REPORTS FROM EARLY BRITISH CAT SHOWS (1882 - 1883)

These are reports of the early British cat shows that I've collected from various newspapers and show catalogues. The earliest reports reflect the novelty of cat shows and describe only a few of the entrants.

1882 CRYSTAL PALACE CAT SHOW

CAT SHOW AT THE CRYSTAL PALACE. South London Press , 14th October 1882
The fourteenth “National Cat Show” was held on Tuesday and Wednesday at the Crystal Palace, and attracted a large company of visitors. The specimens were this year shown in the west gallery, where they were housed in wire pens, and received every attention from those appointed to look after their comfort. The show was deficient in numbers as compared with that held in 1881, but the quality of the exhibits was far superior. The long-haired varieties in particular made up a grand exhibition. Though known the National Cat Show, this exhibition is in reality chiefly supported by South London exhibitors. There were a few exhibits from a distance, but they formed mere fraction of those sent from local patrons. It ought to be known that the owners of valuable feline specimens who reside beyond the home counties are generally somewhat chary of entrusting their pets to the tender mercies of railway employes, neither they regard with satisfaction the baggage vans in which their cats are sent by rail. They are draughty and as “Tom” and “Nellie ” are seldom allowed beyond the limits of the drawing-room when home, they are, of course, peculiarly sensitive to cold in transit. Hence it happens that there are only one or two specimens from far-away counties; and though the show was beyond doubt a good one, it cannot said to have contained the creme de la crème of our feline live stock. The judges were Mr. W. B. Tegetmeier and Mr. George Billett. We append a full list of the South London prize-takers:
Short-haired He Cats, Tortoiseshell, or Tortoiseshell and White. - Miss M. Thomas, 6, Eliot Bank, Forest Hill, 1; Mrs. Tullett, Westow Hill, Upper Norwood, 2; Mr. J. Plant, 4, Gipsy-road, Lower Norwood, 3.
Blue Silver Tabby. - Mrs. Durman, 1, Chatham Terrace, Upper Norwood, 1; Mrs. Brunton, lona, The Avenue, Gipsy Hill, 2.
Spotted Tabby. - Miss A. Dickenson, 13, Victoria Cottages, Woodland-road, Upper Norwood, 1.
Black and White. - Mr. G. Hounslow, Southborough, Bickley, Kent, 1: Mrs. Miller, North Dulwich, 2; Mr. W. L. Evans, 5, Wheathill-road, Anerley, 3; Mrs. Miller, h.c.
Black.- - Mrs. A. White, 4, Rose Cottages, Woodlandroad, Upper Norwood, 1; Mrs. J. Possett, Sylverton Villa, Hamilton-road, Lower Norwood, 3.
Manx (any Colour). - Mr. W. H. Thomas, Ormonde House, Lessness Heath, Kent, 1; Mrs. A. F. Paice, 3, Belmont Villas, St. Peter’s-road, Croydon, h. c.
Short-haired She Cats. Tortoiseshell. - Mr. G. Abbs, Streatham Lodge, Lower Streatham,2; Mrs. J. Tomlin, Blackbrook Farm, Bickley, Kent, 3.
Brown Tabby, or Brown Tabby and White. - Miss Lucy Collins, Sunny Bank. Knockholt, Kent, 1.
Blue or Silver Tabby.- Miss J. Gardiner, Yew Tree Cottage, Hamilton-road, Lower Norwood, 1; Mrs. M. Brunton, 2; Mrs. Durman, h.c.
Spotted Tabby. - Mr. J. A. Willmott, Oakley House, 209, Brockley-road, 1; Mrs. M. A. Newton, Woolsthorpe, The Avenue, Gipsy Hill, 2; ditto, 3.
Black and White. - Mr. J. Trusson, 84, Cemetery-road, Croydon, 1; ditto, 2.
Black. - Mr. J. Fossett, 1.
White. - Mr. J. Harris. Holmwood, Bickley Park, Kent, 1; Mr. H. Swinyard, St. John’s Villas, Rommany-road, Lower Norwood, 2; Mr. W. King, 8, Hadlow-place, Anerley, 3.
Any Other Variety. - Mrs. A. F. Paice, 3.
Manx (any Colour). - Mr. W. H. Thomas, 1.
Two Best Marked Kittens, Short-haired (any Colour), under Six Months. - Mr. J. Trusson, 3.
Long-haired He Cats. Pure White. - Mrs. Weekley, 5, Marlhorough-street, Blackfriars-road, 2.
Black. - Mrs. C. Lee, New House, Penshurst, Kent, 2.
Tabby, Tabby and White. - Mr. G. Baylis. The Waterfall House, Lower Tooting, 3; Miss Strang, 13, Queen Adelaide-read, Penge, h.c.; Miss Mary Gresham, 51, Kent House-road, Sydenham, h. c.; Mr. W. Punton, care of Mr. R, B. Martin, M.P., Chislehrst, c.; Mrs. M. Brunton, c.
Any Other Variety. - Miss Luning, 2, Grote’s-place, Blackheath, 1; Miss Turner, 7, Colby Terrace, Gipsy Hill, 2.
Long-haired She Cats. Pure White. - Miss A. S. Hobbs, 10, Zingari Terrace, Gipsy-road, Norwood, 3.
Black.— - Mrs. H. C. Mayhew, Melrose House, South Norwood, 2.
Tabby, or Tabby and White. - Miss Baylis, 1; Mrs. Weekley, 2.
Any Other Variety. - Mrs. Moore, St. Norman’s, Anerley-road, 1; Miss G. Hyde, Monte Bello, Honor Oak Park, 2; Miss Bateson, 2, Folkestone Villas, South Norwood (extra), 3.
Best Two Kittens Under Six Months (any Colour). - Mrs. Moore, St. Norman’s, Anerley-road, h. c.
For Weight Only.- Miss L. Hammond, Streatham Lodge, Lower Streatham, 1.
Gelded Short-haired Cats. Tabby (any Colour, White). - Mrs. Harding, 19, St. Aubyn's-rood, Upper Norwood, 1; Mr. H. Laflin, 3, Castle-place, Lower Norwood, 2; Miss S. J. Callam, Avalon Villa, Selhurst-road, South Norwood, 3.
White.—Mr. H. Swinyard, 2.
Black, or Black and White.- Mrs. Donkin, Fir Croft, Beulah Hill. Upper Norwood, 1.
Any Other Variety. - Miss P. M. Bowling, Carlisle House, Central Hill, Upper Norwood, 2; Miss E. Giblin, 1, Roseneath Cottages, Ravenscroft-road, Birkbeck, Kent, 3.
Gelded Long-haired Cats. Black, or Black White. - Mr. J. Moores, Southborough, Bickley, Kent, 3.
Any Other Variety. - Mrs. U. C. Mayhew, 2. Short-haired Cats Belonging to Working Men
Black and White He Cat. - Mrs. G. Scrimshaw, Nash's Cottages, Newtown, Upper Norwood, 1; Mr. J. Harris, 2.
Tabby Cat (Male or Female). - Mr. A. Smith, Refreshment Department, Crystal Palace,1; Mr. Tullett, Westwood Hill, Upper Norwood, 2; Mrs. H. McEvoy, 34, Rommany-road, Lower Norwood, h. c.
White Cat (Male or Female). - Mrs. J. Ruffles, 10, Atlantic-road, Brixton, 1; Mr. W, Green, 2, Cambridge Grove Penge, 2.
Black Cat (Male or Female). - Mr. Stratton, Rose Cottage, Birkbank-road, Streatham. 1; Mr. W. Wookey, 7, Maude Villas, Rodwell-road, East Dulwich. 2; Mr. C. Lamberth, 2, Royal Terrace, Westow Hill, Upper Norwood, h.c.
Two Kittens (any Colour). - Mrs. Knight. 2; Mrs. J. Woods, 10, Champness Terrace, Clive-road, Lower Norwood, h. c.
Gelded Cats Belonging to Working Men.
Short-haired. - Miss A. Paddy, 12, Palace-road, Upper Norwood, 1; Mr. H. Pace, 1, Hawthorn Grove, Penge, 2.
Long-haired - Mrs. G. F. Baldwin, The Limes, Moffat-road, New Thornton Heath, 2.

CAT SHOW AT THE CRYSTAL PALACE. Leighton Buzzard Observer and Linslade Gazette, 17th October 1882
The National Cat Show, now in the 14th year of its existence, was opened at the Crystal Palace on Tuesday. The entries - divided into sixty classes - number 169. Special prizes were offered for animals belonging to working men, and these have excited a brisk competition. With many sub-divisions, the individual classes were not large, so that Messrs. W. B. Tegetmeier and George Billett, who undertook the duties of judges, had a comparatively easy task. In a short haired class Miss M. Thomas, Eliot Bank, Forest Hill, took the first award with a beautiful tabby, and a silver tabby, belonging to Mrs. Durman, Chatham Terrace, Upper Norwood, secured first prize in another class. Mr. W. L. Evans, of Wheat Hill Road, Anerley, took a third prize. Manx cats were an interesting feature, and here Mr. Thomas’s Mona, which has two kittens with her, caught the judges’ fancy. The white cats were, as a whole, very fine, but in the best black male or female class, Zulu, which has won first prizes at the Palace shows in 1879, 1880, and 1881, and also at Newcastle and at Teignmouth, was beaten by a fine cat, four years old, belonging to Mr. Stratton, of Birkbeck Road, Streatham. Among tortoiseshells, Mr. W. C. Ellis, of Coombe Down, Bath, wins chief honours with Bess, a very beautiful creature, aged two years and a half.

