.

Mrs Mary S. Sage, president of the Lockehaven Club, entertained the exhibitors and out of town guests at tea in the lunch room. Tonight the club will have as its guests all the exhibitors of other towns, at a dinner at the Hotel Seneca.

Prizes have been awarded as follows:

Open Class – Long-haired cats
White male, blue eyes – First, Romeo White Emperor, H.G. Dykehouse.
White male, golden eyes – First, Champion White Monk, Miss Ava L. Pollard; second Sloanie Snowdrop, Mrs. John Malcolm.
Black male - First, Honorable John Dunbar, Mrs Elizabeth L. Brace; second, Black Knight, Mrs. W.E. Dysinger; third, Black Beauty, Mrs. Dysinger.
Blue male – First, Pan II, Johua Cowpland, Jr.; second, King Blue Jay, Mrs. C.A. Libolt; third, Scotland Yet, Miss Ava L. Pollard.
Blue female – First, Honoria of Highgate, Miss Pollard; second, Bluecoat Winona, Mrs. Mortimer Mumford; third, Mencara, Mrs. T. Keogh.
Cream male – First, Wildon Worthy, Miss S. Louise Mygrant.
Cream female – First, Alice, Mrs. W.M. Chapman.
Orange female – First, Champion Istar II of Gladdisfenn, J.H.Reinhard.
Silver male – First, King Rex Basileus, Mrs. O.L. Dosch; second, Al-Tarek, Mrs. Dosch; third, Rob Roy of Arrandale, Mrs. G.H. Lynas.
Shaded silver, male – First, Silver King, Mrs. Mary A. Warren, second [no names!]
Shaded silver, female – First, Silver Cricket, Miss Ella M. Braids; second, Logan Waddie, Mrs. C.H. Lynns; third, Emogene, Mrs. Walter F. MacGuire.
Masked silver, male – First, Roseben, Mrs. James Conlisk.
Masked silver, female – Second, Cinders, Miss Perrin.
Smoke, female – First, Dorocy, Dr. C.C. Duchscherer; second, London Smoke, Mrs. Clarence Duchscherer; third, Beverly, Miss S. Louise Mygrant.
Silver tabby, male – First, Toddington, Miss Gwendolyn Fletcher; second, the Dingley Potentate, Miss Perrin.
Silver tabby, female – First, Priscilla of Salina, Mrs. F.L. Taylor; second, Coventry Philomel, Mrs. Jeanette B. Smith; third, Champion Ladysmith of Salina, Mrs. F.L. Taylor.
Brown tabby, male – First, Coventry Alcantara, Mrs. Jeanette B. Smith; second, Waverly Bumble, Mrs. J.C. Urquhart; third Akkomi, Mrs. W.M. Chapman.
Brown tabby, female – First, Painted Lady, Mrs. W.M. Chapman; third, Waverly Amy Robsart, Mrs. J.C. Urquhart; third, Muff, Mrs. J.D. Trant.
White, green eyes, male or female – Second, Lady Blanch, F.G. Holroyd.
Tortoiseshell with white – First, Susetta, Mrs. Hattie B. Peel.
Another color with white, male or female – Goldenrod, Mrs. Hattie B. Peel.
Orange tabby, neuter – First, Teddy R, Dr. W.J. Tillman.
Any other color, neuter – First, Rhea, Mrs. W.B. Frye; second, Fluff, Mrs. J.D. Trant; third, Jackdaw, Mrs. N.W. Stewart.
Ticked tabby, neuter – First, The Gingerbread Man, Lawrence La Cava.
Any Other colour in white, neuter – First, Buster, Mrs. H.A. Boeden; second, Ted, Mrs. Hattie B. Peel; second, Barabbas, Mrs. C.P.H. Vary.

