LEOPARD-LION-TIGER HYBRID

LEOPARD-LION-TIGER HYBRID

These reports, which contain a lot of showman's hype, mention to a leopard-lion-tiger hybrid. From The New York Times of June 4th, 1906 we have “ALL HYBRIDS AT CONEY. Some Beasts There Are Bi-Hybrids This Year—All Are Mighty Rare. Bulletin chased bulletin out of the animal shows at Coney Island yesterday. A Coney Island animal show is a cheap affair this year if it hasn’t at least one hybrid; naturally the press agents aren't forgetting that fact. Bostock’s press agent announced, with tears in his voiced that “Tricolor,” the Bostock hybrid, had just died. At the same time, however, there were born to the lioness Princess two tiny cubs. Their father is said to be a cross between a puma and “the famous self-eating Jaguar whose favourite occupation is biting a section of his own tail off.” Tricolor was only a cross of a puma, a jaguar, and a lion. That, the press agent says, is quite a common cross. The new cubs, of course, are very rare.” At the same time, various papers reported that “Tricolor,” the Bostock leopard-lion-tiger hybrid, died, and a lioness in Mr. Bostock’s menagerie had given birth to a pair of puma-jaguar-lion prodigies.

Personally, I am dubious because this was a time when showmen were trying to outdo each other with 3-way hybrids following a genuine lion-leopard-jaguar hybrid. Besides, Tricolor is described as "a cross of a puma, a jaguar, and a lion" in one report, and as a "leopard-lion-tiger hybrid" in another. I suspect he was a lion-jaguar-leopard hybrid, because several of these had been bred during this timeframe, including "Uneeka" and the "Congolese Spotted Lion." In addition, it is extremely unlikely that a male hybrid - these are almost always sterile - was able to sire cubs.

October 9th, 1967: "If all goes well, Japanese zoo experts hope to have by next April the world’s first tippon, a cross between a male tiger and a female leopon. The first leopon, offspring of a leopard and lion was successfully bred eight years ago by these experts. Tiger named Ben, aged 3 years and 10 months, and Miss Daisy the leopon, 6 years and 4 months, were mated last week."

December 4th, 1967: "Shasta, Hogle Zoo’s famous liger, will soon have some competition. A news story datelined Toyko announces that come next April the world’s first tippon will be bom at the Osaka Zoo - for those who don’t know, a tippon is a cross between a male tiger and a female leopon."

This was at the same zoo where leopons were produced. it seems that nothing came of the mating as there were no subsequent reports of hybrids.

SNOW LEOPARD x LION HYBRID

DNA analysis indicated historic gene flow from the lion into the snow leopard. It suggests fertile F1 female hybrids were produced from snow leopard males and lionesses; these then bred with snow leopard males. This introduced new X chromosome genes into the snow leopard species. The persistence of these indicates the introduced genes were somehow beneficial to the snow leopard. - Gang Li, , Brian W. Davis, Eduardo Eizirik and William J. Murphy; “Phylogenomic evidence for ancient hybridization in the genomes of living cats (Felidae)”, Genome Res. published online October 30, 2015

"PANTHERA SPECIES" x BAY CAT

DNA studies indicate historic introgression (hybridization and backcrossing) from a male Panthera ancestor (e.g. tiger, lion or leopard) into the Bay Cat. The Bay Cat has a Panthera-like Y chromosome. This must have occurred early enough in their evolution that the species were still genetically similar enough to produce fertile male hybrids. The Panthera-like Y chromosome became widespread in the Bay Cat species indicating it was either beneficial to the Bay Cat or there was a genetic bottleneck. - Gang Li, , Brian W. Davis, Eduardo Eizirik and William J. Murphy; “Phylogenomic evidence for ancient hybridization in the genomes of living cats (Felidae)”, Genome Res. published online October 30, 2015

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