1882 LOCAL CAT SHOWS

TAUNTON POULTRY, PIGEON, BRITISH AND FOREIGN CAGE BIRD, AND CAT SHOW. Bristol Mercury, 19th January, 1882
The Taunton Poultry, Pigeon, British and Foreign Cage Bird, and Cat Show has been fixed for the 22nd and 23rd of February. Mr. T.G. Williams is the honorary secretary, from whom all information may be obtained.

GOSFORTH (near Newcastle-on-Tyne) POULTRY, PIGEON, AND CAT SHOW. Morpeth Herald, 21st January, 1882
Gosforth (Near Newcastle-on-Tyne) Poultry, Pigeon, and Cat Show will be held in the School Room on the 17th and 18th February, 1882. Entries close 6th February. Schedules now ready. Apply to the Secretaries.

BIDEFORD POULTRY, PIGEON, AND CAT SHOW. Western Times , 16th February 1882
A very successful exhibition of poultry, pigeons, cats, and cage birds was opened yesterday at Bideford, and will continue open to-day (Thursday). The show was the largest that has been held in the West of England, being about double the size of the show at Barnstaple, and larger by about 100 entries than the show at Plymouth. This, for the inaugural show, is exceedingly gratifying to the promoters and highly promising for the future. [. . .] The following list does not contain the prizes for English female cats as they were not obtainable until a late hour. Judges: Poultry, Pigeons, and Cats - W. J. Nicholls Esq., London.
Class 73 - English Male Cats – 1, F. Drake and W Blackford junr.; 2, W. Sewell; 3, R. Gould; 4, Mrs. Hill.
[Class 74 - English Male Cats]
75 - Foreign Male Cats – 1, Mrs. McLeod; 2, Mrs. Hinchcliff; 3, W. C. O. Ellis, 4, Fred. Folly.
76 - Foreign Female Cats - 1, Captain Moles worth; 2, W C O Ellis; 3, Mrs. Gardner.
77 - Cats (geldings) – 1, R. Dymond; 2, Smale. 3, W. H. Ackland, M.D.; 4, F. Skinner. ***

POULTRY SHOW AT TAUNTON. Western Daily Press , 23rd February 1882
Under the most favourable auspices, the first annual exhibition of the Taunton and West of England Poultry, Pigeon, British and Foreign Cage Bird, and Cat Show was held yesterday. It was at first intended to hold the show in the Castle, but this idea was abandoned, and the committee were fortunate enough to secure the Victoria Assembly Rooms and the Com Exchange for the purpose. [. . .] There was by no means inconsiderable muster of “pussies,” and these received a large share of attention, there being a number of good specimens of tabbies. [. . .] The judges were Mr J. Martin, Worcester, for poultry; Mr T. Coke, Bumell, for pigeons; and Mr Billett, of Southampton, for cage birds and cats.

MARGATE DOG AND CAT SHOW Whitstable Times and Herne Bay Herald - Saturday 06 May 1882
Local Entries in the Margate Dog and Cat Show. —Mr. Tyhurst exhibited in the Long-haired Cats' Class, and the first prize was gained by his Ruff, as also the second best in the show prize.

LETTING THE CAT OUT OF THE BOX. Western Gazette, 9th June 1882
Jones v. Williams. Mr. William Jones, of Mantle Street, Wellington, sued Mr. Thomas George Williams, of Taunton, secretary to the Taunton and West of England Poultry, Pigeon, Cage Bird, and Cat Show Society, to recover £2 6s 6d, for the loss of the plaintiff 's cat. - Mr. Bond, who appeared for the plaintiff, stated that a show was held at Taunton on the 22nd and 23rd of February, in which the plaintiff entered a cat, which was sent from Wellington to Taunton, where it duly arrived, and was highly commended. After the show, through the negligence of the defendant, the cat was allowed to escape from the box before being sent away. The consequence was that the plaintiff wrote to the Secretary demanding the value of the cat, but as he could obtain no redress he brought the present action. - His Honour asked if there was anything to create liability. - The defendant drew His Honour's attention to the 10th rule the Society, which was as follows: - " Due care will be taken for the comfort of the exhibits while at the show, competent persons being appointed to properly feed and watch the whole of the specimens." Rule 12 further stated: "The greatest care will be taken of the specimens, but the Committee will not be responsible for an accident, mistake, loss, or damage, from whatever cause arising, the specimens being at the sole risk of the exhibitors." The defendant also put in the entry form, which the plaintiff signed and submitted to these rules. His Honour stated that it was the duty of the committee of such exhibitions to appoint competent and proper persons to manage their affairs, but beyond this they could not do anything. He did not see how any action could lie against the Secretary, and the only thing the plaintiff could do would be to prove that the committee had not appointed competent persons. - Mr. Bond stated that he did not commence the action, and that he should not have done so against the Secretary, he would, however, be prepared to show that the committee had not carried out their rules, inasmuch as competent persons had not been appointed. - His Honour held that upon the case before him he must order a non-suit.

Case alluded to in the Taunton Courier, and Western Advertiser, 14th June 1882
I hope none of the stock at either show will run away at the finish, as befell Mr Jones's cat, of Wellington, at the last poultry and cat show, for the loss of which pussy's owner so uselessly sued Mr Secretary Williams in the County Court on Monday. It would scarcely embolden cat show secretaries if they had to pay for every Tommy or Tibbie whose amatory perversity induced it to prefer a walk on the tiles to incarceration in a homeward bound basket. Happily in this instance the judge showed more consideration for the secretary's ‘feelins’, than for the stray ‘feline’ of Mr Jones.

DOG AND CAT SHOW, SUDBURY. Essex Standard, 15th July 1882
A capital little Dog and Cat Show was held here on Monday last, under the management of Mr. J. F. Hills. Eight classes were made for dogs, and five for cats. [No details of cats, prizes oe who judged the cats were given.]

CAT SHOW. TO THE EDITOR OF THE BELFAST NEWS-LETTER. Belfast News-Letter, 20th July 1882
Sir. - In these show times, when even barmaids and babies are exhibited to an admiring public, why should not cats be shown, if not by themselves, at least at a dog show? Awkward results might arise if they were shown with pigeons or parrots. They are, however, as dear as these last to the hearts of old maids, and surely some effort should be made to gratify this valuable, though unfortunately too numerous, section of our community. The old maid's parrot is a nuisance. Her dog is seldom ornamental, always useless. Her cat is of use, if only to eat the parrot. Please exert your powerful influence to promote cat shows in our province, with prizes for the best specimens of the various breeds from the snowy Persian to the tailless Manx. Cat shows are most popular at the Crystal Palace, Sydenham, and a dog and cat show was held last year at Birmingham. A beginning might be made in Ireland, where we already lead a cat-and-dog life, by reserving prizes for cats at the coming dog show at Newtownards. No scratching allowed. - Your obedient servant, ONE OF THE KILKENNY CATS.

OUNDLE SHOW. Stamford Mercury, 28th July, 1882
The Oundle Wesleyan Band of Hope held a most successful flower, rabbit, and cat show on Wednesday on the premises of Messrs. Siddons. The show was well arranged by an active committee, with Mr. John Siddons at their head.

FRIZINGTON DOG AND CAT SHOW.Carlisle Express and Examiner, 29th July 1882
The third annual exhibition of dogs and cats in connection with the Society which was started at Frizington and district, was held Tuesday and Wednesday in the Market Hall, Frizington. The show was a good one, and the entries were about 20 excess those of last year. The attendance Tuesday was not very numerous, price for admission being high, but the exhibition was fairly patronised. The following is a list of the awards:
Cats. Male Cat, any variety – 1, W.C.O. Ellis, Bath; 2. Wm. Bainbridge; 3, Mrs. Wade, Baildon, near Leeds. Five entries.
Female Cat, any variety than tortoiseshell – 1, John Cook, Distington; 2, Mrs. Johnson, Frizington; Very Highly Commended, Mrs. H.O. Shutt, Harrogate. Four entries.
Tortoiseshell Cat – 1, W.H. Fowler, Harrogate; 2, John E. Hazeldon, Frizington; Very Highly Commended, Mrs. Bryan, Whitehaven; Edward Gibson; James Corkhill, Cleator Moor; Charles Thompson, Frizington. Six Entries.
Male or Female Cat, any variety, confined to the Parish of Arlecdon – 1, Edward Shimming, Arlecdon; 2, Peter Wilson, Frizington; Very Highly Commended, Mrs Johnston; Edward Gibson; Charles Thompson; Commended, Wm. Shepherd, Yeat House; James Peel, Frizington. Eight Entries.