Novice Classes Long-haired Cats

Blue, female – First, Mencara, Mrs T. Keogh; second, Minnehaha, Mrs. Monroe.
Cream, male or female – First, Alice, Mrs. W.M. Chapman.
Silver, male – First, Lord Phantom, Mrs. James Conlisk.
Shaded silver, male – First, Silver Come the Messenger, Miss M.E. braids; second, The Lord Mayor, Mrs. W.B. Frye.
Smoke, female – First, Beverly, Miss S. Louise Mygrant.
Silver tabby, female – First Jasqueminot, Dr. J.C. Urquhart
Brown tabby, male – First, Waverly Bumble, Mrs. J.C. Urquhart
Any other color, male or female – First, Beautie Mrs. E.H. Rhodes.
Blue, female – First, Waverly Dunbar, Mrs. E.L. Brace.
Blue, male – First, Tipisco, Mrs. W.M. Chapman; second, Coventry medindie, mrs. Jeanette B. Smith; third, Septimus, Dr. J.S. Niven.
Smoke – First, Caprice, George Case.
Cream or orange – First, Allee, Mrs. W.M. Chapman.
Silver or shaded silver, male – Second, Silver King, Mrs. I.T. Johnson.
Silver tabby – First Jasqueminot, Dr. J.C. Urquhart; second, Lady Betty, Miss Annie L. Woods.
Brown tabby – First, Waverly Bumble, Mrs. J.C. Urquhart; second, Akkomi, Mrs. W.L. Chapman; third, Fritz, Cornelia Stark.
Any other color – First, Brownie, Chauncey Fowler; second, Muffy, Miss Annie L. Woods.
Any other color with white – First, Laddie, Mrs H.B. Peel; second, Joe, Mrs. Peel.

Junior Kitten Class

Black – First, Frisk, Mrs. W.E. Dysinger.
Cream or orange – First, Red Light, J.H. Reinhard; Billie, Mrs. M.H. Buvinger; third, Betty, Mrs. Buvinger.
Silver or shaded silver – First, Irma, Mrs. C.J. Browning.
Any color tabby – First, Midget, Mrs. F.H. Dennis; second, Prince Rajah, Mrs. J.F. Sullivan; third, Bunchie Boy, Mrs. Albert E. Walls.
Any other color with white – First, Mother Kitty, Mrs. F.J. Simmons; second, Kid, F.C. Holroyd.

Open Class Short-haired Cats

White female, blue eyes – First, Champion Snowdrift, Miss Cathcart.
Black, male – First, Royal Chester Achilles.
Blue or maltese, female – First, Puss, G.J. Welch; second, Seneca Fiametta, Mrs. Mary S. Sage.
Smoke, female – Second, Cinderella, Miss Cathcart.
Silver tabby, male – First, Champion Silver Stripes, Miss Cathcart.
Silver tabby, female – First, Champion Dame Fortune II., Miss Cathcart; second, Bussie Grey, Mrs. L.G. Kelley.
Orange tabby, male – First, Red Knight, Mrs. George Sharp.
Orange tabby, female – First, Babylu, Mrs. Adam Rosenzweig.
Brown of gray tabby, male – First, Fizz, Mrs. Mary Mills Jensen; second, Tudelles, Dr. Isa Toed-Cramtom; third, Fritz, Mrs. G.L. Page.
Brown or gray tabby, female – First, The Lady in Brown, Miss Cathcart; second, Tabitha, Miss Cathcart.
Manx, male – First, Bunnie, Miss Cathcart.
Manx, female – second, Satan, Mrs. F. Taylor Shute.
Russian, female – First, Speedwell of Bath, Miss Cathcart; second, Champion Sacha, Miss Cathcart.
Siamese, male – First, Champion Siam de Paris, Miss Cathcart.
Siamese, female – First, Romeo Amanda, Mrs. H.G. Dykhouse.
Abyssinian, male – Champion Aluminium II., Miss Cathcart.
Abyssinian, female – First, Champion Salt, Miss Cathcart.
Any other color with white, male or female – First, The Landlord, Mrs. G.W. Davenport; second, Busy buster, Mrs. Nellie Webb.
Silver tabby, neuter – First, Buster C., Mrs. C.W. Curtis; second, Billy C., Mrs. Curtis.
Any other color with white, neuter – First Fluff Miller, Mrs. E.W. Miller; second, Patsy Hanford, Mrs. H.B. Peel.
Manx, male – Third, Tinker Bell, Mrs. E.R. Roller.
Russian neuter – First, Alexis, Miss Cathcart.
Siamese, neuter – First, Baazer of Salina, Mrs. F.L. Taylor.

Kitten Classes

Any color with white – First, Billy, F.G. Holroyd; second, Smut, Mrs. H.B. Peel.

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