BARNARD CASTLE FLOWER SHOW. Norther Echo, 26th August, 1882
The fortieth annual show of the Barnard Castle Floral and Horticultural Society was held yesterday in the grounds of the castle. Over £90 was offered in prizes. The weather was not propitious. A heavy rain fell for the greater part of the afternoon. [. . .] There was also a small poultry and cat show, the pens for which were supplied by the Excelsior Pen Company, Darlington. The following were the judges: Cats – Mrs. Stenton, Middleton, and F.E. Gibson.

HORSE, DOG, POULTRY, PIGEON, RABBIT, AND CAT SHOW. Lincolnshire Chronicle, 29th September 1882
The horse, dog, poultry, pigeon, rabbit, and cat show, which is fixed to be held on Wednesday next, is likely to be an immense success. So far as the entries are concerned there has been a wonderfully good return in all the classes and every respect the exhibition promises to be one of the largest and best that has taken place in this part of the country for number of years. The list of entries this year in the respective classes is [. . .] cats 34. [Note - total entries 630, previous year’s total entries 173]

CAT SHOW, ONGAR FAIR. Chelmsford Chronicle - Friday 06 October 1882
Ongar Fair, Thursday October 12th, 1882 [. . .] A CAT SHOW – First Prize, £1; Second Prize, 10s; Third Prize, 5s. Exhibitors must enter Cats or Litters of Kittens a week previously, that cages may be provided.

MARKET RASEN HORSE, DOG, POULTRY, PIGEON, RABBIT, AND CAT SHOW. Stamford Mercury, 6th October 1882
The annual show of this society came off on Wednesday last, and proved to be the best that has been held in Market Rasen for some years. The following were the principal awards:- [cats not included in the list]

GRAND JAPANESE BAZAAR AT THE ASSEMBLY ROOMS (INCLUDING A CAT SHOW) Bath Chronicle and Weekly Gazette, 7th December 1882
A Cat Show took place on Monday [as part of the grand Japanese Bazaar]. The exhibits were numerous, and in almost all cases good. The method of awarding the prizes was novel, the visitors themselves being appointed judges. Each visitor was supplied with a card upon which he or she was expected to write the number of the animal in each class which was in his or her opinion the best exhibited. The tickets were then deposited in a box provided for the purpose, and the prizes awarded as soon as the counting of the votes" could be completed.

THE ABERDEEN DOG (AND CAT) SHOW. Aberdeen Press and Journal, 11th December 1882
We have been favoured with a schedule of the forthcoming dog and cat show, to be held in Aberdeen on 30th December, 1882, and 1st January, 1883. Last year the show extended over three days, but in order to meet the wishes of the competitors, who complained that it was too long to keep the dogs, the show will this year last for only two days. Mr Lort, of Wales, is to be the judge of the dogs, and Mr Cowe, Aberdeen, of the cats. The entries close on Saturday next. For the convenience of the exhibitors, certain members of the committee, whose names are specified in the prize schedule, will take entries at their places of business. The secretary, Mr. J.A. Adamson, will be present on Saturday evening at Macdonald’s Club Restaurant, Market Street, for the purposes of taking local entries.

HARROGATE FANCIERS’ SOCIETY CHRISTMAS SHOW Pateley Bridge & Nidderdale Herald, Saturday 30th December 1882
Yesterday the usual Christmas Show of the above society was held in St. James' Hall, Harrogate. The entries, on the whole, were considerably larger than they have ever been, and the quality in most departments showed also a marked improvement. This may be accounted for, perhaps, the fact that in addition to the usual money prizes, extras, in some cases of important value, were offered in each department. UM. E. Hutton, Pudsey, again adjudicated in all the classes, and again showed the discrimination for which he is so well known. His task, however, was rendered more than usually difficult by very bad light.

As usual, the cat show was highly interesting. This year they were divided into but two classes, long haired and short, hence the competition was much keener than heretofore. The entries numbered 14. The special for the best cat in the show was awarded to a red tabby, belonging to Mr. H. Shutt; second and third went to silver tabbies. Mr. Dennison won first with a long haired cat, and Mr. W. H. Milner second, each very good specimens.

NINTH ANNUAL SHOW. Aberdeen Evening News, 30th December 1882
The ninth annual show of dogs and cats is being held within the Volunteer Drill Hall, Woolmanhill, Aberdeen, to-day, and will be continued o Monday. The show promises to be a very successful one, the entries in both departments being considerably more in number than in any previous year. [. . .] There were twenty classes in all – 18 devoted to the different species of dogs and 2 of cats – and all were very well represented. There were upwards of 250 animals altogether in the show. [. . .]The judges were – of cats, Mr. John Cowe.

ABERDEEN DOG AND CAT SHOW [1882]. Aberdeen Press and Journal, 1st January 1883
Common cats – 1, Miss Maggie Ross; 2, James Wilson; 3, F.W.S. Gray; 4, Mrs Jessie Fraser, very highly commended Miss Isabella Black and Alex Mellet; highly commended Miss Littlejohn.
Any other variety, 4 entries – 1, Miss Robina Frew; 2, John Anderson; 3, W.C.T. Bowrieson.

1883 CRYSTAL PALACE CAT SHOW

SOME NEW LONDON TALK - THE SHOW OF CATS (1883) - The New York Times, October 30, 1883

It is not such ladies as these (education reformers) that are wasting their time and affections on cats, otherwise they might be recommended to inspect the excellent cat show - the fifteenth of its kind - which has just been opened at the Crystal Palace. A very interesting and amusing account of this exhibition appeared in the Daily Telegraph, yesterday, from the pen of Mr Phil Robinson, one of the most entertaining of writers on natural history, whose works, I believe, are well-known in America, where he recently traveled. The collection at the Crystal palace includes a number of very valuable animals, some of the kittens being sold for as much as $50 to $100 apiece, while on one superb tortoise-shell the fancy price of $50,000 has been placed by its adoring mistress, who, of course, would not part with it for any money. The judging of the show has been admirably done by Mr Harrison Weir, the distinguished naturalist and animal painter; but the Crystal Palace authorities made a most unfortunate mistake in this matter. They first invited Mr W B Tegetmeier, the editor of the natural history department of The Field, to act as judge, as he had done for many years before; but after he had accepted the engagement they suddenly discovered that "other arrangements" had previously been made, and so Mr Tegetmeier was told that his services would not be required, and Mr Harrison Weir was engaged. Naturally some unpleasantness has arisen from this awkward blunder, which is not mitigated by the fact that the two eminent naturalists do not exactly "hit it off." They are both, however, equally competent men, and Mr Weir, at his charming place, Weir Leigh, near Tunbridge, which was built and laid out from his own designs, and Mr Tegetmeier, at Finchley, in the north of London, have made valuable natural history collections, from their study of which they have been enabled to give the public very profitable results.

cat show

Ten thousand pounds for a cat sounds absurd. At the Fifteenth National Cat Show held at the Crystal Palace at Sydenham, this price was placed upon two of the feline race. One hundred pounds was a frequent figure. There were 350 specimens on view and the exhibition proved a fertile source of amusement to visitors. - The Evening Times, November 1st, 1883

An esteemed foreign contemporary, in his review of the Crystal Palace cat show, notes incidentally that the exhibition may possible help to dissipate the notion that keeping cats is a weakness or fondness peculiar to old maids, for the list of contributors shows that spinsters are not so many as one in six of the whole number. – The Topeka Daily Capital, November 13th, 1883

* * *

cat show

CRYSTAL PALACE CAT SHOW. (The Times, October 17, 1883)
With many signs of undiminished popularity, the 15th National Cat Show was opened yesterday at the Crystal Palace. The exhibition is called a national one, but the limitation applies strictly only to exhibitors, for contributory cats have come, though not, of course directly, from France, Italy, Norway. Prussia, Russia, Persia, and Siam, and this influx of foreigners might perhaps encourage the promoters in these days of international comparisons and competitions to endeavour to widen the area from which specimens of this apparently universal pet and inmate of civilized households are brought to these annual shows. To the sociologist such a collection would be interesting undoubtedly, for the domestication of the cat is, as any traveller in tropical wilds will agree, at least a safer test than the nearness of lemons of the civilization of a people.

What the effect of these annual shows may at no very distant time be upon the cat itself, it is not difficult to foresee. Already “sports” of nature are carefully stereotyped; the catalogue names “sires” and “dams” of some of the animals; the successes of others at previous shows at Sydenham and elsewhere throughout the country are chronicled, and we are evidently on the way to produce a race of pedigree cats whose genealogies will be duly recorded like those of famous racers, shire horses, shorthorns, St. Bernards, bull-dogs, pigeons, and other creatures which have become the care of the “fancier.” Incidentally, too, these exhibitions may possibly help to dissipate the notion that keeping cats is a weakness or a fondness peculiar to old maids, for the list of contributors shows that spinsters are not so many as one in six of those who have entered as competitors, or, to place the fact on record more exactly, single ladies form but 15.61 per cent, of the owners of the exhibitors.

With regard to the merits of the animals, their individuality of character in expression no less than in feature, form, and fur, the visitor is left to make his own observations unguided by any hints of the points to which the judges — Mr. Harrison Weir and his brother, Mr. J. Jenner Weir — have looked in making their awards. Perhaps it is best thus, but in the absence of an educated public taste in cats the popular verdict, as far as one could interpret it by the conversation occasionally to be heard in front of the cages, did not always coincide with that of the experts.

How intimately the undemonstrative but affectionate creatures are associated by their owners with the human members of the family appears from the prevalence of Christian names, and by nicknames — Kitty, Charley, Dick, Bill, Peter, Tom, Alice, Bess, Douglas, Polly, Lizzie, Flossy, Blanche appear in the catalogue again and again, and some 14 or 15 eats are entered under the name of Minnie. Traces of the wave of excitement which the sale of Jumbo caused appear in the entry of six or seven cats under his name, while one for whom the attainment to great size was, perhaps, not hoped is introduced as Jumbino.

Two curious little foreigners — Norwegian kittens of three months old, born in captivity — are shown, but not in competition, by Mrs. Carl Bock.

Medals were awarded to Mrs. Lee, of Penshurst (two) for Siamese cats, coloured not unlike a Japanese pug. Another well-shaped specimen of this race with a beautiful fur, Mrs. B. Johnson’s “Tom” had unfortunately been placed in the wrong class, a mischance which befell not a few others. A medal and first prize were awarded to Mrs. Quinnell, of Sydenham for two well-marked short-haired kittens, “Tom” and “Sarah;” to Mr. T. Rochester for a half-bred Persian, “Duke,” who won a second prize at the Crystal Palace in 1881; to Miss Batson, of South Norwood, for a Persian cat; and to Mrs. Wynell-Mayow, Braeside, Devizes, for twin Angora two-months-old kittens, “Pekin” and “Canton.” The show closes this evening.

* * *

IT IS NOT SUCH LADIES AS THESE that are wasting their time and affections on cats, otherwise they might be recommended to inspect the excellent cat show — the fifteenth of its kind — which has just been opened at the Crystal Palace. A very interesting and amusing account of this exhibition appeared in the Daily Telegraph, yesterday, from the pen of Mr. Phil Robinson, one of the most entertaining of writers on natural history, whose works, I believe, are well known in America, where he recently traveled. The collection at the Crystal Palace includes a number of very valuable animals, some of the kittens being sold for as much as $50 to $100 apiece, while on one superb tortoise-shell the fancy price of $50,000 has been placed by its adoring mistress, who, of course, would not part with it for any money. The judging of the show has been admirably done by Mr. Harrison Weir, the distingushed naturalist and animal painter; but the Crystal Palace authorities made a most unfortunate mistake in this matter. They first invited Mr. W. B. Tegetmeier, the editor of the natural history department of the ‘Field’, to act as judge, as he had done for many years before; but after he had accepted the engagement they suddenly discovered that ‘other arrengemt-nts’ had previously been made, and so Mr. Tegetmeier waa told that his services would not be required, and Mr. Harrison Weir was engaged, Naturally, some unpleasantness has arisen from this awkward blunder, which is not mitigated by the fact that the two eminent naturalists named do not exactly ‘hit it off.’ They are both, however, equally competent men, and Mr. Weir, at his charming place, Weir Leigh, near Tunbridge, which was built and laid out from his own designs, and Mr. Tegetmeier, at Finchley, in the north of Loudon, have made valuable natural history collections, from their study of which they have been enabled to give the public very profitable results. – The New York Times, October 30, 1883

NATIONAL CAT SHOW. South Wales Daily News, 17th October 1883
The 15th National Cat Show has been opened to-day at the Crystal Palace, and those who went to Sydenham for the exhibition had the pleasure of seeing nearly 350 specimens of this domestic pet. The prizes, although numerous, were not high from a monetary point of view, ranging from a sovereign to half-a-crown, but there were nine silver medals in addition, which were awarded to the best cats and kittens in the different classes. The prohibitory prices set upon some of the animals were a source of much amusement. One hundred pounds was a very common figure, while in one of the, classes there were two cats, each of which was priced at £10,000.

NATIONAL CAT SHOW AT THE CRYSTAL PALACE. London Daily News, 17th October 1883
The fifteenth National Cat Show was opened at the Crystal Palace yesterday; the number of entries of and the attendance of visitors alike testifying to the popularity of the exhibition. There were 50 classes and 333 entries, a considerable proportion of the latter being represented by cats belonging to working men. The entry list was closed on the 1st instant; but the cats were not received at the Palace until Monday evening, these continuing to arrive until eight o’clock yesterday morning. The judges were Lady Dorothy Nevill, Mr. Harrison Weir, and Mr. J. Jenner Weir; and their duties having been got through early in the afternoon, the show was thrown open to the public. Much interest was manifested in the various specimens, and so far as the kittens were concerned interest was to a large degree combined with amusement.

A charge varying from 1s to 3s 6d was made for each separate cat or each group collectively of kittens entered; but the animals were received for exhibition only on the express condition that the company would not be responsible for any loss or damage arising from accident or from any cause whatever – a reasonable stipulation enough when the fancy prices set upon some of the cats are taken into consideration. In class 13 – tortoiseshell and white – Mrs. E. Davies’s “Minnie,” age seven years, and the winner of the second prize at the Crystal Palace two years ago, was appraised at £10,000, a figure placed also upon the head of “Talley,” two years and six months, one of yesterday’s prize winners, and belonging to the same owner. Mrs. Jane Molyneux’s tortoiseshell and white “Peter” taking the first prize in his class was valued at £100; Mr. Hugh Mason’s spotted tabby, “Joe” (third prize), at a hundred guineas; and Mr. mason’s black “Witchet” (first prize), at a like figure.

In the Tortoiseshell Class Miss L. Hammon showed “Jenny Lind,” ten years old, and the winner of nine first and two second-class prizes; in the class also was Mrs. Molyneux’s “Polly” (third prize); these cats being valued at a hundred pounds each. In the Brown Tabby Class was Dr. W.D. Strang’s “Minnie” (third prize), secure from sale at £1,000, while the spotted tabbies included Mr. J.A. Willmott’s “Dolly,” the winner of first prizes at the Crystal Palace in 1881 and 1882, “Dolly” being now in the estimation of its possessor worth £1,000.

There was on class which comprised any variety of colour, and in this was Miss Hammond’s “Bob,” 11 years old, the winner of 17 first prizes, and which any admirer could have for £2,000, and Mr. W. Crole’s “Tommy,” which was not for sale at any price, these winning the first and second prizes respectively. Prohibitory figures, of which there were numerous other instances, were however not the order of the day, and a brisk sale was done at the office, where many a good cat was obtainable for five shillings. The prizes varied from a sovereign to 2s 6d, but in addition to the money awards nine silver medals were given away, six to the best cat in the various classes, and three to the best pairs of kittens. The exhibition, which is held within the Palace, will remain open until six o’clock this evening.

CRYSTAL PALACE CAT SHOW. Western Gazette, 19th October, 1883
At the Crystal Palace Cat Show, on Tuesday, Mrs. Wynell-Mayo, Braeside, Devizes, was awarded a medal and first prize for twin Angora two-months-old kitten, “Pekin” and “Canton.”

CRYSTAL PALACE CAT SHOW. Morning Post, 17th October 1883
Having reached its 15th anniversary, the National Cat Show, which opened at the Crystal Palace yesterday, may now be considered to occupy a permanent position among the yearly exhibitions of the metropolis. Just as there are some people who are ready to deny the "sweetness and light" of the Grosvenor Gallery, and who regard the yearly tour through the apartments of Burlington House as an infliction, none the less severe because it is borne in silence, so, no doubt a class exists to whom cats — even the prize-winners of Sydenham - have no charm. Much, probably, depends upon early associations and former experiences of the feline tribe. But if cats have their detractors they have their admirers, too; ardent admirers who anticipate the national feline festival with the utmost interest, and who pass from cage to cage scanning with practised eyes the "points" of the animals exhibited, and detecting defects and beauties where the casual visitor sees them not.

The solicitude for the comfort of puss on occasions like these is touching. The cats, though subjected to an unaccustomed restraint in cages, are in other respects treated more as princes than prisoners. Reclining lazily on soft cushions, and lapping at their leisure from saucers of milk, they are masters and mistresses of the situation, and the ever-changing panorama of humanity which passes before them is there on sufferance. They appear to take but a languid interest in what goes on, and the novel surroundings are apt to play little tricks with feline tempers, which amid home surroundings, are no doubt gentle enough. They resent the advances of strangers in a way but to be expected from cats idolised and made much of in well- ordered households.

"Why," they probably ask themselves, "should they scrape casual acquaintances when there are agreeable little 'sets' in which they are welcome';" And so, instead of scraping these acquaintances, they scratch them, or endeavour to do so, when a favourable opportunity presents itself. The promoters of the show, it may be assumed, are well acquainted with the feelings of probable exhibitors, and they have, therefore, framed a rule which enables exhibitors to take home their cats each day after the show on deposit of £1, which sum is forfeited should the cats not be returned by nine o'clock the following morning.

Some of the "reserve" prices are curiously instructive. They are indeed "fancy" prices, ranging from £1 or £1 10s up to £10,000; but it is worth noting that the animals which are the most highly prized by their owners do not invariably find the most favour in the eyes of the judges — Lady Dorothy Nevill, Mr. Harrison Weir, the well-known artist of animal life, and Mr. J. Jenner Weir, fellow of the Zoological Society. For instance, in the class for tortoiseshell and white cats, there were two animals valued by their owner at £10,000, but the first prize fell to a cat (a prize-winner last year) whose owner modestly marked the price at 45s.

The entries altogether reached the symmetrical total of 333, and were divided into 50 classes, covering the wide field of tortoiseshells, brown, blue, silver, red and spotted tabbies, black, white, Manx, long-haired and short-haired cats, with special classes for kittens and for cats belonging to working men. Nine silver medals, distinct from and in addition to the liberal prize list, were offered by the Crystal Palace Company, and were awarded as under : — Mrs. Lee, Penshurst, Kent, for an imported Siamese cat, 4 years; and the same lady for another Siamese cat, 5 years; Mrs. Quinnell, Sydenham, for two well-marked, short-haired kittens, 3 months; Mr. T. Rochester, Laurie Park, Sydenham, for Duke, a half-bred Persian, the winner of a second prize at the Crystal Palace in 1881; Miss Batson, South Norwood, for Purr, a Persian, 6 years; Mrs. Wynell-Mayow, Devizes, for two Angora kittens, 2 months; Mrs. Spinks, Belsize-square, for Gelah, a Siamese cat, 1 year and 3 months : Mrs. Mayhew, South Norwood, for Charlie, a long-haired cat, just over 1 year; and Mr. E. Durman, Norwood-road, for the best cat in the working men's classes.

In the class for black cats, Zulu, 2 years, attracted much attention on account of her two snow-white kittens, but she was not awarded a prize. There were but two entries in the class for weight only, and here the first prize was awarded to Bob, a veteran of 11 years, the property of Miss L. Hammond, of Lower Streatham. He has the appearance of being an even-tempered and affable monster, and bears his weight, 161b., and his blushing honours, 17 - now increased to 18 - first prizes, modestly. His reserve price, it may be stated for the benefit of intending purchasers, is £2,000. The show remains open until this evening.

CRYSTAL PALACE CAT SHOW. Birmingham Daily Post, 19th October 1883
But hie [go] we next to the Cat Show at the Crystal Palace. Here we shall find company more choice perhaps, but far less interesting than at the Brewers. The visitors to the Cat Show consist principally of elderly spinsters and their widowed sisters. Few are of the fashionable class. They are, for the most part, dowdily attired, and bear with them a sad and depressed aspect, as though too much association with their feline pets and companions had impressed them with the same silent care as that which is remarked is a trait of the cat character - a watchful anxiety, as if is ever on the alert lest is mouse should escape; and yet, when roused to cheerfulness, manifesting a disposition to play, when even in mature age, with all the frolicsome naiveté of the kitten.

The Cat Show is one of the most characteristic sights of London, and well worth the attention of the visitor from the provinces. The specimens this year are all of the choicest kind - well-to-do cats - no gutter varieties whatever. The least presuming is the comfortable bourgeois household cat, who carries the catalogue of her domestic virtues written in her face, and sits comfortably purring against the bars of her cage, with her offspring gambolling around her. She beholds the bargains entered into for the sale of her kittens, with the same contented purr as that which greets their frolicsome play and the lively experiments they continually make upon her tail and ears. The kittens of "warranted good mousers" have realised capital prices this year, for not only have we been visited by of daddy-longlegs, but with a plague of mice as well, supposed to have been let loose upon us by the knocking down of so many old tenements and the clearing away of so much rubbish.

We miss, however, one or two of the old stagers who have figured for some years past at the Crystal Palace, placed there, so it has always been supposed, rather as a lure than in view of a serious bid, with their fancy prices and their romantic stories, told in round-hand on the card appended to their dens. What is gone with "Old Tom" - the male tortoiseshell marked at 1,000 guineas? Where is "Minette" - who had been boarded up for three weeks, literally floored by the carpenter beneath the planks of a cupboard at Bedenham? We never heard of any individual having bid for "Old Tom," nor yet of anyone who could vouch for the truth concerning the adventure of "Minette," but we miss them all the same. "Peter," the substitute for "Old Tom," does not touch our hearts as did our old favourite. There is a mixture of white in his coat which mars the majestic effect of the dark and light brown before which we used to stand in awe and reverence. "Peter," however, has carried the day, and is greatly admired by those who know no better. The affectation of pricing "Minnie," who won the second prize two years ago, at £10,000, is a sorry joke indeed.

Moncrieffe, the amiable French philosopher, who wrote a famous essay on Cats, declares "that they are far superior to men, inasmuch as they maintain silence, and suffer not their feelings to become visible to the world, but are always enabled to control their emotion." The absolute absence of all interest in life, save that which concerns themselves, becomes strikingly visible at the show. The weather had been fine up to a certain hour of the day, when the sudden pattering of the rails upon the glass dome of the palace caused the whole company of cats to jump up with one accord, and with the same measured glance of suspicion to look about them, and then, evidently actuated by the same feeling that it was no business of theirs, to turn round and fall to sleep again with the same unconcern as before. But although the cat is a curious study, it will always be a puzzle to the observer to account for the vast crowds who annually attend the show.

THE CAT SHOW. East & South Devon Advertiser, 20th October 1883
The fifteenth National Cat Show at the Crystal Palace presented an interesting collection of feline pets. The accessories of the exhibition were suggestive of the luxury and comfort of which Pussy is proverbially so fond. The show occupied considerable part of the nave of the palace under an awning decorated with trophies of flags. The c were arranged in cages on either side of two parallel avenues. Many of the sleek purring creatures were provided by their owners with cushions, some of coloured satin, on which to recline; and in the front part of all the cages was a sort of platform, covered with red baize, on which Pussy might stand and be caressed and be admired of all. In one corner of each compartment a platter of creamy milk was available to quench the feline thirst.

Both longhaired and short-haired cats were on view, and as to colour, there were tortoiseshell, tortoiseshell and white, brown tabby, brown tabby and white, blue or silver tabby, red tabby or red tabby and white, spotted tabby, black and white, black alone and white alone. The entries numbered 333, distributed into fifty classes, several of which were for cats belonging to working men. In addition to the three prizes given in each class — in amounts of one sovereign, ten and five shillings respectively - the Crystal Palace Company awarded nine silver medals to the best of groups of classes.

The judging was done by Lady Dorothy Nevill. Mr. Harrison Weir, and Mr. J. Jenner Weir, F.Z.S. The two silver medals for the best male and the best female short-haired cats were both won by Mrs. Lee, in respect of two imported Siamese cats, one aged four, and the other five years. These Asiatic cats, with their black faces, sleeping-looking violet eyes, and fawn-coloured bodies, lying upon light blue satin cushions, attracted not a little attention. Some of the long-haired cats were very fine specimens of their kind. The silver medal for the best he-cat in this division was awarded to Mr. T. Rochester for a half-bred Persian “Duke,” aged I two years and six months — a prize-winner in 1881. A Persian cat. “Purr,” aged six years, belonging Miss Bateson, took the silver medal among the she-cats of this class. Mrs. Spinks’s Siamese “Gelah,” one year and three months, and Mrs. Mayhew’s cat “Charlie,” a year and a month (prize-winner as a kitten last year) also received silver medals.

Among working men’s cat, Mr. E. Durham’s “Tow,” a twelvemonth old, achieved the honour of the silver medal. There is an excellent display of kittens, eager for fun and frolic with the visitors. Two silver medals were given for kittens. One, for the two best marked kittens, short-haired, any colour, and under six months, was won Mrs. Quinnell’s “Tom” and “Sarah,” aged three months. The other medal, for the two choicest long-haired kittens, fell to the lot of Mrs. Wynell-Mayow’s Angora “Pekin” and “Canton,” two months old. Amongst the cats that attracted attention may be mentioned one named “Zulu,” which was jet black all over, with two perfectly white kittens. A fat red tabby, named “Bob,” was much caressed. It was announced that though had attained the advanced age of 11 years, he could turn the scale for 16 lb. He was ticketed as the winner of 17 first prizes, and Miss L. Hammond, the owner, annexed to him the fancy value of £2000. Another favourite was a white Persian, “Mistletoe,” reclining in most luxurious manner on a light blue cushion, veteran of 13 years, and the proud winner of 40 first and 16 special prizes. A tabby long-haired cat, named “Pompey,” three years old, made himself conspicuous looking steadfastly upward for several minutes at time, and then gnashing his teeth and whining piteous manner. Speculation was rife as whether this was grief at being away from home and amid strange surroundings. But the conclusion ultimately come to by the observing was, that it all arose from chagrin at not able to get at some flies that occasionally settled outside the bars overhead. This was no doubt a cat of sporting proclivities — one that would make short work of a rat.

A terrible example of the soporific effect of gluttony was “Feedie,*’ an English brown tabby of six summers, which sported in front of his neck a large amber-coloured bow. This fat beast sat up near the bars of its compartment asleep, with an expression on his face suggestive of comfort within. Desperate efforts were made by several ladies to arouse this creature to a consciousness of the presence visitors, but it was of no avail. If stroked, took no notice; if pushed, he returned his equilibrium; if his paw were taken, it dropped listlessly as soon as released. Through it all “Feedie” slept on, taking no notice of anybody. This cat presented striking contrast to others whose highly sensitive nervous organisation was evinced in their susceptibility to the least attention.

Mrs. Carl Brook exhibited two pure-bred Norwegian kittens, bluish-black in colour, three months old — “Punch and Judy” by name. The judging was concluded by one p.m., after which the general public were admitted. The avenues of the show were thronged all the afternoon, and, later on, a large number children being among the visitors.

cat show

CAT SHOW AT THE CRYSTAL PALACE. South London Press, 20th October 1883
The 15th annual National Cat Show was held at the Crystal Palace on Tuesday and Wednesday. The show was admirably worked by Mr. G. S. Venables, of the Crystal Palace staff, whose efforts were crowned with the greatest success, there being nearly double the number of entries this year, the number being 333, while last year they only reached 169. A large amount of business was also done in the sales department. The show was arranged in the north nave, under canvas, and was patronized by large numbers of visitors on both days. Nearly every variety of cat was represented, there being some beautiful specimens of English, Persian, Siamese, Manx, etc., exhibited. The judges were Lady Dorothy Nevill, Mr. Harrison Weir, F.R.H.S., and Mr. J. Jenner Weir, F.Z.S., . The following is a complete list of South London prize-takers, and those whose cats received favourable mention:

Miss Kate Aldrich, Keston Lodge, Tavistock-road, Croydon, highly commended in Class 32.
Mr. J. Allbone, 1, Spring Villas, Apsley-road, South Norwood, very highly commended in Class 36.
Mrs. Andrews, 3, Furze-road, New Thornton Heath, commended in Class 15.
Mrs. G. F. Baldwin, 8, The Limes, Moffatt-road, New Thornton Heath, 2nd in Class 25.
Mrs. E. Bannister, 78, Newington Causeway, very highly commended in Class 37.
Mrs. Bates, 9, Victoria Cottages, Upper Norwood, very highly commended in Class 47.
Miss Batson, 2, Folkestone Villas, Dagnall Park, South Norwood, 1st and Silver Medal in Class 31.
Mrs. Binches, Hillside, Overhill-road, Forest Hill, 2nd, Class 8.
Mr. W. S. Bloxham, 3, Terrace, High-road, Lee, 2nd, Class 41.
Mr. E. Board, Bird-in-Hand Bridge, Sydenham-road, Croydon, very highly commended in Class 44.
Mrs. Ann Bowyer, 1, Prospect-road, Wells-road, Sydenham, very highly commended in Class 45.
Mr. R. J. Bradford, 12, Woodside Terrace, Gipsy Hill, highly commended in Class 3.
Mr. W. J. Brookes, 137, Westminster Bridge-road, Lambeth, 1st, Class 36.
Mr, George Brown, 1, Allen Terrace, Berridge-road, Gipsy Hill, very highly commended in Class 48.
Mrs. Brunton, Iona, The Avenue, Gipsy Hill, commended in Class 15.
Mr. H. Burtenshaw, 2, Chestnut Cottages, Benton’s-lane, Lower Norwood, 1st, Class 28.
Mrs. E. Burton, Alexandra, Kirkdale, Sydenham, 2nd, Class 15.
Mr. E. Camp, 9, Wordsworth-road, Penge, 1st, Class 46.
Mrs. Carter, Cottage of Content, Wells-road, Sydenham, 3rd, Class 36.
Mrs. J. Challis, 21, Laurie Grove, New Cross, 2nd, Class 39.
Mr. V. Clutten, 51, Loughborough-road, Brixton, 1st, Class 9.
Mr. W. Crole, 73, Belvedere-road, Upper Norwood, 2nd, Class 33.
Mr. F. G. Crutch, 11, Grosvenor-road, South Norwood, 2nd, Class 2.
Mrs. Darling, 1, Nash’s Cottages, New Town, Norwood, very highly commended in Class 44.
Mrs. E. Davies, Braemar, Carson-road, West Dulwich, 3rd, Class 13.
Miss A. Dickenson, 13, Victoria Cottages, Woodland-road, Norwood, 1st, Class 6.
Mrs. Donkin, Fir Croft, Beulah Hill, Upper Norwood, highly commended in Class 34, and 2nd in Class 36.
Mrs. Dorman, 1, Chatham Terrace, Upper Norwood, 3rd, Class 15.
Mr. E. Durman, 425, Norwood-road, Norwood, 1st, Class 41.
Mr. J. Edwards, 65, Camplin-street, Hatcham Park, New Cross, 1st, Class 48.
Mrs. Elcome, 4, Chestnut Villas, Woodland-road, Norwood, 2nd, Class 46.
Mrs. Ellis, Trelawn, Garlies-road, Forest Hill, 2nd, Class 10.
Mr. W. Fisher, 6, Plummer’s Cottages, Upper Norwood, 2nd, Class 42.
Mrs. J. F. Flannery, Mornington Cottage, Crown Hill, Norwood, 3rd, Class 32.
Mrs. Fosbery, Malton Villas, Crystal Palace-road, Lordship-lane, commended in Class 12.
Mrs. Fossett, Sylverton Villas, 53, Hamilton-road, Lower Norwood, 1st, Class 19.
Mr. J. Fossett, Sylverton Villas, 53, Hamilton-road, Lower Norwood, 2nd, Class 19.
Mr. C. Fossett, Sylverton Villas, 53, Hamilton-road, Lower Norwood, 3rd, Class 2.
Mr. Foulkes, 27, Anerley Vale, Anerley, highly commended in Class 47.
Miss S. Fowkes, Orgham Cottage, Kingswood-road, Penge, very highly commended in Class 8.
Mr. E. Giblin, Acacia Villa, Birkbeck-road, Beckenham, very highly commended in Class 48.
E. Gomer, Crystal Palace, 2nd, Class 4.
Mr. J. Gould, 5, Champness Terrace, Clive-road, Lower Norwood, 1st, Class 49.
Mr. T. Gower, 3, Station-road, Herne Hill, very highly commended in Class 30.
Mr. W. Graty, Springfield, near Herne Hill station, very highly commended in Class 48.
Mrs. C. S. Hallum, Farley Villas, Farley-road, South Norwood, 3rd, and highly commended in Class 3.
Miss L. Hammond, Streatham Lodge, Lower Streatham, 1st Class 33.
Mrs. Harding, 19, St. Aubyn's-road, Upper Norwood, very highly commended in Class 34.
Mr. George Head, Westow Hill, 2nd, Class 37.
Mr. Heard, 3, Surrey Cottages, Farley-road, South Norwood, very highly commended in Class 13.
Miss Heron, 4, Hillside Terrace, Upper Norwood, 1st, Class 7.
Mr. E. Higbid, Lower Engine House, Crystal Palace, very highly commended in Class 46.
Miss M, Hills, 80, Hamilton-road, Lower Norwood, very highly commended in Class 48.
Mrs. Hyde, The Cottage, Honor Oak Park, very highly commended in Class 31.
Miss G. Hyde, The Cottage, Honor Oak Park, very highly commended Class 31.
Miss D. Jerome, 2, Devonshire Cottage, Woodland-road, Upper Norwood, highly commended in Class 46.
Mrs. C. Johnson, 47, Colby-road, Norwood, very highly commended in Class 44.
Mr. Johnson, 47, Colby-road, Norwood, very highly commended in Class 46, and 2nd in Class 47.
Master H. Johnson, 47, Colby-road, Norwood, commanded in Class 2.
Mr. W. King, 8, Hadlow-place, Anerley-road, 1st, Class 45.
Mr. King, 8, Hadlow-place, Anerley-road, 2nd, Class 3.
Mr. H. Kingston, Lyham-road, Brixton Hill, 2nd, Class 45.
Mr. H. Laflin, 195, Norwood-road, Lower Norwood, very highly commended in Class 34.
Mr. C. Lambirth, 2, Royal Terrace, Wcstow Hill, very highly commended in Class 47.
Mrs. G, Leadbetter, 82, Ridsdale-road, Anerley, 2nd, Class 48.
Mrs. W. Letts, Osborne-road, New Thornton Heath, very highly commended in Class 45.
Mrs. B. Martin, 5, Spa Hill, Upper Norwood, highly commended Class 47.
Mrs. Mayhew, Melrose House, Selhurst-road, South-Norwood, 2nd, Class 29, 2nd, Class 38; and 1st, Class 41.
Mrs. E. Moore, St. Norman’s, Anerley, 1st, Class 26.
Mrs. M. Moss, 12, Farquhar Terrace, Upper Norwood, 3rd, Class 39.
Mrs. M. A. Newton, Woolsthorpe, Gipsy Hill, commended and very highly commended in Class 17.
Miss Page, General Jackson, Oakfield-road, Penge, 1st, 17.
Mrs. H. Page, 1, Hawthorne Grove, Penge, very highly commended in Class 48.
Miss Payne, 1, Tullett’s-yard, Westow Hill, Norwood, very highly commended in Class 44.
Miss M. Pettitt, Farley Villas, Farley-road, South Norwood, 2nd, Class 14.
Mrs. G. Pretty, 143, Hamilton-road, Lower Norwood, 1st, Class 47.
Mrs. Quinnell, 30, Coombe-road, Sydenham, 1st, and silver medal in Class 23.
Mr. T. Rochester, Southwood, Laurie Park, Sydenham, 1st and silver medal in Class 24, and 3rd in Class 30.
Mrs. J. Ruffles, 10, Atlantic-road, Brixton, very highly commended in Class 45.
Miss Scott, Oaklands, Alleyn Park, West Dulwich, commended in Class 3.
Dr. W. D. Strang, 13, Queen Adelaide-road, Penge, 3rd, Class 14.
Miss Strange, Westow Hill, Upper Norwood, 3rd, Class 20.
W. Strange, Westow Hill, Upper Norwood, 2nd, Class 17.
Mr. W. Street, 40 Counter, Crystal Palace, 2nd, Class 13.
Mr. W. Sumner, Ardwell, College-road, Upper Norwood, 1st, Class 39.
Mr. H. Swinyard, 3, St. John’s Villas. Romaany-road, Lower Norwood, 1st in Class 20, and 2nd in Class 30.
Mrs. Cresswell Tayleur, 6, Woodfield Villas, Streatham Hill, 3rd, Class 31.
Mr. H. A. Thomas, 2, Royal Terrace, Upper Norwood, very highly commended in Class 47.
Mrs. Townsend, 12, Albert Cottages, Princess-road, Croydon, commended in Class 2.
Mrs. Treadaway, 80, Cemetery-road, Croydon, very highly commended in Class 44.
Mr. J. Trusson, 80, Cemetery-road, Croydon, 1st and 2nd in Class 18, and 1st in Class 12.
Mrs. Tullett, Westow Hill, Upper Norwood, highly commended in Class 2.
Mrs. Geo. Tullett, 39, Dale Terrace, St. Hughes-road, Anerley, 2nd, Class 5.
Mrs. Vaughan, 15, Portland Terrace, Woodland Hill, Upper Norwood, highly commended Class 49.
Mr. J. Ward, 5, Zion Villas, New Thornton Heath, very highly commended in Class 41.
Mrs. Weekley. 5, Marlborough-street, Blackfriars-road, 3rd, Class 24, very highly commended in Class 30, and very highly commended in Class 32.
Mr. John Weightman, 10, Elmira-street, Lewisham, Kent, 2nd, Class 31.
Mr. E. J. Wells, 45, Camden Hill-road, Upper Norwood, 3rd, Class 49.
Mr. W. Wells, 14, Crescent-road, Holmesdale-road, Croydon, very highly commended in Class 48.
Mrs. West, 6, College Terrace, College-street, Gipsy Hill, very highly commended in Class 44.
Mrs. A. White, 1, Bon Marche Terrace, Gipsy-road, Upper Norwood, commended in Class 23.
Mr. A. Williams, 1, Melrose Cottages, Hanover-street, Sydenham, very highly commended in Class 48.
Mr. J. Williams, Penlee House, 211, Brockley-road, New Cross, 2nd, Class 40.
Miss Wilkinson, 31, Versailles-road, Anerley, commended in Class 13.
Mrs. Willmott, Oakley House, 209, Brockley-road, Brockley, 1st, Class 2.
Mr. J.A. Willmott, Oakley House, 209, Brockley-road, Brockley, 3rd, Class 17, and very highly commended in Class 23.
Mr. E. Wise, Grosvenor Lodge, Colby-road, Gipsy Hill, very highly commended in Class 48.
Mrs. E. Wiseman, 22 Clifton Terrace, Old Penge-lane, 3rd, Class 48.
Mr. E.J. Wright, 106 and 108, High-street, Clapham, 2nd, Class 28, and very highly commended in Class 32.

THE CRYSTAL PALACE CAT SHOW Oxford Times, 27th October 1883
Mr. Joseph Hill, 1, Warborough Villas, Grandpont-road, was awarded 1st prize for a long-haired cat, and also commended for a short-haired tortoiseshell and white.

THE CRYSTAL PALACE CAT SHOW. Illustrated Sporting and Dramatic News, 27th October 1883
Good management and excellent and numerous entries have stamped this show as one of the finest that has ever been held. Probably of the many shows that are held annually at the Palace not one can vie with the present in the extraordinary amount of intelligent interest shown in the animals by the visitors. Everybody has a good word to say for poor puss, despite the bad name given to his family. For ages this has been his right, and the popularity of other animals has failed to usurp his place, therefore it was not astonishing to hear the extravagant terms of endearment bestowed upon him. The delight of the children, the madness personified of the ladies of certain and uncertain ages, was warmly expressed, and every cat, from the ten thousand pounder to the humble three shillinger, was befittingly idolised.

Of grumblers among the exhibitors there were plenty to spare in some few cases there does seem ground for discontent, as it is rather hard for an animal to be disqualified in the same class that it had gained prizes for in previous years. Some twenty-five exhibits were disqualified, most of them very good in form, colour, and coat. They would have made hard fights of it in the prize list.

Mr. W. Luke Evans's Blackie was for all the world like a “bred and born Christian," as a lady observed. To quote the catalogue, "This cat sits up and begs like a dog when asked by a child to kiss he rubs his head round the child's face. He gives his paw when asked to shake hands." Probably he has never been asked to kiss and shake hands so many times in a single day before in his life. Provokingly entered in a wrong class, he was disqualified, although he gained three prizes in 1880 and 1882 in a similar class. Mr. G. Edson's long-haired kitten, a charming little fellow, was snapped up, a bargain, at his catalogue price. Mr. E. J. Wright's Spot and Spotless, long-haired silver kittens, very highly commended, ran near the prize takers. The same gentleman's silver Persian. Hermione, with a splendid large frill, took second in her class Mr. J. Hill's long-haired unapproachable tabby Dick took first in his class, is the winner also of six firsts, one second, special, and silver medal. Other prizetakers are marked in the illustrations. The judges were Lady Dorothy Neville and Messrs. Harrison Weir and Jenner Weir.

THE CRYSTAL PALACE CAT SHOW. Illustrated London News, 27th October 1883
Our Artist has exercised his wonted comic fancy in delineating some incidents this popular exhibition, held for the fifteenth time on Tuesday and Wednesday of last week. It is styled National,” but might almost claim to be regarded as “International,” seeing that cats from Germany, France, Italy, Norway, and Russia, course from Angora and Persia, and even from Siam, find their way to the stands, well as from all parts of Great Britain. The two Siamese cats belonging to Mrs. Lee, of Penshurst, which gained medal, were regarded with much curiosity. To the lady visitors, young and old, the Cat Show proved especially attractive, and some of the fair enthusiasts have been caught on the point of our Artist’s pencil.

1883 LOCAL CAT SHOWS

TENBY DOG, POULTRY, PIGEON, RABBIT AND CAT SHOW. South Wales Daily News, 30TH June 1883
Tenby Dog, Poultry, Pigeon, Rabbit and Cat Show will be held in the Skating Rink, Tenby (covered-in building), on Wednesday, August 22nd, 1883. Liberal prize list. Entries close August 7th, 1883. Prize list and entry forms on application to Chas. Farley, Hon. Secretary, Tenby.

COTTAGE GARDEN SHOW AT COLD ASH. Reading Mercury, 18th August 1883
One of the best cottage garden shows in the county is that annually held at Cold Ash, near Newbury, [. . .] in addition to the established cat show there was an exhibition of donkeys. [. . .] There were five entries for the donkey prizes and a large number for the cats. [Prizes:] Cats. – l, Mrs. Wallen, 2 Mrs. Piper.

THE DUNDEE DOG AND CAT SHOW. Dundee Advertiser, 28th August 1883
To the Editor of the Dundee Advertiser. Sir. – I am sure everyone who takes an interest in matters relating to the canine and feline tribes must have been greatly pleased to notice from the preliminary advertisement which appeared in your columns the other day that the long-spoken of Dundee dog and cat show is likely soon become a fait accompli. From the information I have been able to obtain I am led to believe that this year’s exhibition will, all appearance, be one of the largest and most attractive yet held in this town. Those to whom belong the credit of getting up the show are, for the most part, gentlemen of good social position, and who, as ardent and true lovers of the dog, are desirous, and that alone, to maintain the breeds, and, if possible, to get every man and woman to take an increased interest in and have a more humane regard for those most useful, affectionate, and domestic pets —our dogs and cats. In order that the Dundee dog and cat show may not only surpass anything of its kind hitherto held in this quarter, but that it may be the best ever held this side of the Tweed, it only remains with the gentry, the landed proprietors, and dog fanciers in and around Dundee handsomely to subscribe either in money or plate to the funds of the show. — I am, etc., BLACK AND TAN.

OXFORD POULTRY, PIGEON, RABBIT, CANARY, AND CAT SHOW. Banbury Guardian, 13th September 1883
County of Oxford Poultry, Pigeon, Rabbit, Canary, and Cat Show will be held at Banbury on October 30th and 31st, 1883. .

DUNDEE DOG AND CAT SHOW. Dundee Advertiser, 13th September 1883
A dog and cat show on large scale will be held in Dundee about the middle of November next. In the early part of this year occurred to the son of a prominent citizen that if he could arouse the enthusiasm and secure the aid of some of his friends, and of gentlemen of standing in Dundee and the surrounding neighbourhood, he might do a good thing reviving and establishing, under entirely new and enlightened auspices, an exhibition which, for some unaccountable reason, has been allowed to lapse, and which, as an educative and humanising influence, ought to be an annual institution in the town. [. . .] From the fact that the Earl of Dalhousie is an Honorary President, that the Patrons are men of high standing in their respective districts, and that several cups and liberal money prizes are to be offered for competition, the Dundee Dog and Cat Show for 1883 should excel all exhibitions the kind hitherto held in this quarter.

RIPLEY POULTRY AND CAT SHOW. Nottinghamshire Guardian, 26th October 1883
The third annual exhibition under the auspices of the Ripley Fanciers’ Association was held on Tuesday in the Public Hall, Ripley. [. . .] A novelty in connection with the show was a class for the exhibition of cats, and a very interest section I proved to be. One of the cats shown was a successful prize taker at the recent exhibition at the Crystal Palace, London.
[Prize list]
Class 30 – Long-haired – 2, special and very highly commended, Thomas Elison, The Bank, Spalding; 3, W.C.O. Ellis, Combe Down, Bath.
Class 31 – Short-haired tabby or tabby and white – 2, John Redfern, Doncaster; 3, William Beebe, The Mount, Bakewell.
Class 32 – Short-haired, any colour – 1, and special, Samuel Bucknall, Bakewell; 2, F.A. Dorrington, “Minnie;” 3, William Robinson.
Class 33 – Kitten, any variety, any colour – 1, special, and 3, Mrs. Bridges, Cheltenham; 2, W.C.O. Ellis.

POULTRY, PIGEON, RABBIT, CAGE BIRD, AND CAT SHOW. Banbury Advertiser, 1st November 1883
The annual exhibition of what has now become the County of Oxford Poultry, Pigeon, Rabbit, Cage Bird, and Cat Society was held on Wednesday, at the Exchange Hall, Banbury, and was one of the best displays ever seen in this part of the country. Upwards of £170 and ten silver cups were offered in prizes, and this brought forward over 900 entries from about 350 fanciers in all parts of the kingdom. The exhibits were stated in pens belonging to Mr G. Billett, of Southampton, and left none too much room for the visitors. [Prize list] Cats (Confined to a radius of five miles from Banbury)
Class 84 – Long-haired, male or female – 1, Miss K. Douglas, Banbury; 2, Mr. F. George, Farthinghoe; 3, Mr. W. Rogers, Banbury.
Class 85 – Short-haired, male or female – 1, Mrs. Prince, Banbury; 2, Mrs. Sharman, Grimsbury; 3, Mr. C. Hitchcox; v.h.c. Mr. Thorp, Banbury; h.c Miss Page.
Class 86 – Kitten, any variety, any age, not to exceed six months – 1, Mr. G. Jones, Banbury; 2, Mr. G. Griffin, Spittal Farm, Banbury; 3, Mr. R. Neale, Banbury; c. Mr. H. Simmonds, Banbury.

THE DUNDEE DOG AND CAT SHOW. Dundee Advertiser, 15th November 1883
The Dundee Dog and Cat Show opens today in the Drill Hall. The hall has been fitted up in a similar manner to that adopted on the occasion of the last dog show, several years ago. [. . .] The small hall to the north will be devoted to the exhibition of cats. These will be shown in pens, and special care is to be taken that while being easily seen by visitors they shall not be interfered with. Some fine animals have been entered – among others one or two Persian cats that have taken prizes at the Crystal Palace Shows. The exhibition will be opened at ten o’clock. The judges are Mr. Peter Eden, Salford; Mr. James Taylor, Rochdale; and Mr. James B. Morrison, Greenock.

DUNDEE DOG AND CAT SHOW. Dundee Courier, 16th November 1883
The Association formed Dundee, with the Earl of Dalhousie and Admiral Dougall as its honorary presidents, for the purpose of holding annually an exhibition of sporting and other dogs and cats, and thus to lead to the improvement and perfection the breeds, must be congratulated on their first show, which is now being held in the Drill Hall. In point of numbers and quality, the arrangements for the exhibition and comfort of the animals, and for the convenience of the public, those who acted as judges declare that the exhibition is equal to any that has been held in Scotland for many years, while it also compares favourably with more pretentious gatherings of the kind in England. [. . .] 5 classes of cats, comprising 35 entries. The disposition of the different classes, and the provision made for the comfort of the exhibits, not only evince great regard for the health of the animals, but admirable judgment. [. . .] The show of cats, though not extensive, was of high merit, and attracted much attention. [Prizes]

Cats. Toms — Common - l, James C. Dewar, Airlie Arms Hotel, Kirriemuir; 2, Thomas Bowie, Alloa; 3, George Johnston, High Street, Portobello; h.c., M. Clark, Pitfour Street Dundee.
Tabbies [i.e. females] — l, J. W. Kidd, Ann Street, Dundee; 2, James Mill, Newbigging; 3, C. Calner, Newport; v.h.c. John Robb, Campbellton Place, Hawkhiil.
Toms (any other variety) — l, Mrs Frew,Kirkcaldy; 2, Tom Ellsum, Spalding (Persian cat); 3, John L. Luke, West Ferry. Tabbies (any other variety) — 1, Miss Robina Frew, Kirkcaldy; 2, Sir John Kinloch, Bart.; 3, J. L. Luke.
Kittens (any variety) – 1, Miss Milne, Mount Mourant[?], Dundee; 2, Miss Rachel Frew, Kirkcaldy; 3, William Davidson, Tay Street, Dundee.

THE FORTHCOMING CAT AND DOG SHOW. Liverpool Mercury, 6th December 1883
To The Editors of the Liverpool Mercury. Gentlemen,- Might I suggest to the committee of above show, through your influential columns, that they would have the goodness to offer a small in cup or other suitable presentation in the cat department of the show, apart from the money prizes? This could be offered for general competition, and be awarded to the best cat in the two classes, similar to the way dogs compete; or two special prizes might be given for the best cat in each of the two classes, or in any other way that the committee should think proper. In Dublin, at a cat show held in December, 1881, the judges picked out a cat from nearly 200 entries as being "the best cat in the show," and had the cage ticketed accordingly; and this could be done anywhere else with good effect if some special reward was offered. It goes almost without saying that in a city like Liverpool some very fine and handsome animals will be exhibited, and it would greatly encourage owners of valuable specimens to enter the lists if this suggestion were acted on. I am sure that those who possess well-bred members of the feline tribe must feel themselves left out in the cold when they see all the "tit-bits” set apart for the more lucky proprietors of the canine breed, while the former, perhaps, set as high store on their pets as do owners of the latter. And if the "tabbies" could only talk, they would be sure to tell the committee that they felt as much entitled to compete for a cup as their more lauded "doggie" confreres. I feel certain that this matter needs only to be brought prominently before the notice of the committee to receive a favourable consideration, and that subscriptions would come in from the public to start a cup if the authorities do not see their way to bear the expense. S.A. Martin. 28, Laurel-road, Fairfield, Liverpool.

POULTRY, SONG-BIRD, AND CAT SHOW. Derbyshire Advertiser and Journal, 28th December 1883
A show of poultry, pigeons, song birds, and cats, was opened on Monday at what is known as the “New Crystal Palace,” forming part of the premises of the White Lion Inn, Marlpool. This show is the first held at that place, and may be regarded as very encouraging as a commencement. There was a fair number of entries, and considerable interest was evinced in the exhibits. The judges were Mr. J. Crossland, of Wakefield, and Mr. Joseph Bexon, of Derby.

MARLPOOL (HEANOR) POULTRY, SONG-BIRD, RABBIT, AND CAT SHOW. [1883] Derby Mercury, 2nd January 1884
A show of poultry, pigeons, song-birds, rabbits, and cats was opened on Dec. 24, at what is known as the "New Crystal Palace," forming part of the premises of the White Lion Inn, Marlpool, near Heanor. The show was the first that had been held at that place, and may be regarded as a very encouraging commencement. There were upwards of 150 entries, and considerable interest was manifested in the exhibition. The show remained open on the Tuesday and Wednesday following. The judges were Mr. J. Crossland, of Wakefield, and Mr. Bexson, of Derby.

MESSYBEAST.COM HISTORY INDEX

You are visitor number